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Sites in Reuse in Oklahoma

Fourth Street Abandoned Refinery

The Fourth Street Abandoned Refinery Superfund site operated as a waste oil reclamation facility from the 1940s until the early 1960s in northeast Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 because of soil and ground water contamination. Contaminants of concern included metals and organic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Cleanup actions addressed 42,000 cubic yards of contaminated sludge, soil and sediments. The cleanup supports non-residential uses. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2008. An industrial facility operates on the westernmost tract, known now as the Pipe Storage Yard. Although part of the original refinery property, another individual owns and operates on the tract. The site is still for sale and available for redevelopment.
Updated 11/2012

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Sand Springs Petrochemical Complex

The 235-acre Sand Springs Petrochemical Superfund site is located in Sand Springs, Oklahoma, in an industrial complex on the northern bank of the Arkansas River. Beginning in the 1900s, various industries operated on the site, including oil refiners. Numerous companies, including Charger Paint, Direct Fire and Baker Petrolite, continue to operate on various portions of the site. In December 1980, EPA and state agencies became concerned about possible contamination at the site. In 1984, EPA ordered the emergency removal of contained drums and tanks from a 5.5-acre portion of the site. In 1986, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) to address soil and ground water contamination and related wastes. In 1995, potentially responsible parties began and completed EPA required cleanup actions. Activities included the excavation, stabilization and disposal in an on-site landfill of 180,000 cubic yards of petroleum waste material. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2000. Between 2004 and 2006, parties excavated and removed sludge material along the banks of the Arkansas River. Operation and maintenance activities at the site continue. A rail company and the City of Sand Springs have to plans to reuse about 5 acres of the site as a rail facility. The rail facility will include an area for transferring, storing and loading shipments.
Updated 11/2012

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Tar Creek (Ottawa County)
Site photo

The Tar Creek (Ottawa County) Superfund site occupies approximately 12,600 acres in the Tri-State Mining District, which includes northeastern Oklahoma, southeastern Kansas, and southwestern Missouri. Ottawa County, Oklahoma, in particular, was the site of extensive zinc and lead mining between the early 1900s and the 1970s. Mining waste piles are located on more than 1,444 acres of the site. Approximately 19,500 people live within or in close proximity to the mining area. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Given the size of the site, EPA divided the site into five operable units (OUs). EPA has issued Records of Decision (RODs) for OU1 (1984), OU2 (1997) and OU4 (2008). OU1 addresses surface water and ground water contamination with construction of diversion structures to keep runoff from entering mine systems, plugging of mine wells and ongoing monitoring of the Roubidoux aquifer system. OU2 involved the cleanup of 2,295 residential yards and public areas and excavation of lead-contaminated soils. An OU3 removal action involved removing and properly disposing of abandoned mining chemicals on the site. OU4 remedial actions address the source materials, rural residential yard contamination, transition zone soil contamination, and contamination in water drawn from rural residential wells. The selected remedy also addresses residential relocation and sales of chat (a mining waste). Though EPA does not own any chat and will not purchase any chat, it is assisting chat sales participants, including the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma and local chat processors, as part of the site’s Superfund remedy. EPA used funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act awarded in 2009 to fund OU4 buyouts and relocations for the towns of Picher, Cardin and Hockerville. The OU4 buyout and demolition activities are completed; the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality completed the Close Out Report on November 23, 2011. Residential, commercial and public uses continue on a number of the properties cleaned up under OU2. OU4 properties currently undergoing cleanup are typically reused for agricultural or other rural use purposes.
Updated 11/2012

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Tinker Air Force Base (Soldier Creek/Building 3001)

Prior to 1941, the area now home to Tinker Air Force Base included undeveloped pasture and prairie lands. Beginning in 1941, Oklahoma City donated 960 acres of land to the Army Air Corps for the construction of the Midwest Air Depot. Renamed Tinker Field in 1942 and subsequently Tinker Air Force Base in 1948, EPA listed the base as a Superfund site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987 because of contaminated ground water, sediment, soil and surface water. The site covers about 5,000 acres and contains around 500 buildings. The focus of site investigation and cleanup efforts have included Building 3001, Pit Q-51 the North Tank Area, Soldier Creek as well as other areas. Site cleanup efforts began in the mid-1980s. Some cleanup actions continue, including the treatment of contaminated ground water in the Building 3001 area. The U.S. Air Force continues to use the site for U.S. Air Force command operations. Military and civilian personnel use Building 3001 for maintenance on aircraft, engines, components and accessories as well as administrative duties.
Updated 11/2012

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