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Sites in Reuse in Texas

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Bailey Waste Disposal Green Infrastructure

The Bailey Waste Disposal Superfund site is located about three miles southwest of Bridge City in Orange County, Texas. The site was originally part of a tidal marsh near the confluence of the Neches River and Sabine Lake. In the early 1950s, the property owner built two ponds on the site by dredging the marsh and piling the sediments to form levees surrounding the ponds. In the 1950s and 1960s, the property owner allowed part of this area to be used for industrial and municipal waste disposal. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984 to address soil and sediment contamination. Key cleanup actions included appropriately disposing of the site’s most problematic waste off site, and combining and capping the remaining waste material on site. Potentially responsible parties completed cleanup actions in 1997. These actions protected sensitive wetlands and made them safe for wildlife and recreational activities. Site inspection and maintenance activities continue.
Updated 11/2012

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Crystal City Airport

The 120-acre Crystal City Airport in Crystal City, Texas, began operating during World War II as a military installation. In 1949, the U.S. Government deeded the airport to the city. For the next 40 years, several aerial pesticide application companies conducted business on the airport property. In 1983, the state inspected the site and found over 70 drums of waste pesticides in various stages of decomposition. In 1986, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Officials subsequently closed the airport to the public in 1987. After listing the site, EPA and the State of Texas consolidated the waste and buried it in on-site disposal cells. Contaminants of concern included arsenic compounds and pesticides, specifically DDT and toxaphene. After determining that the cleanup would protect people and the environment, the Crystal City Airport reopened for use in 1990. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 1995.
Updated 11/2012

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Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant Green Infrastructure
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The Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP) is located between State Highway 43 and Caddo Lake in Karnack, Texas. The facility operated from 1942 to 1997, historically manufacturing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), rocket motors and various pyrotechnic items. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. In 1991, following approval of a federal facilities agreement, the U.S. Army began conducting environmental investigation and cleanup of LHAAP, with oversight from EPA and the state. Since then, the U.S. Army has undertaken a number of cleanup actions. Additional cleanup actions are underway, including operation of the installation’s ground water treatment system. The U.S. Army declared the LHAAP as excess property in 1997. From 1998 to 2001, all personal assets and specific installed property and buildings were liquidated and/or demolished. In 2002, the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Division began managing LHAAP as excess property. In 2000, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services (FWS) approved the establishment of the Caddo Lake National Wildlife Refuge on LHAAP. In April 2004, the U.S. Army and FWS entered into a Memorandum of Agreement that sets forth the transfer process of LHAAP acreage. The U.S. Army has since transferred 7,200 out of 8,416 acres to the FWS for the Caddo Lake National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge has been open to the public since September 2009. In addition to supporting wildlife habitat, the refuge includes a wildlife education center. FWS also uses the refuge for research.
Updated 11/2012

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North Cavalcade Street

The North Cavalcade Street Superfund site is located in an industrial, commercial and residential section of Houston, Texas. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986 because of creosote and related contamination in soil and ground water. Cleanup actions to address soil contamination included containment and capping. Cleanup actions to address ground water contamination source areas included stabilization. In 2011, EPA issued a revised cleanup plan to address the more mobile dissolved phase ground water and calls for a ground water containment remedy through natural processes. The plan did not require any remedial construction efforts. However, ground water monitoring continues. The northern ten acres of the site are available for reuse now that cleanup contractors have completed the construction of the cap over the consolidated soils. Reuse of the northern section will be limited to those areas outside the cap and cell footprint. Currently, this property is only accessible through the southern half of the site. A spice import company, El Venado, renovated an existing on site building to accommodate its spice import business. The Harris County Toll Road Authority is considering plans to extend the Hardy Toll Road in the rail right-of-way along the site’s western boundary.
Updated 11/2012

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Palmer Barge Line

The Palmer Barge Line Superfund site, a former barge-cleaning operation, covers 17 acres and is located east-northeast of the City of Port Arthur, Texas. The city used the site, along with the adjacent properties to the north and south, as a municipal landfill from 1956 to 1987. Although disposal at the landfill has long since ceased the landfill contents are still present in the on-site subsurface soils. In 1982, John Palmer, President of Palmer Barge Line, Inc. purchased approximately 17 acres from the City of Port Arthur, for the purpose of servicing and maintaining barges and marine vessels. Following bankruptcy, Wrangler Capital purchased the site in 1997. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000. Chemicals of concern include organic compounds, pesticides and metals. Cleanup actions in 2000 and 2007 included waste removal, water treatment, oil/water separation, sludge stabilization, excavation of contaminated soil, and sludge removal from wastewater above ground storage tanks. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2012. The owner is currently using the site as an industrial property.
Updated 11/2012

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Pantex Plant (USDOE) Alternative Energy

The Pantex Plant (USDOE) Superfund site occupies approximately 16,000 acres with approximately 10,000 of these acres owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and 6,000 acres leased from Texas Tech University. The plant began in 1942 as an Army Ordnance Corps facility. DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) now owns the plant. Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC operates and manages the plant. DOE began nuclear operations at the plant in 1951. Current operations include the development, testing and fabrication of High Explosive (HE) components; nuclear weapons assembly and disassembly; interim storage of plutonium and weapon components; and component surveillance. The Pantex Plant’s historical waste management practices resulted in the release of both chemical and radionuclide constituents to the environment. Contaminants of concern in ground water include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), explosives and metals. Principal pollutants in soil include explosives and depleted uranium. The major threat to human health and the environment is from impacts to ground water from on-site industrial operations. In the late 1980s, the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) initiated the Environmental Restoration Project at the Pantex Plant. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. In 2000, the DOE/NNSA succeeded DOE EM as the designated lead federal agency to investigate, assess and remediate environmental releases. DOE/NNSA is implementing cleanup under the authorities of both Superfund and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.
Updated 11/2012

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Petro-Chemical Systems, Inc. (Turtle Bayou)

The Petro-Chemical Systems, Inc. Superfund site is located in rural Liberty County, 15 miles southeast of Liberty, Texas. County Road 126 or CR 126 (previously known as Frontier Park Road) traverses the site. Site operations commenced prior to 1970 and continued until the late 1970s. Parties dumped waste oils on CR 126 and into unlined waste pits along the road. After 1974, the owner subdivided the site into 5-acre and 15-acre plots and sold them for residential development. EPA listed site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986 to address ground water and soil contamination. In 1988, EPA and the state excavated, back-filled and re-built CR 126. In 2010, EPA had the road re-surfaced. Potentially responsible parties completed soil cleanup to industrial standards in 2012. Long-term ground water monitoring continues. Due to liability concerns, the responsible party bought out and permanently relocated residents.
Updated 11/2012

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RSR Corp. (Murph Metals)
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The RSR Corp. (Murph Metals) Superfund site is in a residential and commercial area of west Dallas, Texas. The site encompasses an area approximately 13.6 square miles in size. The site is very diverse and includes large single and multi-family residential neighborhoods, multi-family public housing areas and some industrial, commercial and retail establishments. From the early 1920s until 1984, RSR operated a lead smelter and disposed of battery material and slag on the property. The smelter sent lead contaminated smog into the surrounding community. Blood lead levels in ten percent of the children living within a half mile of the smelter were above acceptable levels. In 1995, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). To better manage the cleanup of the site, EPA divided the site into five areas, or operable units (OUs). EPA and the Dallas Public Housing Authority took immediate action to remove the contaminated soil from the residential properties (OUs 1 and 2). By 2004, EPA had completed the construction of cleanup components for each OU. Cleanup of the residential properties (OUs 1 and 2) and commercial properties (OUs 3, 4 and 5) have resulted in the lowering of blood lead levels of the children that reside in the west Dallas community. Completed cleanup activities also permit additional redevelopment of the site area. In 2007, EPA deleted OU4 and Subarea 1 of OU5 from the NPL. The West Dallas Neighborhood Development Corporation formed to promote redevelopment in the West Dallas area, including the site.
Updated 11/2012

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South Cavalcade Street
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The South Cavalcade Street Superfund site occupies 66 acres of land located about three miles north of downtown Houston, Texas. National Lumber and Creosoting Company constructed and operated a wood preserving facility on the site from 1910 to 1938, at which time Wood Preserving Corporation, a subsidiary of Koppers Company, acquired the property. In 1940, Wood Preserving Corporation became a part of Koppers Company, Inc., now known as Beazer East, Inc., and operated the wood treating facility from 1940 until 1962. Koppers constructed a coal tar distillation plant in the southeastern portion of the site, which operated from 1944 to 1962. Afterward, the owner sold the property. After the discovery of creosote in the site’s subsurface, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List. Cleanup actions included capping contaminated soils. Parties designed the concrete caps, covering two areas of contaminated soils in the southeast and southwest portions of the site, for soil containment and for truck parking. The initial approach to ground water treatment included a ground water pump-and-treat system; currently, parties are evaluating other options. Pavement, buildings or storage areas cover a large portion of the site (particularly in the southern half of the site). Multiple businesses are using the site for industrial uses, including industrial products distribution, truck and heavy equipment staging and pallet supply.
Updated 11/2012

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State Marine of Port Arthur

The State Marine of Port Arthur Superfund site is a 17-acre industrial tract of land located east-northeast of the City of Port Arthur, Texas. In the 1960s and 1970s, parties used the site for municipal landfill and barge cleaning operations. In 1998, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 2001, EPA removed source materials from the site. Removal activities included waste removal, water treatment, oil/water separation, and sludge stabilization and off-site disposal. After completing the removal action, EPA determined that the site did not pose a risk to human health or the environment based on an industrial/commercial future land use scenario. The site owner is currently using the site as an industrial property for metal scrapping activities. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2012.
Updated 11/2012

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Tex Tin Green Infrastructure
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Located on the banks of Galveston Bay in Texas City, Texas, the 170-acre Tex Tin Superfund site housed copper and tin smelting facilities from the beginning of World War II until the mid-1980s. Years of non-compliance with state environmental permitting requirements resulted in the site’s referral to EPA and addition to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup actions addressed waste piles, wastewater treatment ponds, acid ponds and slag piles. Cleanup actions also focused on the nearby Swan Lake Salt Marsh Area. Following the completion of cleanup activities, EPA awarded the site a Superfund Redevelopment Pilot grant in 2001. EPA issued the nation’s first Ready for Reuse (RfR) determination for the site in 2003. The RfR determination, which the State of Texas co-signed, stated that the site was protective for commercial uses as long as specified conditions were met. Phoenix International recognized the former smelter site as an ideal location, close to an anticipated development by a large transportation services company, and purchased the site in 2005. After the transportation services company withdrew plans to develop the nearby area in 2007, Texas City Terminal Railway Co. bought the site in 2010. Thanks to the efforts of prior site owners, EPA, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and Texas City, the site remains ready for redevelopment. A development company plans to use the site as a container facility to support the new Texas City megaport facility that will add a number of direct and indirect jobs to the area. The Swan Lake Salt Marsh Areas continues to serve as wildlife habitat and as a migratory bird flyway.
Updated 11/2012

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United Creosoting Company

The 100-acre United Creosoting Company site is located in Conroe, Texas, about 40 miles north of Houston. From 1946 until 1972, the United Creosoting Company operated a wood preserving facility on approximately 100 acres of land in Conroe, Texas. Operators treated formed lumber, such as telephone poles and railroad ties, in a two-step process by the pressurized addition of creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP). In 1977, companies developed a portion of the property to include the Tanglewood East residential subdivision and several light industrial structures for Conroe Construction and Clarke Distributing companies. After the discovery of ground water and soil contamination with wood treatment chemicals, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Site remedies included capping concentrated areas of contamination, excavation of contaminated soils in close proximity to residences, and monitored natural attenuation of ground water contamination. The Conroe municipal water supply connects to all buildings on the site and no private wells are present. EPA and the State cleaned up soils to residential levels. Ground water monitoring is ongoing and the TCEQ is the lead for the O&M activities at the site. Residential and light industrial land uses continue at the site.
Updated 11/2012

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