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Sites in Reuse in Illinois

Beloit Corp.

The 175-acre Beloit Corp. Superfund site is located in the Village of Rockton, Illinois. Two operations previously operated at the site: a wet-end paper-making machine manufacturing plant and a research and development facility for designing and demonstrating the machines to prospective customers. Manufacturing activities on the site resulted in the contamination of area soil and ground water. Ground water contamination migrated off site toward the Rock River and impacted private residential water wells in the Blackhawk Acres subdivision just to the east of the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Manufacturing activities ceased on the site when Beloit Corporation filed for bankruptcy. Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) required the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) to establish the ground water pump-and-treatment system in 1996. EPA’s cleanup plan in 2004 included the operation of the ground water pump-and-treatment system and implementation of institutional controls to prohibit the installation of potable water wells on the site. IEPA has operated the treatment system since 2002. Monitored natural attenuation of the off-site portion of the plume will continue until the contaminant concentrations are below ground water standards. A lubricant manufacturer relocated some of its distribution and field support operations to the site in 2008 and has significantly upgraded the facility.
Updated 2/2013

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Circle Smelting Corp.

The Circle Smelting Corporation site is located in Beckemeyer, Illinois. A zinc refinery operated on site from 1904 until 1994. Site operators discarded residual metals, coal cinders and slag from the smelting process in piles on the 28-acre property. These disposal practices resulted in elevated concentrations of lead, zinc, cadmium, nickel and copper in the soil. In 1996, EPA proposed the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The potentially responsible party (PRP) entered into an agreement with EPA in 1997 to clean up the former smelter property and nearby affected residential areas. Under the 1997 Administrative Order on Consent, the PRP investigated the nature and extent of the hazardous substances from the former smelter operations and removed site contaminants to EPA's standards. Cleanup activities began in 1998 and are still underway. Thanks to successful cleanup activities at the site, a local trucking company was able to purchase a portion of the property and pave it for use as a parking lot. A Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) signed in 1999 between the trucking company and EPA made the sale of that portion of the site possible. The PPA limits the company's liability in exchange for sharing the costs of cleanup.
Updated 2/2013

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Depue/New Jersey Zinc/Mobil Chemical Corp.
Site photo

The DePue/New Jersey Zinc/Mobil Chemical Corp. Superfund site is located in the Village of DePue, a small town in Bureau County, Illinois. The site spans 950 acres and includes the shores of DePue Lake and the Illinois River. The site also borders the DePue-Donnely Wildlife Management Area. Starting in 1903, New Jersey Zinc operated zinc smelting facilities on a stretch of former farmland. Automobile and appliances industries used the zinc produced by the smelters. Due to a growing demand for fertilizers, New Jersey Zinc constructed additional facilities in 1967 to produce phosphate-based fertilizers. The Mobil Chemical Corp. leased the phosphate fertilizer plants in 1972, and then purchased the plants in 1975. The Illinois Department of Environmental Protection (IEPA) regularly inspected the site throughout the 1980s, and found heavily contaminated surface water and ground water. When contamination finally exceeded federal water and air quality standards, EPA began conducting site inspections. Former owners and operators of the site, including ExxonMobil and CBS Corporation agreed to clean up the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in May 1999. From 1995 to 2000, the responsible parties, under IEPA oversight, constructed a water treatment plant. It has removed at least 229,000 pounds of contaminants, and it continues operating today. The parties also removed heavily-contaminated soils, and fenced off a portion of the site. EPA and the companies continue working to clean up affected properties around the former smelting plant and DePue Lake. The Illinois Department of Natural Resources discourages consumption of fish from DePue Lake. The Village of DePue remains inhabited with some commercial and public use establishments, including a school, post office, general store and bank. The community expressed interest in developing the area as an ecological and recreational attraction. The Village used an SRI Pilot Grant to finalize a reuse plan for the site in 2004. Today, the Village hosts festivals at DePue Lake, and the National Power Boat Racing Association uses the lake for national races.
Updated 2/2014

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DuPage County Landfill/Blackwell Forest Preserve
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The 40-acre DuPage County Landfill / Blackwell Forest Preserve Superfund site is located within the 1200-acre Blackwell Forest Preserve in Warrenville, Illinois. The landfill, established with the goal of creating a hill to serve as a recreational amenity, accepted 2 million cubic yards of wastes between 1965 and 1973. Known as Mt. Hoy, the resulting mountain of waste and soil rises 150 feet above the original ground surface. EPA identified contamination in ground water at the site. As a result, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. EPA’s cleanup plan included repairing and ensuring the integrity of the landfill cap, installing an extraction system, treating and disposing of the landfill leachate, installing additional landfill gas vents, and conducting long-term monitored natural attenuation of ground water. Institutional controls restrict land and ground water use at the site. The site functions as a recreation area, featuring restored native prairie vegetation, picnic areas, trails, an observation area and a snow tubing run on Mt. Hoy. Other recreational and educational activities, including two lakes, an archery range and urban stream research facility are located adjacent to the site within the larger Blackwell Forest Preserve.
Updated 2/2013

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Galesburg/Koppers Co.

The 105-acre Galesburg/Koppers Company Superfund site is located in Galesburg, Illinois. Since 1907, operators at the site have treated railroad ties. Past waste practices led to contamination of soil and ground water in and around the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included treatment of contaminated soil and ground water. Wood treatment operations continue on site.
Updated 10/2013

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H.O.D. Landfill Alternative Energy Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The 121-acre H.O.D. Landfill Superfund site in Antioch, Illinois, includes a former landfill area and 70-acres of undeveloped land that served as a buffer for the landfill. From 1963 to 1984, the landfill accepted municipal and industrial wastes. In 1984, Waste Management closed the landfill at the site and placed a clay cap over the landfill. Landfill operations resulted in ground water contamination and in 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The site’s cleanup included repairs to the landfill cap and upgrades to the landfill’s gas and leachate extraction system. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) also began monitoring ground water at the site and implemented land use restrictions on the site property. Initial site reuse discussions began in the community in 1998. The PRPs completed cleanup in 2001. EPA began working with the community in 2002 to assess the reuse potential of the site and create a reuse plan. EPA issued a Ready for Recreational Reuse Determination for the site in 2003. Due to rapid population growth in the community and the site’s location next to the Antioch Community High School, local officials favored recreational reuse for the site, including sports fields for high school and community sports league use. The school district also expressed interest in using methane gas produced by the landfill. Following the construction of a methane co-generation plant, methane gas extracted from the capped landfill supplies heat and electricity to the school. The school district purchases less electricity and gas than they would without the system in place. As the methane gas supply declines, individual turbines from the plant will be taken offline and sold or re-purposed. The school district is also investigating additional modifications to the system. Redevelopment of the site includes 12 tennis courts completed in 2005, and 30 acres of soccer, field hockey and softball facilities completed in 2008. In addition, area schools use the on-site wetlands area as an environmental education resource. The U.S. Soccer Foundation donated equipment for the new soccer fields and Waste Management donates the methane that supplies heat and electricity to Antioch Community High School.
Updated 2/2013

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Ilada Energy Co. Green Infrastructure

The 17-acre Ilada Energy Co. Superfund site is located next to the Mississippi River levee in a rural area southeast of East Cape Girardeau, Illinois. In 1942, the federal government built and operated a tank farm at the site. Several companies operated the tank farm until 1981. Ilada Energy Company purchased the site in 1981. The firm constructed additional tanks and structures at the site and operated a waste oil reclamation facility. In the 1980s, site investigations identified contaminated sludge, soil, liquid oil waste and ground water resulting from improper storage, use and disposal of waste oil. Ilada Energy Company ended operations at the site in 1983. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. The Site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted cleanup activities, including the removal of all tanks and their contents, piping, structures, debris and contaminated soil. The PRPs completed the removal activities in 1991. In 2001, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. The current site owner purchased the site in 2006 and uses the site for recreational activities. The U.S. Forest Service also maintains a portion of the forest located on site.
Updated 2/2013

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Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (Load-Assembly-Packing Area) Green Infrastructure

The 22-square-mile Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (Load-Assembly-Packing Area) (JOAAP LAP Area) site is part of the JOAAP NPL facility. From the early 1940s through 1977, loading, assembling and packaging of high explosive artillery shells, bombs, mines and small arms ammunition took place at the site. Other activities included testing of ammunition, washout and renovation of shells, and burning and demolition of explosives. These activities resulted in soil and ground water contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. The Illinois Land Conservation Act of 1995 allowed the U.S. Army to transfer portions of the site to various federal, local and state parties. In 1997, the U.S. Army completed the first transfer of 15,089 acres of the site that did not require cleanup to the U.S. Forest Service. The U.S. Forest Service used the land to create the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie. The Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie provides recreational, educational and agricultural opportunities for the local community and has also created habitat for native wildlife populations. In 2005, the Army transferred an additional 2,600 acres for incorporation into the prairie. In 2000, the U.S. Army transferred 1,300 acres of the site to the State of Illinois for development of an industrial park. In the same year, CenterPoint Properties began construction of an industrial park and intermodal rail facility. The U.S. Army transferred an additional 218 acres of cleaned up site property to CenterPoint Properties in 2001 for the industrial park. The intermodal rail facility opened in 2002 and the U.S. Army transferred an additional 13 acres in 2003. The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 150 Apprenticeship & Skill Improvement Training Center opened at the industrial park in 2007. The U.S. Army also transferred 982 acres of the site to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for development of the Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery. The VA dedicated the cemetery in 1999. In 2002, the U.S. Army transferred 455 acres to Will County for use as a municipal landfill. The landfill opened in 2004. The U.S. Army completed cleanup activities at the site in 2008. Long-term ground water monitoring is ongoing.
Updated 2/2013

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Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (Manufacturing Area)

The 14-square-mile Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (Manufacturing Area) (JOAAP MFG area) site is part of the JOAAP NPL facility. From the early 1940s through 1977, manufacturing of chemicals for munitions, propellants and explosives took place at the site. The production facilities occupied the northern portion of the site and storage facilities for explosives occupied the southern portion of the site. Chemical storage and manufacturing resulted in the contamination of soil and ground water at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. The Illinois Land Conservation Act of 1995 allowed the U.S. Army to transfer portions of the site to various federal, local and state parties. In 1997, the U.S. Army completed the first transfer of 15,089 acres of the site that did not require cleanup to the U.S. Forest Service. The U.S. Forest Service used the land to create the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie. The Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie provides recreational, educational and agricultural opportunities for the local community and has also created habitat for native wildlife populations. In 2005, the U.S. Army transferred an additional 2,600 acres for incorporation into the prairie. In 2000, the U.S. Army transferred 1,300 acres of the site to the State of Illinois for development of an industrial park. In the same year, CenterPoint Properties began construction of an industrial park and intermodal rail facility. The U.S. Army transferred an additional 218 acres of cleaned up site property to CenterPoint Properties in 2001 for the industrial park. The intermodal rail facility opened in 2002 and the U.S. Army transferred an additional 13 acres in 2003. The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 150 Apprenticeship & Skill Improvement Training Center opened at the industrial park in 2007. The U.S. Army also transferred 982 acres of the site to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for development of the Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery. The VA dedicated the cemetery in 1999. In 2002, the U.S. Army transferred 455 acres to Will County for use as a municipal landfill. The landfill opened in 2004. The U.S. Army completed cleanup activities at the site in 2008. Long-term ground water monitoring is ongoing.
Updated 2/2013

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Kerr-McGee (Reed-Keppler Park)
Site photo

The Kerr-McGee (Reed-Keppler Park) Superfund site is one of four sites associated with radioactive waste contamination in West Chicago, Illinois. The site includes 11 acres of a larger 90-acre area. The 90-acre property operated as a sand and gravel quarry in the late 1800s. The City of West Chicago purchased the area from the local railroad company in the early 1930s and used it as a community park with a small swimming pool constructed in the 1950s. The area also contained a small municipal landfill. From the 1930s until 1974, the municipal landfill accepted waste materials, including radioactive tailings from the nearby Rare Earths Facility. Site operators used the waste materials to cover the landfill and provide fill in the surrounding park. While fencing surrounded the landfill area in the 1970s, investigations at the park in the 1980s found small areas of contamination scattered across the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. In 1993, site investigations identified additional soil and ground water contamination. Prior to cleanup activities, the local community had expressed interest in redeveloping the property as an aquatics center. EPA worked with the local park district to perform a more focused investigation in the proposed development area. EPA, the Park District and site stakeholders identified potential areas of contamination and modified building plans for the aquatic center to meet site remedial needs. Construction began in 1993 and the Prairie Oaks Family Aquatic Center opened on a portion of the site in 1995. Cleanup activities at the site between 1997 and 2000 removed all contaminated soil. In 2010, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. The site can accommodate unrestricted use. The redeveloped Reed-Keppler Park now features various sports fields, a skateboard park, two playgrounds, a concession stand and pavilions, a 25-acre nature sanctuary, a dog park and parking. The park is also home to the West Chicago Park District Wildcat Youth Football League. Collaboration between EPA and stakeholders has resulted in the successful remediation and reuse of this site, which provides valuable recreational opportunities for the community.
Updated 2/2013

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Kerr-McGee (Sewage Treatment Plant) Green Infrastructure

The Kerr-McGee (Sewage Treatment Plant) Superfund site is located in West Chicago, Illinois. The site includes the 25-acre West Chicago Sewage Treatment Plant and about 1.2 miles of river sediments, banks and floodplain soils. The City of West Chicago built the West Chicago Sewage Treatment Plant in 1919. Site operators at the Rare Earths Facility (later Kerr-McGee) hauled the facility’s radioactive waste materials to the treatment plant, causing contamination of the plant. During 1986 and 1987, Kerr-McGee conducted voluntary cleanup activities to allow the city to expand the treatment plant, but further investigations found additional radioactive waste contamination. As a result, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Site investigations began in 1993. The cleanup activities for the river portion of the site included ecological restoration activities to restore the character and function of habitats impacted by cleanup activities. The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County owns the majority of land along the river portion of the site. EPA worked with the Forest Preserve District to share technical expertise and guidance related to achieving restoration goals. The Forest Preserve also recognized opportunities to help fund restoration activities at the site. Land use along the river portion of the site includes primarily recreational uses. The ecological health and recreational use of the river has greatly increased as a result of cleanup and restoration activities.
Updated 2/2013

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Matthiessen and Hegeler Zinc Company

The 160-acre Matthiessen and Hegeler Zinc Company Superfund site is located in La Salle, Illinois. From 1858 until 1978, the site primarily housed a zinc smelting and rolling facility. Other site operations that took place at the site for short periods of time included ammonium sulfate fertilizer production, sulfuric acid production and coal mining. La Salle Rolling Mills continued operations on the site until the firm’s bankruptcy in 2001. Site investigations found that slag piles remaining on site from smelting activities contained contamination. Investigations also identified contamination in sediment and surface water of the Vermilion River. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2003. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) removed oil-contaminated waste piles, asbestos and storage tanks from the site. They also collected contaminated waste material for disposal at an off-site facility. In 2009, EPA conducted a time-critical removal action to demolish a building on site that contained contamination. The Carus Chemical Company, the remaining active business on site, continues chemical manufacturing on a portion of the site. The firm employs about 100 people. Carus Chemical Company agreed to perform additional studies on a portion of the site and EPA is completing studies on the remainder of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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NL Industries/Taracorp Lead Smelter

The NL Industries/Taracorp Lead Smelter Superfund site is located in Granite City, Illinois. NL Industries operated a battery reclamation facility and secondary lead smelter at the site from the turn of the century until 1983. The site’s main facility area includes 16 acres, but the site also includes additional areas affected by the spread of contamination via smelter stack emissions. Lead contamination moved throughout 100 square blocks in three cities. The contamination affected about 1,600 residences, including approximately 150 areas where contaminated battery chips were used to fill in low-lying areas. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. From 1993 until1998, EPA used Superfund funds to pay for the cleanup of over 700 properties. Then EPA entered into an agreement with the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) to fund and complete the cleanup. Hence, under EPA’s oversight, the PRPs cleaned up an additional 800 residences and dozens of driveways, alleys and parking lots from 1998 until 2000. The PRPs disposed of some of these excavated materials at an off-site facility and some on the 3.2-acre slag pile located on site at the main facility prior to capping it. The PRP disposed of the remainder at an off-site facility. Taracorp continues to own a portion of the site property. BV&G Transport and State Street Warehouse (formerly Rich Oil and Trust 454) continue to occupy the main facility and the former smelter property. An intermodal terminal occupies a portion of the area affect by the site in Venice, Illinois. Residential use continues on portions of the site.
Updated 2/2013

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Petersen Sand & Gravel
Site photo

The 120-acre Petersen Sand & Gravel Superfund site is located north of Libertyville, Illinois. Raymond Petersen purchased the land in 1952 to mine sand and gravel. Between 1955 and 1958, dumping of non-hazardous wastes, solvents and paint wastes in buried drums in a 120-acre area of the northern portion of the quarry on site took place. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) inspected the site in 1971 and ordered it closed because of illegal dumping. The site consists of three disposal areas that are located in the quarry, just east of the Des Plaines River. Site activities resulted in the contamination of area soil, sediment and ground water. In 1977 and 1983, the site owner worked to remove contamination from the site. However, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA conducted investigations at the Site and determined that the cleanup conducted by the site owner was sufficient. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1991. The successful cleanup of the site enabled Independence Grove Forest Preserve in 2002 to create a 115-acre lake and establish an education center, amphitheater and gift shop for summer vacationers. Outdoor enthusiasts now boat and swim in the newly created lake and along the beaches at the Independence Grove Forest Preserve.
Updated 2/2013

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Savanna Army Depot Activity Green Infrastructure

The 13,062-acre Savanna Army Depot Activity (SVDA) Superfund site is located in Carroll and Jo Daviess counties, Illinois. The site lies on the eastern bank of the Mississippi River, about seven miles north of Savanna, Illinois. Beginning in 1917, the U.S. Army used the site as a proof and test facility for artillery weapons and ammunition. Operations expanded to include the storing of ordnance as well as the loading and renovating of shells and bombs. In 1921, the site transitioned into operating as a depot facility. The facility on site handled, processed and stored munitions, explosives and industrial chemicals. Renovation and loading of artillery shells and bombs began in the 1930s and occurred intermittently until the facility closed in 1995. Operations at the site caused contamination of soil, ground water, surface water and sediment. The U.S. Army and the U.S. Department of Defense continue to conduct site investigation and cleanup activities at the site under the oversight of EPA and the state. In 2003, the U.S. Army transferred 3,000 acres of the site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for use as part of the Upper Mississippi Valley Wildlife and Fish Refuge. The U.S. Army transferred additional acres in 2004. The refuge includes 9,000 acres of the site. The U.S. Army plans to transfer portions of the industrial area to the Local Reuse Authority (LRA). Following the completion of cleanup, the U.S. Army will transfer additional portions of the industrial area to the LRA for industrial and commercial development and will transfer additional portions of the site to the Upper Mississippi Valley Wildlife and Fish Refuge. Site investigations are ongoing.
Updated 2/2013

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Woodstock Municipal Landfill

The 50-acre Woodstock Municipal Landfill Superfund site is located in Woodstock, Illinois. From 1935 to 1958, the site served as a local dump and open burning area. The City of Woodstock acquired the site and from 1958 until 1975 the city used the site to dispose of municipal and industrial wastes. EPA inspected the site in 1985 and identified ground water and surface water contamination as well as contamination in surrounding wetland areas. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities took place at the site between 1999 and 2000 and included removal of contaminated wetlands, processing of stockpiled site soils, installation of a protective landfill cap, re-grading and contouring of the site, reseeding and revegetation. Monitoring and maintenance of the integrity of the landfill cap and wetlands restoration took place in 2008. Following the completion of cleanup activities, the local community developed a recreational reuse plan for the site. A sports complex, which includes six new soccer fields and a parking lot, opened on a portion of the site in 2007. The complex provides much-needed recreational opportunities for the entire Woodstock community.
Updated 2/2013

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