Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

Superfund


   

Sites in Reuse in Michigan

Aircraft Components (D & L Sales)

The 17-acre Aircraft Components (D & L Sales) Superfund site is located next to the Paw Paw River in Benton Harbor, Michigan. Originally, the site included five interconnected buildings as well as various other brick structures and illegally dumped tires, household appliances and other items. Several manufacturing companies used on-site buildings for their operations until the mid-1950s. Aircraft Components, Inc., an airplane parts resale business, then occupied the site. Aircraft Components bought and sold World War II-era military aircraft parts and used the site as a warehousing, storage and shipping center. Some of the aircraft parts contained radioactive materials. D&L Sales, Inc. purchased the site in the early 1990s. Site investigations identified deterioration of some of the aircraft parts, raising a concern that the radioactive materials could leak out. EPA conducted emergency cleanup activities at the site in 1995, including installation of a gate and fencing, boarding up of on-site buildings, posting of warning signs, covering piles of radioactive materials and consolidation of waste materials. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. From 1996 until 2000, EPA, the state and the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup activities at the site, including removal and disposal of radioactive materials as well as decontamination of some on-site buildings. In 2002, additional cleanup took place at the site, including removal and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and sediment and ground water treatment. The site’s PRP treated ground water until 2004. EPA then began ground water monitoring, which is currently ongoing. The PRP conducted additional ground water treatment in 2007 and 2008. Today, the site is part of a community-wide development project. The site includes a portion of a golf course. In 2010, EPA amended a portion of the cleanup plan to allow for residential development on a portion of the site. EPA is working with the developer to put land use restrictions in place and to ensure that development of residential condominium complexes can safely take place at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Allied Paper, Inc./Portage Creek/Kalamazoo River

The Allied Paper, Inc./Portage Creek/Kalamazoo River Superfund site is located in the counties of Allegan and Kalamazoo in Michigan. The site includes 80 miles of the Kalamazoo River, adjacent river banks and formerly impounded floodplains, a 3-mile stretch of Portage Creek, five landfills and one paper mill property. EPA is investigating four other paper mills to determine if they are contributing contamination to the site. The paper mill and the landfills on site discharged and disposed of contaminated paper residuals into Portage Creek and the Kalamazoo River, resulting in soil and sediment contamination. The State of Michigan identified contaminated river sediments in 1971 during routine sampling activities. A number of initial cleanup activities took place in the disposal areas to reduce additional contamination releases into the river and creek. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. While EPA continues investigating the extent of contamination at the site, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) have conducted three time-critical cleanup actions which included excavating contaminated sediment and disposing of it at off-site permitted landfills. In addition, the PRPs and EPA have completed cleanup, including stabilization, capping and installation of ground water monitoring systems, at four of the five landfills. Redevelopment planning for the Plainwell Mill property began in 1998. In 2006, the City of Plainwell purchased portions of the site where paper mills formerly operated. The portions of the paper mills area are now listed on the National Historic Registry. EPA provided reuse planning assistance to support the City's evaluation of reuse opportunities in 2008. Redevelopment work began in 2010, when the City of Plainwell and Conestoga-Rovers & Associates (CRA) entered into an agreement for the redevelopment of the 36-acre former paper mill. CRA relocated its U.S. Construction headquarters to the site in 2012, relocating 50 jobs to the site. The City of Plainwell completed a $1.7 million renovation of the former de-watering building for the purpose of housing its Public Safety Department. The City is currently working on plans to move City Hall to the site and has obtained a grant to expand parking for employees at the site. Local artists are using some of the salvaged materials from the site to create a sculpture near the new main entrance into the mill complex. CRA and city officials remain focused on filling the property with various residential and commercial facilities.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Anderson Development Co.

The 12-acre Anderson Development Co. Superfund site is an active chemical manufacturing facility in Adrian, Michigan. From 1970 to 1979, Anderson Development Company (ADC) produced highly toxic chemicals at the site. Site operators released discharges from the manufacturing processes to surface water and air, causing widespread contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA and the state developed a cleanup and monitoring program for the site and surrounding off-site residences, which included providing drinking water to affected citizens. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup activities at the site and off-site residences under EPA and state oversight. Activities included cleanup of the interior and exterior of homes, sampling within homes, treatment of contaminated soil and sediment on site, and extension of the public water supply. The PRP completed cleanup in 1993. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1996. ADC continues operations on site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Avenue "E" Ground Water Contamination

The 435-acre Avenue “E” Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in Traverse City, Michigan. The site includes an active U.S. Coast Guard Air Station and surrounding residential areas. Since 1943, the U.S. Navy has conducted industrial operations on site using oils, lubricants, paint, gasoline and volatile solvents. Improper handling, direct dumping and spills contaminated site ground water. In 1980, private residences near the station reported well water contamination. After investigating the cited reports, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. Working with the State of Michigan, the U.S. Coast Guard led site cleanup activities, including the installation of facilities to pump and treat ground water. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2007. The U.S. Coast Guard continues to use the site as a functioning air station while off-site ground water monitoring continues.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

Bendix Corp./Allied Automotive
Site photo

The 36-acre Bendix Corp./Allied Automotive Superfund site is located in St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan. The site existed as farmland until 1939, when Nylen Products Corporation developed the 36 acres as an iron casting foundry and machine shop. The Bendix Corporation purchased the Nylen facilities in 1952. Bendix sold the facilities to Allied Chemical/Allied Signal Inc. in 1983 and Allied Chemical/Allied Signal Inc. then sold the facilities to the current owner, the Robert Bosch Corporation, in 1996. The Robert Bosch Corporation demolished the foundry in 2008, but the brake manufacturing facility remains in operation. Contamination at the site most likely originated in the 1950s and 1960s, when industrial operations disposed of oil-based cutting fluids, process chemicals, solvents and wastewater in unlined lagoons. These waste handling practices resulted in both on-site and off-site ground water contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. EPA selected a cleanup for the site in 1997 which included monitored natural attenuation of ground water contamination. In 2009, EPA added soil vapor extraction (SVE) and vapor phase treatment to the cleanup plan to control the source of contamination for the eastern ground water plume, and added a ground water extraction and treatment system to control the source of contamination for the western plume. Treatment and monitoring are ongoing at the site. Restrictions prohibit the use of ground water in contaminated areas. The manufacturing plant has remained active during cleanup, and modern waste handling practices ensure the proper disposal of industrial by-products.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Burrows Sanitation

The 10-acre Burrows Sanitation Superfund site is located in Hartford, Michigan. From 1970 to 1977, site operators disposed of plating sludge, waste coolants and oils at the site. Site operators dumped these wastes in unlined lagoons and at other spill areas on the site. In 1976, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) conducted sampling at the site. The sampling results verified contamination of the area ground water, surface water, soil and sediments with heavy metals and several volatile organic compounds (VOCs). EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. A group of potentially responsible parties, as part of a July 1984 removal action, agreed to remove sludge and contaminated soils from various areas of the site. EPA and MDNR excavated an additional 320 cubic yards of surface soils and sediments for transfer to an off-site disposal facility. An additional cleanup activity included the construction and operation of a ground water extraction and treatment system to treat a small plume of contaminated ground water. Ground water treatment continued from August 1992 until December 1995. MDNR continues to monitor private ground water wells near the site. EPA classified the site as Sitewide Ready for Anticipated Use (SWRAU) on January 11, 2008 and completed a reuse assessment for potential future site uses in January 2010.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Butterworth #2 Landfill
Site photo

The Butterworth #2 Landfill Superfund site is located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The site includes 120 acres along the Grand River. From 1950 until 1967, the City of Grand Rapids operated the landfill as an open dump and later as a sanitary landfill. Landfill operations resulted in contamination of ground water and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted cleanup activities, including capping the landfill and installing ground water monitoring wells at the site. In 2002, the City of Grand Rapids began to discuss possible future uses for the site. To convert the site into a public recreation area, the City of Grand Rapids worked with EPA to develop a reuse plan that would ensure the protectiveness of the site’s remedy and allow opportunities for multiple recreational uses, including sports fields, walking and biking trails, and a skate park. The city held community meetings in 2005 and 2006 and continues to work with the local community and recreation organizations to execute the reuse plan. In 2009, the city completed a small bike trail across the site. EPA and the city have also worked together to allow access to the on-site road for a local marathon running race. Currently, EPA is working with the city to assess the possibility of constructing a solar energy generation facility on part of the site. EPA and the city are working with property owners to finalize restrictions to allow for this type of reuse. Planning is ongoing and will include community participation prior to the start of development.
Updated 9/2013

For more information:

Folkertsma Refuse

The Folkertsma Refuse Superfund site is located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Beginning in the mid-1960s, the site accepted a variety of wastes, including foundry sand and construction debris. After changing ownership several times, the landfill closed in 1972 and a wood pallet business began operation at the site. EPA conducted an investigation in 1984 and found contamination in ground water, sediment and landfill materials. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted cleanup activities at the site from 1991 until 1994. Cleanup activities included excavation of contaminated sediment and placement of the sediment in the landfill. The PRPs then constructed a clay cap over the landfill. The wood pallet repair and manufacturing business relocated to an on-site area north of the landfill. The relocation enabled the firm to continue to operate during and after cleanup activities. The business continues operations at the site. The site’s PRPs continue to conduct site inspections as well as ground water and surface water monitoring.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

H & K Sales

The H & K Sales Superfund site, also known as the Belding Warehouse site, is located in downtown Belding, Michigan. The site includes a warehouse on Bridge Street. In 1994, H & K Sales, Inc. rented the warehouse space. The firm stored its merchandise in the warehouse, including World War II-era aircraft parts. Some of the parts, such as gauges and meters, contained glow-in-the-dark paint with small amounts of radium-226. Due to the potential health threats posed by the radium-226 levels inside the warehouse building, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. EPA removed the radioactive and contaminated items and disposed of them at off-site facilities. EPA completed cleanup activities at the site in 1997. Following the completion of cleanup, EPA returned the warehouse to H&K Sales, Inc. for continued use. This quick turnaround resulted in a rapid return of the building to productive use. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1998.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

H. Brown Co., Inc.

The 4-acre H. Brown Co., Inc. Superfund site is located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. From 1961 through 1981, H. Brown Co., Inc., owned and operated a metals reclamation facility at the site. Site operations primarily included reclaiming lead from wet-cell batteries. Between 1961 and 1978, site operators disposed of 457,000 gallons of liquid waste materials directly onto the ground at the site. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Through a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) with EPA in 1998, a developer purchased the site for redevelopment. EPA designed the cleanup activities to allow the construction of three warehouses, asphalt parking areas and landscaped areas. By 1998, the developer had completed the warehouse and light industrial complex, returning the site to productive use. Currently, a variety of businesses use the warehousing, office space and parking facilities on site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Hedblum Industries

The Hedblum Industries Superfund site, a former automotive parts manufacturing plant, is located one mile southwest of Oscoda, Michigan. Between 1968 and 1972, an automobile parts manufacturing plant discharged cooling water, rinse water and 4,000 gallons of trichloroethylene onto the ground. These disposal practices caused contamination primarily in area soil and ground water. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA’s 1989 cleanup plan included the extraction, treatment and monitoring of contaminated ground water and collection and analysis of on-site soil samples. Soil analysis determined there was no need for soil cleanup. Cleanup included the installation of the ground water extraction and treatment system. However, the system did not operate effectively, allowing ground water contamination to escape complete containment. However, the addition of a 24-well ground water circulation and soil vapor extraction well system throughout the affected area has since enhanced the ground water remedy. EPA is monitoring the work. Meanwhile, institutional controls restrict use of ground water in order to help protect human health and safety. The most recent owner, an aircraft tool supply company, has operated on the site since 1985. This company is largely a mail order sales and supply operation.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Kaydon Corp.

The 40-acre Kaydon Corp. Superfund site is located in Muskegon, Michigan. White Motors Company produced engine blocks on site until 1941 when Kaydon Corporation acquired the site. Since 1941, Kaydon Corporation has manufactured bearings, ball bearings and various bearing assemblies at the site. Site operators discharged wastewater generated during manufacturing processes in on-site seepage pits and into the south branch of Ruddiman Creek. Wastewater disposal practices resulted in contamination of soil, sludge and ground water. In 1984, Kaydon Corporation began cleanup activities, including the removal of more than 1,500 cubic yards of contaminated soil and sludge and transportation of the contaminated material to an off-site facility. Since 1988, a ground water pump-and-treat system has operated to mitigate site contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Kaydon Corporation has conducted additional cleanup activities as investigations have identified additional areas of contamination. Kaydon Corporation continued manufacturing operations throughout site cleanup and presently still operates at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Kent City Mobile Home Park

The 2-acre Kent City Mobile Home Park Superfund site is located in Kent City, 20 miles north of Grand Rapids, Michigan. The site contains 75 mobile homes. In 1982, the Michigan Department of Public Health (MDPH) tested well water samples at the mobile home park and found hazardous compounds in the water. Further investigation by EPA identified buried 55-gallon drums that collected drainage fluids from a former dry-cleaning business at the site as the contamination source. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. With the assistance of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, the mobile home park owner removed the buried drums and the surrounding soil. The MDPH closely monitored ground water and private wells surrounding the site. After determining that the site no longer posed a threat to human health and the environment, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1995. Kent City residents continue living on the site in the mobile home park.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

Kysor Industrial Corp.
Site photo

The Kysor Industrial Corporation Superfund site is located in Cadillac, Michigan, within the Cadillac Industrial Park. Since 1959, Kysor Industrial Corporation has been operating an automotive parts plant on site. Operators dumped barrels of spent solvent and degreaser directly onto the ground behind the plant. This activity resulted in the contamination of soil and ground water beneath the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included removal of some soils, treatment of some soils, and ground water treatment. Operators discharge treated ground water to the Clam River. Land use controls prevent the use of contaminated ground water as a drinking water source. The Kysor Corporation continues to operate the automotive part manufacturing plant.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

Lower Ecorse Creek Dump
Site photo

The Lower Ecorse Creek Dump Superfund site includes six residential blocks on the south bank of the Ecorse River in Wyandotte, Michigan, six miles southwest of Detroit. Former operations at the site filled the wetland with waste material for development purposes. In 1989, a local resident reported that he had exposed blue-stained soil during excavation work for a new driveway. The resident also reported blue material on several nearby lots and blue material seeping into the basement of his home. The blue color in the soil resulted from contamination. EPA immediately covered the contaminated soil with clean top soil to protect human health and the environment. In 1994, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA removed the stained soil and cleaned up and repaired the damaged homes. By 2000, EPA completed excavation and restoration activities at the residential portion of the site. In 2001, EPA carried out additional cleanup activities at a 1-acre neighborhood park at the site. Monitoring and maintenance of the soil cover over the park are ongoing to make sure the park portion of the site remains safe for continued use. The park includes a playground, swing set, pavilion, basketball court and grass-covered open space for general recreational use. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2005. In 2006, commercial redevelopment of the Oak Street portion of the site began. Primarily residential land use continues at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Metal Working Shop Green Infrastructure

The 2-acre Metal Working Shop Superfund site is located in Lake Ann, Michigan. From 1974 to 1977, the site was a metal finishing workshop that used iron phosphate. Shop operators dumped rinse waters from the metal working process on the ground at a rate of 400 gallons/day. These improper disposal practices threatened ground water quality in surrounding residential areas. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990 and conducted extensive ground water and surface soil testing. The results showed that the contaminant concentrations were not high enough to pose a threat to human health and the environment. As a result, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1992. Currently, most of the site is a designated forest and woodworking occurs on a small part of the site. In 2000, the Lake Ann Camp and Retreat Center purchased the property.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

Northernaire Plating
Site photo

The 13-acre Northernaire Plating Superfund site is located in an industrial park in Cadillac, Michigan. From 1971 to 1981, Northernaire operated an electroplating facility on the site and used metal in its industrial processes. Through improper handling and faulty sewer lines, hazardous metals leaked into site soil and ground water. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA immediately began removing chemical containers, drums and sewer lines for off-site disposal at approved facilities. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality conducted ground water investigations and found that contamination from the site mixed with contaminants from a nearby facility, the Kysor Industrial Corporation, which is also a Superfund site. In 1995, EPA facilitated cleanup activities, including installation and operation of an extensive ground water extraction system, new discharge piping and a soil vapor extraction system. According to a recent report, the cleanup satisfies goals outlined for the site and no restrictions are necessary to protect human health or the environment. As a result, EPA plans to delete the site from the NPL by September 2014. A trucking company currently owns and operates the on-site facility.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

Organic Chemicals, Inc.
Site photo

The 5-acre Organic Chemicals, Inc. Superfund site is located in an industrial and commercial area of Grandville, Michigan. From 1941 until 1945, a petroleum refinery operated at the site. Several petroleum-related industries leased the site property until 1968, when Spartan Chemical Company purchased the site. Spartan Chemical Company and its subsidiary, Organic Chemicals Company, conducted solvent and chemical reclamation and manufacturing at the site from 1968 until 1991. Petroleum-related activities, chemical spills and use of on-site waste lagoons resulted in contamination of ground water and soil at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In 1994, under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) constructed a ground water extraction and treatment system. The system operated from 1995 until 1997. The PRPs then began ground water monitoring to ensure the improvement of ground water quality. In 2012, the PRPs successfully completed a pilot project to enhance the natural processes at the site that break down contaminants. Ground water monitoring is ongoing. Also, from 2001 until 2003, the PRPs removed about 5,500 cubic yards of contaminated soil and disposed of it at an off-site facility. Following Organic Chemicals Company’s bankruptcy in 1992, the site remained unused. Then, in 2006, a Grandville-based trucking company purchased the site. The company currently uses the site for industrial purposes as a truck parking center.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

PMC Groundwater
Site photo

The PMC Groundwater Superfund site is located in a former industrial area on the shores of Lake Michigan’s Little Traverse Bay in Petoskey, Michigan. The Petoskey Manufacturing Company (PMC) operated a die casting plant at the site and improperly disposed of wastes from the casting process. Improper disposal practices resulted in contamination of area ground water, soil and the town’s municipal well. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA’s cleanup plan for contaminated soil included excavation and disposal of soil as well as the installation of a soil vapor extraction system. In 1995, EPA used Superfund funding to properly abandon the contaminated municipal well and construction a new municipal well outside of the area of contamination. In 2009, the City of Petoskey removed the abandoned well completely. Monitored natural attenuation of ground water contamination continues today to monitor the effectiveness of the cleanup. EPA and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) approved deed restrictions that limit the future use of the ground water and ensure the land owners’ "due care" responsibilities for future development of the property. EPA, MDEQ, the City of Petoskey and local developers collaborated on the cleanup and redevelopment of the site and surrounding waterfront area. This collaboration and persistence, combined with the city’s visionary planning efforts and creative financing strategies, transformed the formerly-contaminated industrial zone into a mixed use residential, commercial and recreational waterfront. The site also supports new condominiums with integrated all-underground utilities, an improved road, parking and lakefront bicycle path infrastructure. The number of visitors that come to enjoy Petoskey’s lakefront scenery and recreational amenities has significantly increased in recent years. In addition, the taxable value of the site has multiplied 15 times since the PMC facility operated in the 1960s.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Roto-Finish Co., Inc.

The 7-acre Roto-Finish Co., Inc. Superfund site is located in Portage, Michigan. From 1950 to 1988, the company manufactured equipment and mechanical parts at the site and discharged wastewater into one of five on-site lagoons. In 1979, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources sampled these lagoons and found elevated levels of heavy metals. From 1979 to 1984, the Roto-Finish Company, under oversight from MDEQ, excavated the lagoons, removed visibly stained surface soils, disposed of excavated materials at an off-site landfill and placed clean material in excavated areas. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Long-term monitoring will continue as the contamination naturally degrades, and ground water use restrictions are currently in place until ground water meets drinking water standards. Currently, Central Manufacturing Services, Inc. uses the facility as a commercial warehouse.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

Tar Lake Alternative Energy
Site photo

The 189-acre Tar Lake site surrounds a shallow 4-acre pond in Mancelona Township, Michigan. From the 1882 until 1945, Antrim Iron Company operated an iron works facility and disposed of wastes in the pond, referred to as Tar Lake. A 1980 ground water analysis identified ground water contamination. In 1983, EPA added the site the National Priorities List (NPL). Beginning in 1992, EPA removed 47,000 tons of tar waste and contaminated soil and installed an interim ground water containment system. EPA completed a cleanup in 2004 and deleted the 45-acre Eastern Tailings Area (ETA) of the site from the NPL in 2005. Beginning in 1999, EPA supported the local community's efforts to identify reuse opportunities and select appropriate reuse plans for portions of the site. In 2009, Mancelona Renewable Resources (MRR) purchased a 115-acre area of the site, including the deleted ETA area. MRR plans to construct a biomass alternative energy facility on the site. EPA and MDEQ continue to work with MRR to facilitate the company’s reuse of the site. In 2010, EPA documented the completion of cleanup at 75 acres of the site purchased by MRR. In 2011, EPA deleted this 75-acre portion of the site from the NPL. Two commercial businesses also operate on 19 acres of the site and 8 acres operate as a municipal wood waste storage area. MDEQ continues to operate the ground water treatment system and conduct ground water monitoring.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Torch Lake Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The 2,700-acre Torch Lake site is located on Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula, within the Torch Lake Area of Concern. The site includes Torch Lake, the western shore of Torch Lake, the northern portion of Portage Lake, the Portage Lake Canal, Keweenaw Waterway, the North Entry to Lake Superior, Boston Pond and Calumet Lake. The site also includes tailing and slag pile deposits located along the western shore of Torch Lake, Northern Portage Lake, Keweenaw Waterway, Lake Superior, Boston Pond and Calumet Lake, as well as additional tailing piles located at Quincy Smelter, Michigan Smelter and Hubbell. Copper mining activities at the site from the 1890s until 1969 led to the deposition of mine wastes, including slag and tailings, into the surrounding surface water and soil. Site investigations found that site operators had deposited 200 million tons of copper mill tailings in Torch Lake, filling 20 percent of the lake’s total volume. These improper disposal practices resulted in surface water and soil contamination. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA’s cleanup activities included construction of a cap in 1998, slag removal activities in 2004 and partial deletions of the site from the NPL in 2002 and 2004. In 2001, EPA began working with the community to identify reuse opportunities at the site. EPA took steps to integrate future land use considerations into its remedy selection process. EPA completed construction activities in 2005. All portions of the site are suitable for reuse: 385 acres for residential land uses and 410 acres for non-residential reuse, such as commercial, ecological, recreational or open space uses. Habitat restoration activities on Torch Lake’s Gull Island include the construction of a recreation area with nature trails and a campground, and a unique outreach and monitoring program that introduces local high school students to biodiversity and soil fertility studies. Residential redevelopment on the Hubbell/Tamarck City portion of the site is underway. Additionally, redevelopment has resulted in several residential developments on site, including the communities of Isle-Royale, Dollar Bay, Mason Sands and Point Mills. A 2008 reuse plan outlined plans for a 25-acre portion of the site known as Quincy Smelter, which is located within the Keweenaw National Historical Park, to be recognized as part of the Quincy Mining Company National Historic Landmark (NHL). The reuse plan includes an extension of the landmark’s historical tour and establishment of a waterfront recreational area for fishing and picnicking. EPA completed additional cleanup activities at the Quincy Smelter portion of the site in 2011 and redevelopment has not yet begun. EPA continues to provide oversight for State of Michigan and local community site monitoring efforts.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Wurtsmith Air Force Base

The 5,223-acre Wurtsmith Air Force Base site is located in Oscoda, Iosco County, Michigan. Beginning in 1923, the site operated as a military base. Gunnery practice, winter maneuvers, and aircraft landings took place on site until World War II. In 1960, the U.S. Air Force Strategic Air Command began its use of the site and established several air refueling squadrons. In 1977, the base mission at the site expanded to include the B-52 heavy, long-range bomber. In the same year, ground water sampling detected contamination in drinking water wells at the site. Additional sampling in 1979 and 1980 also detected contamination. Base operations had resulted in ground water and soil contamination at the site. In 1993, the site closed under the Base Realignment and Closure Act (BRAC). EPA and the U.S. Air Force have implemented a number of remedies at the site to address contamination, including pumping and treating ground water and installing air sparging systems. The U.S. Air Force continues to transfer portions of the site to the Oscoda Airport Authority for reuse as an industrial park and airfield. Uses include cargo shipment and maintenance of jumbo jet aircraft by a private company on site. Of the 5,223 acres, the U.S. Air Force owns 1,943 acres. The remaining portions of the site have undergone redevelopment and include a medical center, community college, residential communities and U.S. Air Force museums.
Updated 2/2013

For more information: