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Sites in Reuse in Florida

Airco Plating Co.
Site photo

The 2-acre Airco Plating Company Superfund site is located in a commercial and industrial area in Miami, Florida, about one mile northeast of Miami International Airport. The site has been the location of an active metal plating facility since the 1950s. Soil and ground water contamination resulted from the operation of wastewater ponds on site as well as other waste handling practices. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Contaminants of concern include various metals and solvents. The main threat posed by the site is the release of contaminants into the Biscayne Aquifer, the main source of drinking water for Miami-Dade County. EPA’s 1993 cleanup plan included the use of soil vapor extraction (SVE) to clean site soils, the placement of a concrete cover over contaminated soils not addressed by SVE and the treatment of contaminated ground water. As of early 2011, the ground water treatment system has treated over 102 million gallons of water. The potentially responsible party (PRP) is currently coordinating with EPA to place a land use restriction on the site property to prohibit any future landowner from using the facility in a manner inconsistent with the site’s cleanup.
Updated 1/2013

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Alaric Area GW Plume
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The 1.7-acre Site is located in the Orient Park area of Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida, in an urban area with mixed commercial, industrial and residential properties. The Site includes the former Alaric, Inc. property and several adjacent lots where contaminated ground water migrated, including a vacant 3-acre lot to the south owned by Helena Chemical Company. From 1978 to 1981, a concrete company operated on site. It built, repaired and refurbished concrete mixing equipment. From 1981 until 1992, Alaric, Inc. operated a plastics recycling business on site. Site operations during that time contaminated site soils and area ground water. In September 1986, the Hillsborough County Public Health Unit sampled an on-site well at the Alaric, Inc. property and identified perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination. Ground water monitoring in the late 1990s by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection found an area of ground water contamination that was several acres in size. EPA-led sampling of soil and ground water in 1999 indicated the presence of significant quantities of PCE and TCE in soil and ground water samples. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in December 2000. EPA’s cleanup plan includes the removal of the shallow soil contamination and septic tank believed to be the main source of the chlorinated solvents, the treatment of contaminated soil through in-situ thermal remediation and the pumping and treatment of contaminated ground water. Currently, USA Services of Florida occupies the property, conducting fleet maintenance and storage of street sweeping equipment.
Updated 1/2013

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Alpha Chemical Corp.
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Thanks to a partnership between EPA and the State of Florida, contamination at the Alpha Chemical Corporation Superfund site in Lakeland, Florida, is now clean and the community's drinking water supply protected. Since 1967, the 32-acre site has produced polyester resin for fiberglass manufacturers. For ten years, plant operators dumped wastewater and debris into two unlined ponds on the property. Years of improper waste handling resulted in the site-wide contamination. In 1983, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included placing a protective cover, or cap, over the former unlined pond area and monitoring on-site surface water and ground water. Following the completion of all cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1995. Institutional controls placed on the property in 1989 make sure that the use of the site property does not damage the protective cover or operation of any monitoring system. The successful cleanup of the site and improved disposal practices by the on-site business now protect the health and safety of nearby residents and the environment. The effectiveness of the chosen remedy also enables the manufacturer to continue to operate as a productive business in the community.
Updated 1/2013

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Anaconda Aluminum Co./Milgo Electronics Corp.
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The Anaconda Aluminum Co./Milgo Electronics Corp. operated in Miami, Florida from 1957 to 1983 and consists of the adjacent one-acre Anaconda and two-acre Milgo sites. The Anaconda Aluminum Co. conducted electrochemical processing using acids and an aluminum-laden caustic base to produce a film of protective coating on aluminum. From 1961 to 1984, Milgo Electronic performed chrome, nickel and copper electroplating of data processing equipment, and manufactured cabinets for electronic components. Both companies disposed of liquid wastes via on-site drain fields. Sampling conducted in 1987 detected cyanide and heavy metals, such as cadmium, lead, zinc, iron, selenium, chromium and copper in area ground water. The widespread contamination resulted from former manufacturing and process waste disposal practices. Sediment, surface water and soils contained heavy metals such as mercury, selenium and arsenic. The contaminated ground water plume reached the Biscayne aquifer, the sole source of drinking water for South Florida, resulting in the site’s addition to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities included the excavation and proper disposal of contaminated site soil. Ground water monitoring verified the effectiveness of the removal action, resulting in the site’s deletion from the NPL in 1998. Due to the success of the chosen remedy, the former Anaconda facility is now in reuse, providing various warehousing opportunities. The Milgo facility is also experiencing reuse, serving as a base of operations by a boat manufacturing company.
Updated 1/2013

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Anodyne, Inc.
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The Anodyne, Inc. Superfund site is located near North Miami Beach, Florida. The 4-acre site lies in Sunshine State Industrial Park, in an unincorporated part of Miami-Dade County. Between 1960 and 1978, Anodyne and other companies used the site for a variety of industrial operations. Consumer products produced at the facility included decorative trim, control panels and equipment dials. Site operators stored process chemicals in aboveground tanks on site and disposed of wastes directly on the ground outside. In addition, site operators might have disposed of waste in a deep on-site well. These improper storage and disposal practices contaminated ground water and soil. The well is the likely source of the site’s deep aquifer ground water contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990 and issued a cleanup plan in 1993. This plan included removal of contaminated soil, addition of clean soil to removal areas, treatment and disposal of shallow contaminated ground water, and treatment and long-term monitoring of ground water. EPA supported the reuse of the site through EPA Region 4’s Prospective Purchaser Inquiry (PPI) Process. The PPI process offers prospective purchasers fast, accurate and comprehensive information to enable them to make timely purchasing decisions. Today, several commercial businesses continue to operate in the former Anodyne facility. These include a packaged snack distribution center, a security firm office, a heating and air conditioning distributor, a storage container manufacturer and a parking facility.
Updated 5/2014

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B & B Chemical Co., Inc.
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The 4.5-acre B&B Chemical Co., Inc. Superfund site is located in Hialeah, Florida, in the Miami metropolitan area. In 1959, B&B Tritech, Inc. (B&B) constructed a five-building facility on site. Site operators mixed industrial cleaning products such as polishes, detergents and solvents. Many of the containers rusted and broke, spilling their contents onto the ground and contaminating the ground water. In 1981, construction workers working on a water pipe near the site reported skin irritation and burns. The Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resource Management investigated the incident and filed a civil suit against B&B in 1984. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990 and began monitoring site ground water quality. As a result of treatment and close monitoring, the ground water currently meets federal and state drinking water standards. EPA put land use controls in place to ensure that the contamination is contained and future property use is restricted to commercial and industrial functions. Any new construction on the property will require evaluation by EPA. Currently, B&B Tritech, Inc. retains ownership of the property and manufactures chemical compounds at the site.
Updated 10/2013

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Beulah Landfill
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The 101-acre Beulah Landfill Superfund site in Pensacola, Florida, served as a waste disposal area from 1966 until 1984, when the State of Florida ordered a halt to operations. In 1990, EPA added this site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The selected remedy included implementing institutional controls to limit future development at the site, taking steps to prevent trespassers from accessing the site, and completing a landfill closure according to Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) standards (these included capping the landfill area). In 1998, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. Ground water monitoring continues on the site. After a number of discussions among stakeholders about potential uses for the site, the Northwest Florida Modelers, Inc. negotiated an agreement with Escambia County to use the site for aeromodeling. Today, the northern part of Beulah Landfill, now known as Fritz Field, is a successful model airplane park that has received high praise from local news media. Escambia County also funded a runway for plane take-off and landing. Local astronomers also recently expressed interest in establishing an observatory at the site and an on-site drainage pond may soon serve as an area to operate model boats. According to the terms of use, money generated from the use of the site cannot be used for individual profit, but rather, it must be invested in site improvements, ensuring the continued maintenance of the site.
Updated 1/2013

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BMI-Textron
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The 3.4-acre Basic Microelectronics, Inc. (BMI)-Textron Superfund site is located in Lake Park, Florida, just north of West Palm Beach. BMI began manufacturing operations in the Tri-City Industrial Park in 1969. Textron Inc. purchased BMI in 1981 and began operating at the site as BMI-Textron. The facility manufactured chromium-backed glass plates used in the production of electronic parts. Site operators disposed of liquid process waste containing cyanide in on-site percolation ponds and drain fields under a Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) permit. A 1984 FDEP investigation found that site activities contaminated soil and ground water with arsenic, cyanide, fluoride and sodium. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP), BMI-Textron, addressed soil-related threats through cleanup actions in 1984 and 1990 with oversight provided by EPA and FDEP. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990 and selected a final cleanup plan in a 1994 Record of Decision (ROD). Cleanup activities included monitored natural attenuation of contaminated ground water and the site access restrictions. After ground water achieved drinking water standards in 1982, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. EPA’s cleanup plan enabled the continued commercial and light industrial use of the site throughout the cleanup process. Today, Florida Aero Precision operates an aerospace parts manufacturing facility in the former BMI-Textron building, specializing in the manufacture of turbine engine parts for industrial gas turbines and flight turbines. Numerous other commercial businesses also operate on the site, including a sign manufacturer, furniture manufacturer, electrical, masonry and cabinetry contractors, a cleaning company, and a flooring company.
Updated 10/2013

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Cabot/Koppers
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The 170-acre Cabot/Koppers Superfund site is located in Gainesville, Florida. Since the early 1900s, two companies, Cabot Corporation and Koppers Co., Inc., operated pine tar, charcoal and wood-preserving facilities at two separate properties included on the site. Operations led to the release of hazardous wastes into unlined ponds, the site’s ground water and soil 30 feet below the surface. In 1984, EPA added the Superfund National Priorities List. Collaboration among EPA, state and local government, previous owners and local developers led to the site’s remediation and continued commercial use as a shopping complex and car dealership. On six-acres of the Cabot Carbon portion of the site, a car dealership remains in operation, as well as a furniture store, a grocery store and additional retail stores. A wood treating facility operated on the Koppers portion of the site from 1916 until 2009. By working with local officials and property owners, EPA helped to keep the site in use as a productive asset for the community, while protecting human health and the environment.
Updated 1/2013

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Cascade Park Gasification Plant
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From the early 1900s until the mid-1950s, the City of Tallahassee, Florida operated a manufactured gas plant (MGP) on the southeastern edge of the Cascade Park site. The plant turned coal reserves into gas to provide light and heat for city residents. Area ground water, soil and sediment contamination resulted from decades of operations and improper waste handling practices at the site. A city-owned landfill, located on the southern portion of the site, opened in the 1920s and accepted waste from the manufactured gas plant. This resulted in additional contamination. Industrial MGP operations ended at the site in the 1950s. In 1987, EPA identified area-wide contamination at the site. The City of Tallahassee worked with EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to clean up the site. Historically, the northwestern portion of the Cascade Park site served as a recreational area. Significant recreational landmarks included Centennial Field, originally built in 1926 to mark Tallahassee’s 100th anniversary. During cleanup, the City advocated for improvements to existing infrastructure that would support future reuse. In order to preserve the city’s natural resources and to celebrate the Cascade Park site’s cultural heritage, the City of Tallahassee and Blueprint 2000, a local, taxpayer-funded intergovernmental agency, developed a community-wide redevelopment plan. The plan integrates recreational trails, community gathering places, public parks and stormwater management facilities over 26 acres of downtown Tallahassee. In 2008, EPA awarded the site Region 4's "Excellence in Site Reuse" award, an honor given to those who go above and beyond in their Superfund site redevelopment efforts. In April 2010, the City began constructing the new recreational park system at the former MGP property. EPA and the City of Tallahassee continued evaluating technologies to address groundwater contamination from the historical MGP operations during redevelopment activities. Cascade Park officially opened with a kickoff ceremony held on March 14, 2014 with over a thousand people in attendance. Key features of the park include trails, playgrounds, a 16-foot waterfall, interactive fountains, a war memorial, and a state-of-the-art amphitheater for concerts and community events.
Updated 4/2014

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Chemform, Inc.
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The four-acre Chemform, Inc. site, located in Pompano Beach, Florida, operated as a precision machine shop manufacturing metal parts for the aerospace industry. Operations continued from 1967 to 1985, including conventional machine making and the manufacturing of a high-tech electro-chemical milling machine. The company also designed, manufactured and marketed electrochemical machines for other industries. Operations discharged process wastewater into an open trench west of the building and into a septic system and associated leach field near the manufacturing building. A 1985 assessment found the soil and ground water at the site were contaminated with heavy metals and other contaminants. In 1989, EPA listed the site on the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities at the site included the excavation and proper disposal of approximately 3,600 cubic yards of soil, the removal of on-site drums and debris, and soil and sludge from two underground storage tanks. Following cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2000. Today, the redeveloped site provides employment opportunities to the local community. In 2010, The Sol Group opened a wholesale produce distribution center at the site.
Updated 1/2013

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City Industries, Inc.
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The City Industries, Inc. Superfund site is a one-acre former hazardous waste recycling and transfer facility in the Winter Park neighborhood of Orlando, Florida. City Industries, Inc. received, handled, stored, reclaimed and disposed of a variety of waste chemicals on the property. Improper disposal practices led to on-site soil and ground water contamination. In 1983, following the state’s order to cease operations, City Chemical Company abandoned the site, leaving approximately 1,200 barrels of hazardous waste and thousands of gallons of sludge in a number of large holding tanks on site. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA cleanup activities included the treatment of 1,670 tons of contaminated soil and the installation of a ground water pump and treatment system. Since 1983, facility uses include small commercial and retail business operations.
Updated 1/2013

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Davie Landfill
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The Davie Landfill Superfund site, located in Broward County, Florida, began operation in 1964 and continued until 1987. The landfill accepted construction debris, tires and municipal wastes. Additionally, a basin at the site received grease trap material, septic tank sludge and treated municipal sludge. Waste disposal activities led to the contamination of the site’s soils, sediments and ground water. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List in 1983. With EPA’s oversight, Broward County remediated the cyanide and sulfide contaminated basin sediments, stabilizing the material in a disposal cell and capping the cell with a protective covering. Monitored natural attenuation addresses the vinyl chloride and antimony contamination in the site’s ground water and the most recent data verifies the achievement of cleanup standards and the success of the chosen remedy. In 2006, EPA deleted the site from the National Priorities List (NPL). In addition to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment, the site’s cleanup also resulted in the creation of a new community resource for Broward County. The site’s remedy allows for a variety of recreational uses while a 50-acre portion of the site remains designated as a restricted use area that includes a buried municipal waste cell and a gas collection system. Approximately 160 acres of the 210-acre site now serve as home to the Vista View Park. Activities in the park include horseback riding along many trails, biking, a trail with fitness stations, rollerblading, paragliding, primitive camping, radio-controlled plane flying and boating, catch and release fishing, and many other types of passive use. There are also two playgrounds at the park, one of which received certification from Boundless Playgrounds for exceeding the minimum requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The efforts by various stakeholders including regulatory agencies, public officials, local residents and public interest groups spurred the development of the park. Vista View Park, which opened in July 2003, helped fulfill the growing demand in the area for parkland and recreational facilities, as the County is now the second most populous county in Florida. In late June 2010, EPA awarded Broward County, Florida the EPA Region 4 “Excellence in Site Reuse” award for redeveloping the former Davie Landfill Superfund site into the Vista View Park.
Updated 1/2013

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Escambia Wood - Pensacola
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From 1942 until 1982, the Escambia Wood Treating Company operated a wood preserving plant on a 26-acre tract of land in Pensacola, Florida. Excess wood preservative drained from the treated products into drip tracks, resulting in widespread contamination of soil and ground water. In 1991, the company filed for bankruptcy and abandoned the facility. In 1994, EPA added the site to the Superfund National Priority List (NPL). The site has undergone multiple removal and remedial actions, and investigations are ongoing. Remedial activities include: the permanent relocation of hundreds of residential households affected by site contamination, the placement of institutional controls to restrict future land use to industrial and commercial uses and to restrict ground water use, excavation of contaminated soil and its placement into a lined and capped cell, and the installation and operation of a ground water treatment system. In 1999, EPA awarded a Superfund Redevelopment Pilot Grant to facilitate reuse at this site and signed a Cooperative Agreement with the Escambia County Community Redevelopment Agency to determine a reasonably anticipated future land use for the property. Completed in 2001, the Palafox Commerce Master Plan outlined an eco-industrial park that will include commercial, industrial and green space uses. The design and implementation of the final remedy, selected in 2006, took into account the future reuse plans.
Updated 1/2013

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Flash Cleaners
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The 0.5-acre Flash Cleaners Superfund site is located in a commercial business area of Pompano Beach, Florida. From 1977 to 2001, Flash Cleaners operated as a dry cleaning facility at the site. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) inspected the facility in 1999. FDEP found machinery leaking dry cleaning products and solvents onto the ground due to improper installation. In 2002, FDEP and EPA determined that the on-site contamination posed a potential threat to human health due to the migration of contamination from the site to the groundwater. Site contamination does not threaten people near the site. Residents and businesses use the public water system for drinking water. In 2008, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). In 2011, EPA excavated and removed contaminated soil from the site and injected organic material into groundwater to enhance the natural breakdown process of the groundwater contaminants. EPA also installed a soil vapor extraction system (SVE) to remove contamination in the soils beneath the building. EPA is monitoring the soil and groundwater cleanup. While there was a pick-up and drop-off cleaning business operating on the site from 2001 to 2011, currently the property and the building stand vacant.
Updated 10/2013

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Florida Petroleum Reprocessors
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The Florida Petroleum Reprocessors (FPR) Superfund site is located in Davie, Florida. The site consists of the 1-acre facility property and a groundwater plume that initially covered about 870 acres. From 1979 to 1992, several companies operated at the FPR facility, including used motor oil and fuel recycling businesses. In 1996, EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) identified contamination at a near-by municipal water well field. The agencies traced the contamination back to the FPR facility. In response, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1998. In 2001, EPA issued a cleanup plan, which called for the collection and treatment of contaminated ground water, and long-term treatment of ground water at the well field. A 2004 Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) postponed the long-term ground water treatment to gather additional data. Removal actions at the facility removed contaminated source materials and natural attenuation addresses the contaminated ground water plume. EPA continues to evaluate the progress of the cleanup. In 2010, the site owners entered into an agreement with EPA to keep the site vacant until the completion of all site cleanup activities. EPA’s cleanup plan allowed for the reuse of part of the site. Previous reuse efforts included vehicle and equipment storage. Today, several billboards are located onsite.
Updated 10/2013

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Florida Steel Corp.
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The Florida Steel Corporation site occupies 152 acres just northwest of Indiantown, Florida. From 1970 until 1982, site operations included recycling cars and scrap metal to produce steel reinforcement bars for concrete. EPA added the site to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) in 1982, following the detection of heavy metals in emissions control (EC) dust and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in on-site soil. A 1994 remedy decision initiated activities to excavate contaminated soil and contain remaining EC dust under an onsite cap, as well as to extract and treat ground water and excavated wetland sediments. Currently, remedy construction is complete and a ground water treatment system continues to operate on the site. Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC secured an option to purchase the property in 2010 with plans to construct a natural gas storage facility on the site. The completed facility would have the capacity to store eight billion cubic feet of natural gas, providing a secure site for storing state energy reserves should hurricanes or other emergencies interrupt energy utilities. Availability of the reserve should also help stabilize fuel costs, as well as stimulate the local economy by creating jobs and paying taxes to the county.
Updated 1/2013

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Former Spellman Engineering
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The Former Spellman Engineering site is located near Lake Highland, an area considered the northern gateway to downtown Orlando, Florida and one of the most important pieces of undeveloped land in the area. Spellman Engineering, a former parts cleaning facility, operated at the site from 1963 to 1969. In 1992, EPA detected in a contaminant plume of chemicals associated with the parts cleaning business extending off the property. The City of Orlando and Orlando Utility Commission (OUC) acquired much of the impacted property prior to the discovery of the plume. Under a lease agreement with an option to purchase, the Lake Highland Preparatory School (LHPS) developed a portion of the land into a sports and recreational complex. The property’s significant value presented the City and OUC with the opportunity to use proceeds from its sale to help fund the site’s cleanup while preventing the site’s listing on EPA’s National Priorities List (NPL). The project provided positive outcomes for all parties involved. For the City and OUC, the site’s cleanup protects public health, while the adjacent property’s redevelopment will provide new land uses to address community needs. For the surrounding neighborhoods, the site’s cleanup addresses local health and safety concerns, removes a community "eyesore", and results in the Lake Highland property’s redevelopment in a manner consistent with community goals and priorities. For LHPS, the site’s cleanup provides an adjacent land area for both new and expanded school facilities. Today, the school’s O’Meara Family Sports Center includes a new ball field, practice fields and parking, with future expansion plans calling for a gymnasium and maintenance facilities. The Dinky Line segment of the Orlando Urban Trail, a paved recreational trail, now extends through the area. The City and OUC are also exploring opportunities for mixed-use redevelopment near Central Florida’s new SunRail commuter rail line and other planned public transit facilities. The burial of the sites ground water cleanup system allowed for remediation while at the same time optimized the area for reuse.
Updated 1/2013

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Harris Corp. (Palm Bay Plant)
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The 310-acre Harris Corp. (Palm Bay Plant) Superfund site is located in Palm Bay, Florida. The site was home to an electronics firm supporting the aerospace industry from the 1950s until Harris Corporation purchased the firm in 1967. Harris Corporation began manufacturing circuit boards for government and aerospace programs, as well as products for consumer electronics and telecommunications. Previous site uses also included painting, chromium plating, machining and drum storage. Intersil Corporation bought the operations from Harris Corporation. Both companies currently continue to manufacture equipment on the site. In the early 1980s, EPA discovered ground water contamination under the facility and in a nearby well field. As a result, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. EPA led cleanup activities. Cleanup activities involved the extraction and treatment of the contaminated ground water. In October 2002, ground water treatment ended. Ground water monitoring will continue until contaminant levels meet site cleanup goals. EPA issued a Ready for Reuse (RfR) determination for the site in November 2009. The RfR determination clarified that institutional controls successfully prevent exposure by unlawful ground water access at the site. In April 2010, Intersil Corporation donated a $13 million state-of-the-art fabrication facility and a 5-acre property to the University of Central Florida as a research center. The University retained the option to accept the donated facility until the summer of 2013, but decided against using the buildings. Intersil Corporation is now working with EPA and with the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT) to finalize FIT’s purchase of the facility and land. FIT plans to use the area as an extended campus for students. Harris Corporation will complete construction of a new technology center in late 2014.
Updated 5/2014

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Jacksonville Ash
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The Jacksonville Ash Site Superfund Site is located in Jacksonville, Florida. The Site includes three sites: the Forest Street Incinerator, the 5th & Cleveland Incinerator, and Lonnie C. Miller, Sr. Park. The Forest Street Incinerator and 5th & Cleveland Incinerator operated as the City of Jacksonville’s municipal solid waste incinerators from the 1910s until the 1960s. Site operators disposed of combustion ash, clinker and ash residues on each of the incinerator properties and on the land that later became the Lonnie C. Miller, Sr. Park. EPA did not list the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA considers the site to be an NPL-caliber site and is addressing the site through the Superfund Alternative Approach. This approach uses the same investigation and cleanup process and standards used for sites listed on the NPL. The City of Jacksonville conducted site investigations and found elevated lead levels in the soil due to the presence of incinerator ash on the sites. Elevated but low levels of arsenic and dioxins also contaminated soil at each of the three sites. EPA’s 2006 cleanup plan involved the removal of ash-related contamination to a depth of up to two feet in residential areas. The cleanup plan also included the placement of two feet of clean soil cover over ash-related contamination in non-residential areas. Current land uses on this large site include residential, commercial, recreational and public services. All three sections of the site remained in continued use through site cleanup activities. The Lonnie C. Miller, Sr. Park section of the site offers recreational amenities including play-ground equipment, picnic pavilions, a restroom building, a sand volleyball court, paved walking paths and parking areas in the uncontaminated area of the park. The 5th Street and Cleveland Incinerator section of the site is home to the Emmet C. Reed Community Center building, a pool and recreational facilities, including a basketball court, playground equipment, tennis courts and paved parking areas. The Forest Street incinerator section of the site includes a park building and playground equipment, a baseball field, paved parking and playground areas. The cleanup is still underway and is expected to continue until December, 2014.
Updated 1/2013

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Landia Chemical Company Green Infrastructure
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The 13-acre Landia Chemical Company Superfund site is located in Lakeland, Florida. The site spans two property parcels: the former Landia Chemical Company (LCC) property and the former Florida Favorite Fertilizer (FFF). FFF began fertilizer-blending operations around 1935. Between 1945 and 1987 three different companies operated pesticide blending and formulating businesses on the former LCC property. Over time, the companies released pesticides, metals and other contaminants into the environment. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000. With oversight provided by EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the responsible parties lead investigation and cleanup activities at the site. This includes removal and disposal of contaminated soil, institutional controls and ground water treatment. Responsible parties leading cleanup activities have replanted portions of the site with 1,000 individual trees and plants. Over 30 varieties of plants, including red maples, slash pines and poplar trees, now grow on site. These areas provide habitats for native wildlife, migratory birds and pollinators. The trees also aid ground water cleanup through uptake and phytoremediation. In addition to continued ecological use, FFF transferred its property to PCS Joint Ventures, Inc. (PCS JV) in 1992. In 2006, PCS JV then sold the property to Sylvite Southeast Ltd, a wholesale fertilizer merchant. The company continues operating a fertilizer blending facility on site. In 2013, EPA chose the site for an “Excellence in Site Reuse” award to recognize ecological revitalization and reuse activities at the site.
Updated 4/2014

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Miami Drum Services
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The William Lehman Operations and Maintenance Center in Miami, Florida, was built on the former Miami Drum Services Superfund site and supports Dade County's public electric rail system. A drum recycling facility operated at this site in southern Florida from 1966 to 1981. Due to years of improper waste management activities, corrosives, solvents and toxic metals once used to clean the hazardous waste and chemical storage drums contaminated area soil and ground water used for drinking. Once Miami Drum Services ceased operations, Dade County acquired the property for use as a maintenance facility and repair yard for its public rail lines. Following site investigations and the discovery of hazardous waste contamination EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Dade County teamed with EPA to develop a strategy to remove 15,000 tons of contaminated soil and treat over 650,000 gallons of contaminated ground water. Thanks to the successful cleanup, Dade County was able to resume construction of the 82-acre train repair facility that is now in operation. Today, the facility ensures the safety, quality and timeliness of Dade County's commuter trains that serve 50,000 people a day.
Updated 1/2013

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Munisport Landfill
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The Munisport Landfill Superfund site is located in the center of North Miami, Florida. A wetland mangrove preserve connected to Biscayne Bay borders the site. The 170-acre former landfill is part of a larger 291-acre parcel of land originally planned to be part of a trade and cultural center and, later, a recreation center. The center’s developers received solid waste in the 1970s for use as fill material during construction. The developers disposed of six million cubic yards of solid waste in an unlined landfill. These disposal practices contaminated area ground water and surface water. As a result, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Site investigations in the late 1980s showed that the landfill no longer threatened human health, but additional cleanup was necessary in the mangrove wetlands. Workers installed a hydraulic barrier to collect and treat ground water and to prevent contaminant migration. Additional tidal wetland restoration activities followed. Following the completion of these cleanup activities, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1999. Beginning in 2002, developers began to work toward the creation of a billion-dollar master-planned community on the site, known as Biscayne Landing. Though construction stalled in 2007 due to a worsened economy, plans include residences and a shopping mall. Today, two 25-story towers of luxury condominiums are complete.
Updated 6/2014

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Normandy Park Apartments
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The 9-acre Normandy Park Apartments Superfund site is located in Temple Terrace, Florida, near the city of Tampa. From 1953 to 1963, Gulf Coast Recycling, Inc. operated a battery recycling and secondary lead smelting facility on the site. Facility operations resulted in the release of sulfuric acid and lead into the environment. The company built a 144-unit apartment complex on the property in 1970. EPA sampling in the early 1990s confirmed widespread lead contamination throughout the site at levels that threatened human health and the environment. EPA proposed the site for placement on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1995, but the listing was never finalized. In 2000, EPA issued a cleanup plan that included the excavation of the top two feet of exposed soil around the entire apartment complex and the placement of clean dirt and sod in all excavated areas. The plan also included the treatment of contaminated soil, the monitoring of the natural attenuation of ground water contaminants and the placement of restrictions to limit the future use of soil and ground water. Envirofocus acquired Gulf Coast Recycling and is now responsible for operation and maintenance activities at the site. EPA and the Florida Department for Environmental Protection provide oversight. The apartment complex, complete with a playground, an apartment clubhouse, a laundry facility and tennis courts, continues to operate as a residential property. The northern courtyard consists of 80 residential units in eight buildings. The southern courtyard consists of 64 residential units in four buildings.
Updated 1/2013

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Northwest 58th Street Landfill Green Infrastructure
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The 660-acre Northwest 58th Street Landfill Superfund site is located in Hialeah, Florida. From 1952 to 1982, Miami-Dade County operated a municipal landfill at the site. The landfill accepted municipal and industrial wastes. Improper storage and burning of waste on site resulted in the contamination of ground water. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA issued a cleanup plan in 1987. This plan included the connection of private well users impacted by the landfill to the public water system; closure of the landfill in accordance with state and EPA guidance; and the placement of controls to address leachate, landfill gas migration and odor. Leachate is water that collects contaminants as it passes through contaminated material on site. Miami-Dade County, the site’s potentially responsible party, led site investigation and cleanup activities, with oversight provided by EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Although the site's landfill area is fenced and closed to the public, Miami-Dade County has started to allow school groups, bird watchers and other visitors on site (with advanced notice) to view the wetland area and associated wildlife. Visitors can walk along a crushed-stone trail that extends along most of the southern shore of the storm water management/restored wetland area. The site is also a staging area for management of hurricane debris. The southern portion of the site has been developed and put into reuse with a variety of municipal uses. Several Dade County facilities, including the Mosquito Control Division, Public Works and Public Safety Training Facilities, as well as South Florida Water Management District offices are located on site. Miami-Dade County is currently determining potential reuse options for another portion of the site. The county's Park and Recreation Department is interested in developing a 15-field soccer complex on the southwest comer of the landfill. Additional future plans for the site include possible governmental uses such as a fire department training tower and solar power generation.
Updated 1/2013

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Parramore Surplus
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The 25-acre Parramore Surplus Company Superfund site, in Mount Pleasant, Florida, is home to an active storage and resale company for U.S. Navy and Air Force surplus equipment. In the early 1970s, Parramore Surplus began purchasing products from various naval and air force bases in Florida and Alabama. These products included drummed paint residues, waste oil, alcohols and degreasers. In 1982, the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER) inspected the site and found over 400 drums, some of which leaked, killing vegetation. At the request of FDER, EPA conducted a site inspection and collected soil and waste samples in 1982. In 1983, based on those inspection results, EPA added the site to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL), and developed a plan to clean the site. The potentially responsible party financed the entire cleanup, which included removing contaminated soil as well as treating and monitoring the ground water. In consultation with the State, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1989. The design of EPA’s cleanup plan enabled the surplus company to remain open for business, retaining jobs and income in the community as well as maintaining a safe working environment.
Updated 1/2013

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Pepper Steel & Alloys, Inc.
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The 25-acre Pepper Steel & Alloys, Inc. Superfund site is located near Medley, Florida, northwest of Miami. From the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s, a variety of industrial businesses operated at the site. These businesses included manufacturers, equipment repair shops, and a recycler. The firms disposed of trash and waste products, including rusted machinery and vehicles, tanks and batteries, on site. The last business closed by the mid-1980s, leaving the vacant site an attractive area for illegal dumping. The improper disposal practices contaminated site soil and ground water. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). With EPA and Florida Department of Environmental Protection oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties lead site investigations and cleanup. Cleanup activities included removal and disposal of waste and debris as well as collection, treatment and capped storage of contaminated soils. The capped area containing the treated soil covers 11 acres. In 2005, a trucking company purchased part of the site for truck storage. A pre-cast concrete products company uses part of the site for its manufacturing operations.
Updated 5/2014

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Petroleum Products Corp.
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The 3-acre Petroleum Products Corp. Superfund site is located in Pembroke Park, Florida. Petroleum Products Corporation operated a used oil refining facility at the site from 1957 until 1971. Improper waste handling practices and oil spills resulted in the contamination of soil and ground water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup activities have focused on waste oil recovery. An EPA site investigation is currently underway. Following the completion of the investigation, EPA will select a final cleanup plan to address remaining soil and ground water contamination. The site is located in a commercial and industrial area. Continued uses at the site include Pembroke Park Warehouses, a 400-unit storage facility, a shooting range and a restaurant.
Updated 10/2013

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Piper Aircraft Corp./Vero Beach Water & Sewer Department

The 80-acre Piper Aircraft Corp. site in Vero Beach, Florida operates as an active manufacturing facility for small commuter and business planes. The facility began manufacturing airplanes and storing chemicals used in the assembly process in an on-site underground storage tank in 1975. Soil and ground water contamination at the site resulted from a leak in an underground storage tank containing the volatile organic compound trichloroethylene (TCE). In 1978, investigations discovered the presence of TCE and related breakdown products in on-site ground water, as well as in a city well located across the street from the southern boundary of the property. These findings resulted in the installation of a ground water pump and treatment system in 1981 and the addition of the site to EPA’s National Priorities List in 1990. With EPA and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) oversight, Piper Aircraft, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP), leads site cleanup activities. Following the completion of a remedial design for an improved pump and treatment system in 1997, a new ground water extraction and treatment system began operation in 1998. Ground water treatment and monitoring are ongoing.
Updated 10/2013

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Raleigh Street Dump
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The 5-acre Raleigh Street Dump Superfund site is located in Tampa, Florida. Various parties used the dump continuously from 1977 until 1991. Raleigh Street Dump accepted wastes such as battery casings, furnace slag, trash and construction debris. In 1988, the Hillsborough County Environmental Protection Commission received complaints that Tampa Fiberglass improperly disposed of waste at the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2009. Cleanup activities include the removal and disposal of contaminated soils, addition of clean soils, planting of grass seed, restoration of wetland areas on site, monitoring of natural processes to clean up ground water contaminants, and the placement of controls on the site to limit future use of soil and ground water. Tampa Fiberglass continues to operate a fiberglass production facility on the southern portion of the site.
Updated 10/2013

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Sapp Battery
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The 45-acre Sapp Battery Salvage Superfund site is a former battery recycling facility that operated from the early 1970s until 1980 in Jackson County, Florida. The recycling operations involved cracking open lead-acid batteries, removing the lead for recycling, and then dumping battery acid and plastic battery casings into an on-site holding pond and the surrounding swamps. The improper disposal of battery casings and battery acid contaminated the ground water, soil and surrounding wetlands with sulfuric acid and heavy metals, primarily lead. In 1980, after legal action by the State, the Sapp Battery Company abruptly closed and abandoned the facility. In August 1982, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) and the State of Florida conducted several more interim response actions in 1984 and 1985. EPA selected a remedy for the site in September 1986, including the excavation and treatment of contaminated soil and sediments and the cleanup of contaminated ground water, which is currently underway. The Sapp Battery Group, the site’s potentially responsible party, leads soil investigation and cleanup activities, with oversight provided by EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). EPA leads investigation and cleanup activities of contaminated sediments in nearby swamps and wetlands as well as ground water investigation and cleanup activities in cooperation with FDEP. Over 30 acres of the site include restored wetlands and ecological habitats. Local government officials and members of the community would like to see the site returned to productive use. Possible future site uses could involve ecological and/or recreational uses.
Updated 1/2013

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Schuylkill Metals Corp. Green Infrastructure
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The 17.4-acre Schuylkill Metals Corp. Superfund site is the former location of a battery recycling facility that operated from 1972 to 1986 in Plant City, Florida. Site operators received used batteries, removed the lead plates and sent them off-site to a Louisiana smelter. Initially, operators dumped spent battery electrolyte solution containing sulfuric acid on the ground. Later, operators collected the solution in tanks for eventual resale. Operators collected saw cooling water and battery wash water in sumps and treated it prior to discharge into an unlined holding pond. Operators also landfilled emptied battery cases on site. Site investigations verified that improper waste management resulted in lead and chromium contamination of site soil, sediment, surface and ground water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In June 1986, facility operations ceased. EPA’s 1990 cleanup plan included the excavation and treatment of contaminated soil, the pumping and treatment of contaminated ground water, and fencing and monitoring of the on-site marshes. Cleanup activities included the consolidation, stabilization and solidification of contaminated soils and sediment. The solidified soil was then buried onsite and covered with clean soil and vegetation. Today, cleanup activities are complete and EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2001. The entire site is fenced and secured to prevent access and the public water supply connects to area residents and businesses. The potentially responsible parties removed all contaminated sediments above the specified concentration from the site’s wetlands and replanted the areas with native vegetation. The successful cleanup and restoration of the site created 11 acres of new wildlife habitat. Two Florida Department of Environmental Protection conservation easements ensure the protection of the new wetlands.
Updated 1/2013

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Solitron Devices
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The 8-acre Solitron Devices, Inc. Superfund site is located in Riviera Beach, Florida. In 1959, Honeywell, Inc. built a facility at the site and began manufacturing electronic components for the defense and space industries. In 1965, Solitron Devices, Inc. assumed ownership from Honeywell, Inc. Solitron Devices, Inc. continued similar operations and expanded the facility. Honeywell, Inc. and Solitron Devices, Inc. used heavy metals and organic solvents during facility operations. The facility’s industrial wastewater discharged to the City of Riviera Beach’s sewer system. In 1985, a Florida Department of Environmental Protection study established that solvents from the site contaminated some of the municipal supply wells in the City of Riviera Beach’s public well field. These investigations found ground water contamination and a small area of metals-contaminated soil. In 2004, EPA issued a cleanup plan for the site. The plan included the excavation and disposal of contaminated soil from behind the north building off site and the pumping and treating of contaminated ground water using air stripping. The cleanup plan also included the injection of treated water into the ground with added oxygen to enhance the natural breakdown of contaminants. The site’s existing facilities, a 78,000 square foot warehouse, parking lot and paved entrance road, lay idle after former site owner Solitron Devices’ 1992 bankruptcy filing. In 1999, EPA entered into a prospective purchaser agreement with the National Land Company (NLC) for the northern, 4-acre portion of the property. In 2000, NLC purchased the northern portion of the site. NLC renovated the area for commercial and light industrial land uses, including warehousing, light manufacturing and storage. In 2008, All Air Conditioned Self Storage, Inc. purchased the property and currently operates a self-storage facility. The property’s reuse now provides employment opportunities and tax revenues for the City of Riviera Beach. The Solitron Devices site demonstrates how reuse planning can be effectively coordinated with ongoing remediation.
Updated 1/2013

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Solitron Microwave Green Infrastructure
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The 20-acre Solitron Microwave Superfund site is located in Port Salerno, Florida. Metal plating and microwave component manufacturing businesses operated on the site from 1963 until 1987. Manufacturers produced materials for the military, aerospace and microwave industries. Between 1968 and January 1987, manufacturing and cleaning solvents contaminated soil and ground water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1998. Started in 2000 and completed in 2004, the site’s cleanup included soil removal, ground water treatment and extension of the public water supply to impacted residents. Monitoring of the natural breakdown of contaminants in ground water continues. EPA provided safety and liability information to local officials and prospective purchasers to promote reuse. Port Salerno Industrial Park (PSIP), LLC purchased the site in 2003. PSIP worked with EPA to reuse the site as an industrial park for warehouse, office space and commercial facility. The industrial park consists of seven lots with a paved roadway. A web printing services business opened in 2006. A land development company purchased site property in 2010 and in 2013, with plans to expand parking and building space.
Updated 5/2014

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Southern Solvents
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The one-acre Southern Solvents, Inc. Superfund site is located in Tampa, Florida. The site formerly housed a dry cleaning solvents distribution facility. The facility operated from the late 1970s to 1985 and resumed operations for a brief period from 1985 to 1989. Dry cleaning solvents were reportedly stored in above ground tanks and in small tanker trucks located on a concrete slab and on the northern portion of the site. Spills from these storage tanks resulted in soil and ground water contamination at the site. EPA completed a preliminary assessment of the site in 1994. As a result, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in July 2000. EPA issued a cleanup plan in 1999. This plan included the excavation and treatment of contaminated soil, the treatment of contaminated ground water and the restriction of ground water use. Since 1998, a commercial painting business, AAA Diversified Services, has operated at the site alongside remediation activities. EPA worked with AAA Diversified Services owner to coordinate cleanup activities and to address potential liability concerns. In 2004, EPA entered into a prospective purchaser agreement with the owner. This agreement allowed him to purchase the property and continue operating his business. This working partnership demonstrates how EPA’s goals of protecting human health and the environment at contaminated properties can be achieved without creating unnecessary barriers for site users.
Updated 1/2013

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Standard Auto Bumper Corp.
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The 7-acre Standard Auto Bumper Corp. Superfund site is located in Hialeah, Florida. From 1959 until 1992, the Standard Auto Bumper Corporation operated a chromium and nickel-plating facility at the site. Facility operators improperly disposed of contaminated waste water in an on-site ditch. In 1985, EPA soil and ground water sampling found contamination associated with metal plating activities. As a result, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. In 1992, EPA selected a cleanup plan that included the removal and disposal of contaminated soil, ground water monitoring and ground water use controls. In 2007, EPA deleted the site from the NPL and put land use restrictions in place to clarify future site use potential. Today, three businesses operate on site; services include truck parking, concrete fencing and roofing.
Updated 5/2014

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Taylor Road Landfill Alternative Energy
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The 42-acre Taylor Road Landfill Superfund site is located in Hillsborough County, Florida. The municipal landfill is one in a complex of three landfills owned and operated by Hillsborough County. The landfills operated from 1976 to 1980. In October 1979, EPA discovered contamination in site monitoring wells. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Hillsborough County closed all three landfills and began a 30-year maintenance and monitoring program. Landfill closure activities included the capping of the landfill, the establishment of a vegetative cover, and the installation of a gas collection system and ground water drainage system. In 1995, EPA issued a cleanup plan for the site. The plan included the use of monitored natural attenuation to address ground water contamination, the implementation of a quarterly ground water monitoring program, the connection of nearby residences to the public water supply, and the placement of restrictions to prevent the drilling of drinking water wells. EPA awarded Hillsborough County the 2010 EPA Region 4 Excellence in Site Reuse award for creatively reusing the site to serve multiple purposes that benefit the community. Hillsborough County established a recycling center, a community collection center, a household chemical/electronics collection center, a site maintenance facility and an environmental field office at the site. The County also uses a portion of the landfill to grow hay for erosion control. In addition, Hillsborough County collaborated with the Tampa Radio-Control Aircraft Club and the Academy of Model Aeronautics to build a model airplane park. The park includes a paved runway and covered working areas. TA Travel also currently leases a strip of the property. Hillsborough County also collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy on a study to evaluate the potential for using methane from landfills as a renewable energy source. This study provided valuable information on using landfill gas for power generation.
Updated 1/2013

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Tower Chemical Co.
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The 16-acre Tower Chemical Co. Superfund site is located about 5-miles east of the City of Clermont, Florida. From 1957 to 1980, Tower Chemical Company operated a pesticide manufacturing and repackaging facility on site. The facility’s waste and wastewater disposal practices resulted in contamination of soil, sediments, surface water and ground water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal of contaminated soil, ground water treatment and monitoring, and temporary land and ground water use restrictions. From 1981 to 1986, Classic Manufacturing Company leased a 1-acre part of the site for manufacturing operations. From 1981 until 1998, Vita-Green Inc. leased the former production facility. In 1982 and 1983, property owners divided the former Tower Chemical Co. property into four tax parcels: a 15-acre parcel and three parcels that make up the remaining one acre. In 2005, new owners purchased the 15-acre parcel and converted the building, slab and the neighboring uncontaminated land into a storage facility for recreational vehicles, boats, trailers and other commercial vehicles. The owners also cleared heavy vegetation from the remainder of the 15-acre parcel in preparation for future expansion. The property now has secure gates and new fencing. In 2006, a commercial trucking operation purchased the remaining three parcels at the site for use as an unpaved parking area for tractor-trailer tank trucks used to haul drinking water. That use has since been discontinued and the parcels are for sale.
Updated 10/2013

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Trans Circuits
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The 1-acre Trans Circuits, Inc. Superfund site is located in an industrial park in Lake Park, Palm Beach County, Florida. From 1978 to 1988, Trans Circuits, Inc. operated a manufacturing and electroplating facility for components used in electronic circuit boards. Liquid wastes deposited in an on-site evaporation pond leaked into the site’s soils and ground water. This resulted in site-wide contamination. Between 1989 and 1998, EPA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection completed several investigations at the site. By 1998, the agencies decided that earlier attempts to clean up the site had been unsuccessful and further action was necessary. In 2000, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List. In 2001, EPA issued a cleanup plan for the site. This included removal of contaminated surface soil, chemical treatment of contaminated ground water, restriction of certain land and ground water uses and the replacement of a public well. The site’s excellent location in a commercialized area within the Tri-City Industrial Park provides favorable redevelopment opportunities. Soon after the bank reclaimed the property from a previous owner, the site sparked the interest of Florida Aero Precision, a gas turbine and aerospace parts manufacturing company, which owned property near the site. The company recognized that the property could provide an ideal production expansion opportunity. The company, as a prospective purchaser, requested an extension of a 2000 Covenant Not to Sue, which EPA had issued to the previous site owner. This document acknowledges that site owners can only reuse the property in ways that will continue to protect the remedy. With these documents in place and with ongoing collaboration between EPA and site stakeholders, Florida Aero Precision purchased the property in November 2011. Site contractors completed property renovations in late May 2012. The company began production operations in the new facility in August 2013. Expanding into the new facility allowed Florida Aero Precision to create 15 additional jobs, many of which are skilled laborer positions. Florida Aero Precision emphasizes environmentally responsible practices and incorporates waste disposal alternatives into their daily operations. EPA will continue to work with stakeholders to support reuse and to ensure protectiveness of the site’s remedy.
Updated 4/2014

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Tri-City Oil Conservation
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The quarter-acre Tri-City Oil Conservationist, Inc. Superfund site is located outside of Tampa, Florida. The site served as a waste oil storage and distribution center until 1983. Careless operating conditions at the site resulted in spills during transfer operations and leaks from tanks and lines. Failure to clean up these spills, in combination with poor surface drainage, caused accumulation of liquid wastes at the site, particularly at the south end of the facility. In 1982, a 3,000-gallon spill of waste oil occurred at the Tri-City operation. The Florida Department of Environmental Regulation (FDER) identified contamination in soil and sludge samples from the spill area. After the owners refused a request by FDER to clean up the spill, EPA took immediate action to clean contamination at the site under the Superfund program. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Later that year, EPA excavated and disposed of 850 cubic yards of contaminated soil. EPA also removed two aboveground storage tanks and a 16,000-gallon underground storage tank from the site. Following removal of the contaminated materials and soil, EPA re-graded the area using clean fill and grass to prevent erosion. In 1986, soil and ground water sampling confirmed the removal of the source of contamination. Sampling also confirmed that drinking water met state and federal standards. EPA determined that no further cleanup activities were necessary at the site and deleted the site from the NPL in 1988. In 1990, Mike’s Garage purchased the property from the bankruptcy trustee and reused the original building as an auto repair business. The business proved to be so successful that the garage expanded in 1997 to include five service stations.
Updated 1/2013

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USN Air Station Cecil Field

The USN Air Station Cecil Field Superfund site is located near Jacksonville, Florida. Before its closure in 1999, the NAS Cecil Field was a master jet base with activities at the base including fuel storage, aircraft maintenance, engine repair and turbojet engine testing. Maintenance activities over the years generated a variety of waste materials. These materials included municipal solid waste, wastewater treatment plant sludge, paints, solvents, oil and petroleum wastes, industrial wastes and waste pesticides. Site investigations identified the presence of widespread soil and ground water contamination. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). A team of agencies, referred to as the Cecil Field Base Realignment and Closure Cleanup Team, or BCT, investigates site conditions and takes steps to clean up the site in order to protect people and the environment from contamination. Current remedial actions at the site include long-term monitoring of creek sediments and surface water, natural attenuation, soil excavation with off-site disposal and ground water treatment. Since 1999, the Navy has transferred 17,042 of the installation’s 17,225 acres to local authorities (the Jacksonville Airport Authority, the City of Jacksonville, and the city’s Parks and Recreation Office) for redevelopment. The Cecil Commerce Center and Cecil Airport are now located at Cecil Field. The Cecil Commerce Center is now home to a new Florida State College at Jacksonville campus. Numerous businesses, including Boeing, Northrop Grumman, Inc., Robinson Aviation, Bridgestone Americas Tire Operations, SAFT America, Inc., L-3 Communications, Titan Group and FlightStar Aircraft Services, also operate at the Center. The Center currently provides the local community with more than 2,500 jobs and greatly expands the area’s tax base. The City of Jacksonville acquired more than 4,000 acres of the northern portion of Cecil Commerce Center for recreational use. Master planning for portions of this area includes passive forms of recreation, such as hiking and horseback riding trails, camping, hunting and fishing. This area is a small portion of a larger natural wildlife preservation corridor. The corridor connects Jennings State Forest in Clay County with Cary State Forest, located north of Cecil Commerce Center. About 900 acres of the northern portion are designated for the Cecil Recreation Complex. This active recreational area includes several tournament level playing fields and sports complexes, playgrounds, open play field areas, a community center, a park maintenance facility and the Jacksonville Equestrian Center. The Fiddlers Green golf course is also open for public use. The BCT will transfer the remaining few acres of the installation to the city after related cleanup work is complete. The BCT continues to work with local authorities to support the effective reuse and redevelopment of the properties at the installation.
Updated 1/2013

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Varsol Spill

The Varsol Spill Superfund site is located in the northeast section of the Miami International Airport in Miami, Florida. The Airport is located less than 0.5 miles south of the Lower Miami Springs Municipal Well Field. Starting in 1966, airport industrial operations resulted in spills and leaks of hydrocarbons totaling nearly 2 million gallons. These spills included an underground pipeline leak that resulted in the discharge of about 1.6 million gallons of the petroleum solvent varsol. The airport discovered the solvent in the northeast section of the airport around 1970. Site investigations verified site surface water and ground water contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Later that year, Dade County installed 43 monitoring wells to determine the extent and magnitude of spilled jet fuel and installed three recovery wells in the Concourse E area. Through May 1984, cleanup activities resulted in the recovery of over 102,000 gallons of jet fuel from the area. An investigative study in 1985 determined that the area was free of petroleum solvent. Based on those findings, EPA determined that the site posed no public or environmental threat and that no further action was required. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1988.

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West Florida Natural Gas Company
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The 8-acre West Florida Natural Gas Company Superfund site is located in Ocala, Florida. The site operated as a manufactured gas plant from 1895 until approximately 1960. Site operations consisted of water gas and carbureted water gas manufacturing until the mid-1950s, when operations changed to manufacturing liquid petroleum gas-air. Byproducts of these manufacturing processes, including coal tar, coke, oils, and condensates, were disposed of on the site. Former waste disposal practices resulted in site soil and ground water contamination. From 1988 through 2006, People’s Gas System, the potentially responsible party (PRP) for the site, completed various site investigations, including a general site characterization for contamination and additional ground water investigations. Additionally, the PRP excavated and disposed of approximately 10,000 tons of impacted soils in 1990. The site is not listed on the National Priorities List (NPL), but is considered an NPL-caliber site and is being addressed through the Superfund Alternative Approach. This approach uses the same investigation and cleanup process and standards used for sites listed on the NPL. A remedial investigation for the West Florida Natural Gas site has been completed and a feasibility study is currently underway. The results from these studies will help develop a proposed cleanup plan for the site. Today, the 6-acre northern portion of the site currently operates as a scrap metal recycling facility. The 2-acre southern portion of the site was the former location of the manufactured gas plant and is covered by an 8-inch-thick concrete slab.
Updated 1/2013

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Wilson Concepts of Florida, Inc.
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The 2-acre Wilson Concepts of Florida, Inc. Superfund site is located in Pompano Beach, Florida. Wilson Concepts operated a precision parts manufacturing facility on site from 1967 until 1987. Waste handling practices resulted in ground water and soil contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. After additional site investigation, EPA determined that the site did not threaten human health and the environment and the site does not require cleanup. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1995 after determining that ground water beneath the site meets federal standards for drinking water. Precision Metal Industries, a sheet metal manufacturer, currently operates at the site.
Updated 10/2013

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Woodbury Chemical Co. (Princeton Plant)
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The 5-acre Woodbury Chemical Co. (Princeton Plant) Superfund site is located in Princeton, Florida. The Woodbury Chemical Company has formulated, distributed and sold fertilizers and pesticides at the site since 1975. Following a 1979 chemical spill at the site, the Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management found high levels of contamination in on- and off-site drinking water wells. EPA sampling also identified contamination in soil and ground water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. The Woodbury Chemical Company excavated and removed contaminated soil in the area of the spill. EPA’s June 1992 final cleanup plan required no further action for the soil and monitoring only for the ground water. Ground water monitoring results showed that the site posed no significant risk to public health. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1995. Woodbury Chemical Company and a farm supply store continued operations on site during cleanup activities. The site is in use as a salvage yard and a vehicle maintenance/repair shop. A development company purchased the site property in 2005, but has not begun any construction efforts.
Updated 5/2014

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Yellow Water Road
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The 14-acre Yellow Water Road Superfund site is located in Baldwin, Florida. In the late 1940s, Robert Tyler purchased the property, formerly a dairy farm, with plans for commercial development. In 1981, the American Environmental Energy Corporation, the American Electric Corporation and the American Environmental Protection Corporation joined together to start a chemical and electrical transformer disposal facility at the site. In the process, many chemical liquids spilled onto the soil. The facility operated without a permit and in 1984, Duval County cited the companies for permit violations. EPA removed transformers and chemical holding tanks from the property and added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in June 1986. Official cleanup plans, released in 1990 and 1992, outlined EPA’s course of action. Cleanup activities included neutralizing contaminated soil, monitoring ground water quality and restricting well water use in the area. Cleanup activities concluded in 1996 and the EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1999. The site remains in continued use as grazing land for cattle. The remaining portions of the property are zoned for industrial use.
Updated 10/2013

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