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NPL Site Narrative for Haverhill Municipal Landfill

HAVERHILL MUNICIPAL LANDFILL
Haverhill, Massachusetts

Federal Register Notice:  June 10, 1986

Conditions at proposal (October 15, 1984): The Haverhill Municipal Landfill is located adjacent to the Merrimack River in the City of Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts. The landfill consists of three tracts of land covering a total of about 73 acres. Prior to June 1981, two of the three tracts were reportedly used for disposal of municipal and commercial refuse, while the other reportedly received liquid wastes and sludges. In August 1981, the city contracted for a ground water study, and evaluation of the landfill's impact on the local environment, and development of closure and monitoring plans. The results of that study indicate that ground water in the vicinity of the landfill is contaminated with volatile organic chemicals such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes.

Two municipal wells, which had supplied drinking water to approximately 6,000 people until they were closed in 1979 due to volatile organic contamination, lie within 1 mile of the site. These wells are being investigated as part of work at the Groveland Wells Site, which was placed on the NPL in September 1983.

Status (June 10, 1986): EPA is reviewing existing analytical and hydrogeologic information. The next step is a remedial investigation/feasibility study to determine the type and extent of contamination at the site and identify alternatives for remedial action.

For more information about the hazardous substances identified in this narrative summary, including general information regarding the effects of exposure to these substances on human health, please see the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) ToxFAQs. ATSDR ToxFAQs can be found on the Internet at ATSDR - ToxFAQs (http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/index.asp) or by telephone at 1-888-42-ATSDR or 1-888-422-8737.

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