Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

Superfund


   

Sites in Reuse in Minnesota

Adrian Municipal Well Field

The Adrian Municipal Well Field Superfund site is located in Adrian, Minnesota and includes several municipal wells. Sampling detected ground water contamination in two of the municipal wells. The State of Minnesota closed the two contaminated wells and, in 1984 and 1985, installed two new wells outside the area of contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA investigations identified nine separate leaking underground storage tanks as potential contamination sources. In 1989, EPA transferred responsibility for the site to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, which completed site cleanup activities. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1992. The well field continues to provide water for the municipal water supply.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Arrowhead Refinery Co.
Site photo

The 10-acre Arrowhead Refinery Co. Superfund site is a former waste oil recycling facility located near the Duluth International Airport, along State Highway 53 in Hermantown, Minnesota. From 1961 until 1977, Arrowhead Refinery Company re-refined oil on the property using an acid-clay process. This process produced three waste streams: metal-contaminated acidic sludge, filter cake and waste water. Site operators disposed of the acidic sludge in a wetland that became a sludge lagoon. The company disposed of filter cake over the native peat in the wetland. Wastewater from the re-refining process discharged to a waste water ditch. These improper waste management practices resulted in soil contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. In 1990, 13 nearby residents received connection to the municipal water supply. EPA’s cleanup plan included removal and proper disposal of sludge, filter cake and contaminated soil as well as the installation, operation and maintenance of a ground water treatment system. The site is zoned for commercial use. In 2010, EPA supported a reuse assessment to assist the site owner and local government in evaluating reuse opportunities for the site. Currently, one warehouse operates on the southern portion of the site and a multi-unit storage facility operates on the northern portion of the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Baytown Township Ground Water Plume

The 7-square mile Baytown Township Ground Water Plume Superfund site is located in Washington County, Minnesota. The site consists of a contaminated ground water plume and its source area. From 1940 to 1968, a metalworking facility used the source area property. Activities at the facility contaminated ground water. In 1987, the Minnesota Department of Health detected contamination in private wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Cleanup activities, managed by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, included water treatment for public and private wells and containment and treatment of source area ground water. Land above the ground water plume includes farmland, rural residential houses, a commercial building, Lake Elmo Airport and developed areas of the City of Bayport. A convenience store (Hagberg’s Country Market), a hair salon and a gasoline filling station currently occupy the source area property.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

Boise Cascade/Onan Corp./Medtronics, Inc.
Site photo

The 183-acre Boise Cascade/Onan Corp./Medtronics, Inc. Superfund site is located in Fridley, Minnesota. From 1921 until 1961, the National Pole and Treating Company and its affiliate, Minnesota and Ontario Paper Company, treated wood at the site using creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Site operations ended in 1961. In 1964, Minnesota and Ontario Paper Company merged with Boise Cascade Company (now OfficeMax Incorporated). Soon after, the Onan Corporation bought 133 acres of the Boise Cascade property and Medtronic Corporation bought the remaining 50 acres. Both obtained the properties to build commercial and industrial manufacturing facilities. In 1979, site investigations found large quantities of creosote and PCP from past wood treating operations in soil and ground water. In 1984, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Under the State of Minnesota oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) removed contaminated soil and filled in the areas with clean soil. On the Onan portion of the site, the PRPs constructed a barrier wall to contain contaminated waste and soil during cleanup activities. On the Medtronic portion of the site, the PRPs collected and treated ground water that came into contact with contaminated soil in the on-site wastewater treatment lagoons. The PRPs then disposed of the treated ground water into the City of Fridley sanitary sewer system. The PRPs also collected and disposed of about 5,000 gallons of oil found near the primary wastewater lagoon. The PRPs completed cleanup activities in 1992. Medtronic constructed an office building and parking lot on the western portion of the site and Cummins, Inc. (formerly Onan Corporation) constructed an office building, manufacturing facility and parking lots on the eastern portion of the site. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1995. In 1999, during construction of Murphy Warehouse building and its associated parking areas and a storm water retention pond on part of the Onan portion of the site, contamination was found in soil. The PRPs removed drums and contaminated soil from the area and monitored ground water for two years. In 2009, Cummins, Inc. investigated the northeastern part of the Onan portion of the site before constructing a new facility. Investigations identified soil contamination in the area. Cleanup of the area prior to construction removed contaminated soil and left some contaminated soil in place. Cummins, Inc. constructed the new facility over the area in 2010 and 2011. The facility includes the main building, parking, utility trenches and storm water ponds. Construction also included the installation of a vapor barrier and underground venting system to protect against harmful vapors entering the building. Ground water monitoring continues at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

East Bethel Demolition Landfill Green Infrastructure
Site photo

The 60-acre East Bethel Demolition Landfill Superfund site is located in East Bethel Township, Anoka County, Minnesota. The landfill area covers 27 acres of the site. The unpermitted landfill, which sits just 1,000 feet away from a lake, accepted demolition debris and other hazardous industrial wastes throughout the 1970s. In 1981, Anoka County identified high levels of contaminants and dissolved metals in the ground water. These findings raised the concerns of neighboring residents who use ground water wells for their water supplies. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup actions, managed by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA)’s Closed Landfill Program, included the installation of a ground water extraction and treatment system, a new landfill cap and active gas venting. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1996. Currently, the MPCA maintains the site. In 2006, the MPCA improved the ground water extraction and treatment system. The MPCA maintains native grasses on a portion of the site to enhance a wildlife habitat for sandhill cranes.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

FMC Corp. (Fridley Plant) Alternative Energy
Site photo

The 18-acre FMC Corp. (Fridley Plant) Superfund site is located in Anoka County, Minnesota. From the 1940s to 1969, operations at the site generated wastes including solvents, paint sludge and plating wastes and site operators disposed of these wastes in an on-site dump. Sampling performed by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MCPA) in the early 1980s found solvent contamination in ground water, surface water and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Contaminated ground water from the site migrated into the Mississippi River, affecting the Minneapolis drinking water system. EPA’s cleanup plan involved the excavation and storage of contaminated soil in an on-site vault and the pumping and transportation of contaminated ground water to a nearby treatment plant. FMC Corporation (now BAE Systems Land and Armaments L. P. (BAE)) completed the majority of site cleanup activities by 1987. Ground water monitoring continues today to ensure the effectiveness of the cleanup. Part of the site is located within the River Road Industrial Center, also known as the BAE Facility. The 18-acre site includes 5 acres purchased by Burlington Northern Railroad in 1969 and a 13-acre area operated by BAE as open space and a containment and ground water treatment facility. Utilizing a partnership established with the Academy of Aeronautics (AMA) in 2005, EPA worked closely with the site owner and a local AMA club, the Minneapolis Piston Poppers, to make sure that the club could safely use of a portion of the site for aeromodeling. Also in 2005, Environmental Liability Transfer, Inc. purchased the BAE Facility from BAE including a portion of the site. In 2009, BAE installed a 14.7kW solar panel system at the site to generate electrical power for the site’s remedy. The solar panel system provides 30 percent of the electrical energy needed for the remediation system in the containment and ground water treatment facility. This amount of energy produced per year would equate to enough power for four average sized homes. The use of solar energy also prevents carbon dioxide from being produced and emitted into the air. The local AMA aeromodeling club continues to use part of the open space at the site as a flying field.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

General Mills/Henkel Corp.
Site photo

A private investment group purchased the General Mills/Henkel Corp. Superfund site and worked to transform the formerly contaminated site into a business incubator enterprise development program to support nearly 100 start-up businesses. For more than 45 years, General Mills operated a technical research facility on the 6.5-acre site in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota. The facility discharged over 1,000 gallons of laboratory chemicals each year directly into an on-site pit. The chemicals contaminated soil and ground water at the site. In 1984, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA delegated authority to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) to oversee site cleanup activities. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup activities, including ground water treatment and long-term monitoring, under MPCA’s oversight. BBD Holdings, Inc., a private investment group, purchased the site in 1989 and converted the existing buildings into a business area that supports the startup and growth of local small businesses. This business development program continues to play a significant role in the community's development by providing business opportunities to local residents and attracting other entrepreneurs and families to the area. A variety of businesses currently operate at the site. Long-term ground water monitoring is ongoing.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Joslyn Manufacturing & Supply Co.
Site photo

For a 60-year span beginning in the 1920s, a succession of companies operated a wood treating facility on the 30-acre Joslyn Manufacturing & Supply Co. Superfund site in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. The companies placed process wastes in waste disposal ponds, buried process sludge on site and spilled wood treating solutions onto the ground, contaminating site soil and ground water. Wood treating operations ceased at the site in 1980 and EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. EPA delegated authority to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) to oversee site cleanup activities. Site cleanup began in 1988. Cleanup activities included removing, treating and disposing of contaminated soil as well as treating contaminated ground water and removing dense non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPL). Ground water treatment, DNAPL removal and an investigation and feasibility study for an additional area of soil contamination are ongoing at the site. EPA, state agencies and Real Estate Recycling (RER), a redevelopment company specializing in previously contaminated land, worked together to make redevelopment a possibility at the site. RER purchased the site, continued cleanup and then redeveloped the site into the Twin Lakes Business Park. The site’s transformation into the Twin Lakes Business Park proceeded in three construction phases made possible by the developer’s recognition of the property’s size, valuable infrastructure, direct access to highways and the strength of Brooklyn Center’s labor force. In 2002, EPA deleted the redeveloped portion of the site from the NPL. Today, the fully leased business park provides 421,000 square feet of commercial and industrial space for a variety of tenants.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Koch Refining Company/N-Ren Corp.
Site photo

The Koch Refining Company/N-Ren Corp. Superfund site is an active oil refinery in Rosemount, Minnesota. The site covers 1,200 acres and includes the refinery and neighboring property. The Great Northern Refining Company began refining oil on site in 1955 and sold the property to Koch Refining Co. in 1969. Koch Refining Co. became Flint Hills Resources in 2002. The refinery receives crude oil by pipeline and barge and then refines the crude oil into gasoline, jet fuel, heating oil, kerosene, diesel fuel, boiler fuel, asphalt, petroleum coke, sulfur, carbon dioxide, butane and propane. Since the early 1970s, spills in the storage tank area have occurred. Site investigations identified ground water contamination. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities from 1988 until 2004 included installation of recovery wells, ground water gradient control, and soil gas extraction. Further site studies classified the site as a petroleum release site and EPA transferred the site responsibility to the Minnesota Tanks and Spills Program. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1995 and it became a state-lead site under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) program and the Underground Storage Tank (UST) program. Ground water monitoring is ongoing at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Koppers Coke
Site photo

The 38-acre Koppers Coke Superfund site in St. Paul, Minnesota, formerly housed a coking facility. From 1917 to 1979, the Koppers Company produced foundry coke and various by-products, such as coal tars and coal tar distillates. Storage and disposal practices, as well as various leaks and spills, resulted in the contamination of soil and ground water at the site. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA delegated authority to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) to oversee site cleanup activities. As part of the cleanup, MPCA required Koppers to dispose of 240,000 gallons of residue in an off-site facility and excavate and dispose of 21,600 cubic yards of contaminated soil. Ground water treatment and monitoring continues at the site today. The site’s location next to major ongoing industrial and commercial development and its proximity to transportation infrastructure spurred the Saint Paul Port Authority to clean up the site for redevelopment. The St. Paul Port Authority redeveloped the site into part of a 218-acre, high-tech industrial park called Energy Park. Energy Park, an industrial park established in 1980, includes manufacturers, commercial and office space, and residential housing. Midway Stadium is located within Energy Park, as is the Dakota Bar & Grill, which is a well-known nightly jazz spot. U.S. Bancorp, one of the major tenants, maintains a large office complex on the site property. In 2012, the businesses on the site’s portion of Energy Park employed about 1,667 people and provided an estimated $119 million in annual income to employees. Ground water monitoring is ongoing at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Kurt Manufacturing
Site photo

The 10-acre Kurt Manufacturing Superfund site is located in Fridley, Minnesota. Since 1960, Kurt Manufacturing has been operating a machining and fabricating metal components facility on site. Site operators spilled industrial solvent into a drainage pit beneath the company’s metal shavings bin storage. This spill contaminated soil and ground water below the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup activities include treating contaminated ground water, removing and treating contaminated soil, and putting land use controls in place to limit access to ground water and soils. Kurt Manufacturing continues to operate a precision machining and metal fabrication facility on site.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

LaGrand Sanitary Landfill

The LaGrand Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located in LaGrand Township, Douglas County, Minnesota. Although the landfill itself only spans five acres, the entire site covers 70 acres. Between 1974 and 1984, the landfill accepted municipal and industrial wastes. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) addressed the site through the state’s Closed Landfill Program. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. The MPCA and EPA issued a cleanup plan in 1992. Initial cleanup activities included long-term ground water monitoring, landfill gas venting and landfill cover maintenance. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1997. Subsequently, the MPCA installed a new landfill cap and new gas vents. In 2008, the MPCA transferred a 3-acre part of the site property to Runestone Electric for reuse as an electric substation. In 2009, the MPCA granted an easement to Great River Energy, an electrical company serving Minnesota and Wisconsin, to construct electrical power transmission lines through part of the site.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

MacGillis & Gibbs Co./Bell Lumber & Pole Co.
Site photo

The 68-acre MacGillis & Gibbs Co./Bell Lumber & Pole Co. Superfund site consists of two adjoining properties in New Brighton, Minnesota. Wood preserving facilities operated on both properties through most of the 20th century. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984, after the discovery of contaminated soil and ground water. Cleanup activities included stabilization and removal of contaminated soil, bio-treatment of contaminated soil, installation of a cap over heavily contaminated soils, and installation and operation of a ground water pump-and-treat system. By 2001, the majority of cleanup operations were complete. Since the mid-1980s, the city had been laying the groundwork necessary to redevelop the 25-acre MacGillis & Gibbs property. This effort is part of the city’s plan to revitalize a historic road that was once a main route through the Twin Cities. In 1997, the city, along with state and federal agencies, successfully negotiated a Prospective Purchaser Agreement to resolve the city’s liability concerns about obtaining the property. The site’s successful cleanup and redevelopment resulted in the development of the 32-acre New Brighton Corporate Park III. Today, the site redevelopment includes manufacturing and distribution businesses, as well as over 70,000 square feet of commercial office space, a range of retail shops and restaurants, legal and medical services, a post office, and a 120-unit condominium development.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Morris Arsenic Dump

The Morris Arsenic Dump Superfund site is located in Morris, Stevens County, Minnesota. In the early 1940s, Stevens County buried about 1,500 pounds of surplus arsenic-based pesticide in a gravel pit on site. The Minnesota Department of Transportation built a highway through the gravel pit in 1978. After inconclusive ground water and soil testing, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency requested assistance from EPA. EPA found traces of arsenic in ground water samples and added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Further testing was unable to determine whether the arsenic in the ground water came from buried pesticides or from arsenic naturally found in the Minnesota region. Since tested arsenic concentrations fell within the naturally occurring arsenic level range, EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1986. Part of U.S. Highway 59 remains in use on the site.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

NL/Taracorp/Golden Auto
Site photo

The NL Industries/Taracorp/Golden Auto Superfund site in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, has a long history of metal refining and smelting. The site supported metals fabrication operations until 1903, when secondary smelting activities began. The secondary smelter operated on site from 1940 until 1982, recovering lead from lead plates, battery fragments and lead containers. The waste disposal activities at the smelter and the metal refining business resulted in high lead levels in the air, soil and ground water. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Restrictions limited access to the area while cleanup crews removed contaminated soil, refilled and revegetated the area, cleaned or demolished buildings, and installed a protective asphalt cover. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1998, but ground water monitoring continues. In 2009, EPA made a determination that the site met the requirements for Site-Wide Ready for Anticipated Use, opening the door to site reuse. Real Estate Recycling and its development subsidiary, Highway 7 Business Center LLC, currently own both properties. Today, the site is home to the Highway 7 Business Center, which consists of an industrial/ commercial office/ warehouse building with associated parking, drive and green space areas.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Nutting Truck & Caster Co.
Site photo

The 8.6-acre Nutting Truck & Caster Co. Superfund site is located in Faribault, Minnesota. Between 1891 and 1984, Nutting Truck & Caster Co. manufactured and distributed casters, wheels, hand trucks and towline trucks at the site. From 1959 until 1979, the company operated the site as a foundry waste disposal area, using a seepage pit in the northwest corner of the site for disposal of waste and sludges. Soil sampling indicated contamination of surface soil at the site. In 1980, the company removed waste materials and contaminated soil from the pit and then backfilled and paved the area. In 1984, the company ended its operations at the site. In the same year, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA delegated authority to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) to oversee site cleanup activities. Further site investigations identified ground water contamination resulting from former disposal practices. Cleanup activities included the construction of a ground water extraction and treatment system, which operated until 2004. Prairie Avenue Leasing Ltd. currently owns the site and leases it for commercial and light industrial purposes. Additionally, two residences have remained in use at the site throughout the cleanup process.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Oakdale Dump
Site photo

The Oakdale Dump Superfund site is located in Oakdale, Minnesota. Three separate properties make up the site: the 55-acre Abresch site, the 5-acre Brockman site and the 2-acre Eberle site. In the 1940s and 1950s, industrial and non-industrial waste dumping occurred at the three properties. In 1980, a Minnesota Pollution Control Agency investigation identified contamination in the soil of the three sites. EPA added the site to the National Properties List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal of contaminated soil and waste, treatment of soil, and collection and off-site treatment of contaminated water. Cleanup activities also include the monitoring of ground water to detect changes in ground water quality. The Abresch site contains wetlands, ponds, wooded areas and a stream. Commercial use and a wooded vacant lot make up the Brockman site. The Eberle site consists of residential properties and a city park.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

Olmsted County Sanitary Landfill Alternative Energy

The Olmsted County Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located in Oronoco, Minnesota. The City of Rochester owned and operated the 50-acre site from 1972 until 1984. The city operated the site as a landfill licensed by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. The city constructed four landfill cells at the site. The city constructed the first cell of the landfill without a liner or a system for collecting leachate. The city constructed the second cell of the landfill with a poorly constructed liner. The landfill accepted various industrial wastes, including electroplating sludge, asbestos, transformers, paint and solvents. Seeps from the landfill resulted in ground water contamination at the site. Also, an intermittent stream at the site carried contaminants during heavy rains. In 1984, the County of Olmsted assumed ownership and operation of the landfill at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The county performed site investigations from 1989 to 1993 under Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) oversight. In 1994, the county capped the landfill and installed a leachate collection system. EPA selected a plan of no further action for the site, because MPCA’s Closed Landfill Program adequately addressed the site risks. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1995. In 2008, a local model aeronautics club began using the site as an area to fly model airplanes. In 2011, MPCA signed a long-term lease with Olmstead Landfill Solar, LLC for the private development of a solar facility on one of the former waste cells at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Perham Arsenic Site

The Perham Arsenic Site Superfund site is located in Perham, Minnesota. The site occupies the southwest corner of the East Otter Tail County Fairgrounds and a nearby parcel owned by Hammers Construction Company. It consists of a six- to eight-foot deep pit and associated ground water plume that came from the pit area. From the 1930s until 1947, activities on the site included mixing arsenic with sawdust and molasses for use as a pesticide to control an outbreak of grasshoppers that had threatened crops throughout the Midwest. In 1947, a shallow pit on site served as the burial location for between 200 and 2,500 pounds of arsenic pesticide. In 1971, Hammers Construction Company purchased the property to build offices and a warehouse and installed a ground water well to provide water to the facility. Eleven employees suffered from arsenic poisoning after drinking the contaminated ground water. In response to this discovery, the City of Perham extended its municipal water supply to the facility and capped the well. Site cleanup activities included the installation of a clay cap over the pit, the connection of a school and nearby residence to the municipal water supply, the installation of a ground water treatment system, and the implementation of institutional controls to protect human health and safety. The Hammers Construction Company offices, as well as the on-site fairground properties, have continued to support commercial and recreational uses, respectively, during cleanup activities. Hammers Rental Properties currently owns the eastern portion of the property and Knuttila Financial Services owns the western portion of the property. EPA classified the site as Sitewide Ready for Anticipated Use (SWRAU) on September 9, 2010.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Pine Bend Sanitary Landfill Alternative Energy
Site photo

The 255-acre Pine Bend Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located in Inver Grove Heights, Dakota County, Minnesota. The site includes the largest open landfill in Minnesota, which opened in 1971. The landfill continues to operate on a portion of the site as a solid waste facility. Investigations identified ground water contamination at the site and in several private wells. This contamination resulted from leachate migrating from the landfill. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1994, the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) connected all residents to the public water supply and permanently sealed and abandoned private wells. The PRP has also installed a low permeability cover, a landfill gas collection system and a surface water and leachate collection system. A landfill gas collection system actively channels landfill gases to the site’s gas-to-energy production plant. The landfill continues to operate as a municipal solid waste facility in accordance with permit requirements. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1998.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

South Minneapolis Residential Soil Contamination Site

The South Minneapolis Residential Soil Contamination Superfund site is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The 1,480-acre site includes 3,500 residential properties as well as commercial, municipal and industrial areas. From 1938 to 1963, Reade Manufacturing operated an arsenic-based pesticide manufacturing facility at the site. In the manufacturing process, toxic arsenic became airborne and contaminated soils of surrounding residential neighborhoods. In 1994, the Minnesota Department of Transportation discovered high levels of arsenic when evaluating the area for road construction. The Minnesota Department of Health tested 167 homes and found high arsenic concentrations. Through the early 2000s, EPA and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture tested thousands of area properties and schools to determine the extent of arsenic contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2006 and signed an official cleanup plan for the site in 2008. In 2009, EPA received funding through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act to conduct cleanup work at the site. Cleanup activities included the excavation and restoration of 472 residential and municipal properties in ethnically and economically diverse neighborhoods. A commercial and light industrial facility currently operates on the property, and commercial businesses and homes in the area remain in use.
Updated 10/2013

For more information:

South Andover Site
Site photo

The 50-acre South Andover Site Superfund site is located in Andover, Minnesota. From 1954 until 1981, most of the properties at the site operated as waste disposal and salvage facilities. The on-site facilities stored wastes, including drums that contained inks and solvents as well as about three million tires. Facility operators also burned a large quantity of solvents and inks in open pits on site. Reportedly, transformers, drums of chemical wastes, and several thousand gallons of paint, adhesives and greases in various size containers were stored on the site, resulting in numerous spills. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Under EPA’s guidance, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) completed cleanup at the site. Cleanup activities included ground water monitoring, removal of contaminated soils, thermal treatment of some of the contaminated soils, and off-site disposal of other contaminated soils. The PRPs completed cleanup activities in 1994. Groundwater monitoring continues. In 1996 and 1997, the City of Andover acquired the site and began redevelopment activities. Redevelopment at the site extends onto neighboring properties, and includes residential uses and commercial businesses. These businesses compose the majority of the area known as Andover Station. They directly support over 500 jobs annually and contribute $9.9 million in annual employment income to the community. The pedestrian-oriented development attracts shoppers, boosting the local tax base and helping to foster a more walkable and livable community.
Updated 2/2013

Union Scrap Iron & Metal Co.
Site photo

The Union Scrap Iron & Metal Co. Superfund site is a 10,000-square foot area located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Battery recycling operations took place at the site from the early 1970s to 1983. Site operations included splitting open battery casings and dumping the contents into open pits. Battery contents then migrated from the open pits through soil into a storm sewer. In addition, storage of contaminated waste in piles on site occurred for a 10-year period. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. From 1987 to 1989, EPA conducted emergency cleanup activities at the site to remove wastes, battery debris and contaminated soil from the site and to replace excavated areas with clean fill. EPA decontaminated and demolished on-site buildings and removed contaminated material from the sewer lines. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1991. Today, the site is part of the North Washington Industrial Park and commercial businesses use the site as a parking area.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Waite Park Wells
Site photo

The 200-acre Waite Park Wells Superfund site is located in the City of Waite Park in Stearns County, Minnesota. The site includes the City of Waite Park’s municipal well field and water treatment plant, the former Electric Machinery Company property and the Burlington Northern Railroad property. From 1969 to 1977, the Electric Machinery Company operated at the site. Site operations resulted in soil and ground water contamination from waste disposal practices. In 1894, Burlington Northern constructed a railroad car maintenance facility at the site. From 1950 to 1970, the facility disposed of about 10,000 gallons per year of waste oil, paint waste and solvents at the site. About 5,000 people living within the City of Waite Park receive drinking water from the municipal wells located at the site, following the water’s treatment at the city’s water treatment facility. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA delegated authority to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) to oversee site cleanup activities. Electric Machinery Company began operating a ground water treatment system in 1988 and a soil vapor extraction remediation system in 2000. The company currently conducts long-term ground water monitoring. Burlington Northern removed a portion of the contaminated soil, treated a portion of the contaminated soil, constructed a contaminated soil storage vault and maintains the vault containing additional contaminated soil. Burlington Northern continues to conduct ground water monitoring associated with the containment vault. Following the cleanup, Burlington Northern transferred ownership of 126 acres of the site to the City of Waite Park. The city has transformed part of the area into the 42.1-acre River’s Edge Park, which features baseball and softball fields, a batting cage, ice hockey and figure skating rinks, picnic tables, a concession stand, fishing access on the Sauk River and parking. Redevelopment has taken place at another section of the site that now includes a warehouse, restaurant and office buildings within the West River Business Park. A foundry and parts casting business continues to use the former Electric Machinery building on site. The City of Waite Park’s wells and water treatment plant continue to operate on a portion of the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information:

Whittaker Corp.
Site photo

The 7.5-acre Whittaker Corp. Superfund site is located in Hennepin County, Minnesota. Beginning in the 1940s, a number of industrial and manufacturing companies operated at the site. During World War II, the site operated as a packaging facility for war materials, including antifreeze and oil for the military. In the 1950s, operations expanded to include industrial coatings production and steel distribution. Site operators stored chemicals in aboveground and underground tanks on site and industrial processes generated a variety of wastes. Site operations and waste handling practices resulted in soil and ground water contamination at the site. In 1984, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA, the state and the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) worked to take special precautionary measures during the cleanup in order to allow on-site businesses to remain in operation. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1999. Today, a variety of commercial and industrial businesses continue operations at the site.
Updated 2/2013

For more information: