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Susceptible and Vulnerable Populations - NO2 Monitoring

As part of the final rule revising the nitrogen dioxide (NO2) NAAQS in 2010 (75 FR 6474), EPA required the Regional Administrators to identify an additional 40 monitors that would be located in areas representing susceptible and vulnerable (S/V) populations.  As noted in the preamble, “EPA recognizes that susceptible and vulnerable populations, which include asthmatics and disproportionately exposed groups, are at particular risk of NO2-related health effects, both because of increased exposure and because these groups have a higher prevalence of asthma and higher hospitalization rates for asthma.  EPA is requiring the Regional Administrators, under their discretionary authority, to work with States to site an additional forty monitors across the nation to focus primarily on communities where susceptible and vulnerable populations are located. To address the risks of increased exposure to these populations, the Administrator has determined that it is appropriate and necessary, under this provision, to ensure these additional forty monitors are sited primarily in communities where susceptible and vulnerable populations are exposed to NO2 concentrations that have the potential to exceed the NAAQS (due to emissions from motor vehicles, point sources, or area sources).”

These monitors were required to be operational no later than January 1, 2013. Siting and detailed monitor information is required for inclusion in annual monitoring network plans that are submitted by the monitoring agencies to EPA by July 1st of each year.

During 2012, EPA worked to identify candidate NO2 sites that were being operated in addition to the already required area-wide and near-road monitors required by the 2010 NAAQS rule.  Although the pertinent monitoring regulations did not specify a preferred regional allocation of S/V sites, EPA worked on the premise that a broad regional distribution of sites would be a desirable attribute of the network of sites intended to characterize susceptible and vulnerable populations.

Additionally, the monitoring regulation did not specify a metric to be used to identify candidate locations. EPA therefore utilized available analytical capabilities and local knowledge to prioritize locations of interest.

A minimum of 40 NO2 sites have been identified to meet the specific rule requirement. EPA has worked with state and local monitoring agencies to ensure that identified sites are documented in annual monitoring network plans as meeting the requirement for characterizing susceptible and vulnerable populations and that such sites are listed as State and Local Air Monitoring sites (SLAMS) in the Air Quality System (AQS) database.

Since AQS does not have specific metadata field to denote those sites identified as meeting the above described requirement, EPA is providing a supplementary table to document that the specific requirement as described in 40 CFR Part 58, Appendix D, section 4.3.4(a) is being met.1


14.3.4   Regional Administrator Required Monitoring
(a) The Regional Administrators, in collaboration with States, must require a minimum of forty additional NO2 monitoring stations nationwide in any area, inside or outside of CBSAs, above the minimum monitoring requirements, with a primary focus on siting these monitors in locations to protect susceptible and vulnerable populations.

 

S/V NO2 monitors representing susceptible and vulnerable populations Listed by EPA Region and AQS ID
Click the hyperlink to obtain a Google Maps view of the area surrounding each site

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 4

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 8

Region 9

Region 10

Criscuolo Park
New Haven, CT
09-009-0027

Spruce St.
Camden, NJ
34-007-0002

River Terrace
Washington, DC
11-001-0041

Lexington Primary
Lexington, KY
21-067-0012

Gary-IITRI
Gary, IN
18-089-0022

Ascarate Park SE
El Paso, TX
48-141-0055

MARGARETTA
St. Louis, MO
29-510-0086

Ogden
Ogden, UT
49-057-0002

San Diego-downtown
San Diego, CA
06-073-1010

No Sites

Dudley Square
Roxbury
Boston, MA
25-025-0042

Elizabeth Lab
Elizabeth, NJ
34-039-0004

Front St Norris St.
Chester, PA
42-045-0002

Rosentiel School
Miami-Dade
12-086-0027

IEPA-RAPS
East St. Louis, IL
17-163-0010

Clinton
Houston, TX
48-201-1035

JFK
Kansas City, KS
20-209-0021

Welby
Welby, CO
08-001-3001

Sunrise Acres
Las Vegas, NV
32-003-0561

 

Kenmore Square
Boston, MA
25-025-0002

Newark Firehouse
Newark, NJ
34-013-0003

10TH & MARNE STREETS
Erie, PA
42-049-0003

Pascagoula
Pascagoula MS
28-059-0006

Com Ed Maintenance Bldg
Chicago, IL
17-031-0076

Arlington Municipal Airport
Arlington, TX
48-439-3011

 

 

Oakland West
Oakland, CA
06-001-0011

 

Liberty Street Parking Lot
Springfield, MA
25-013-0016

 

Math Science Innovation Center
Richmond, VA
51-087-0014

Hattie Avenue
Winston-Salem, NC
37-067-0022

 

Nederland High School
Nederland, TX
48-245-1035

 

 

Tentative
KEARNEY AG RESEARCH FARM
Parlier, CA
06-019-4001

 

 

 

 

Greenville ESC
Greenville, SC
45-045-0015

 

OKC CENTRAL-OSDH
Oklahoma City, OK
40-109-0033

 

 

Tentative
Bakersfield-MUNI

 

 

 

 

 

 

NORTH TULSA - FIRE STATION#24
Tulsa, OK
40-143-1127

 

 

Long Beach North
Long Beach, CA
06-037-4002

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parr
N. Little Rock, AR
05-119-0007

 

 

Los Angeles Downtown
Los Angeles, CA
06-037-1103

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital
Baton Rouge, LA
22-033-0009

 

 

24302 4TH ST
San Bernardino, CA
06-071-9004

 

 

 

 

 

 

Westlake
Westlake, LA
22-019-0008

 

 

Greenwood Phoenix, AZ
04-013-3010

 

 

 

 

 

 

207 Cherokee Boulevard
Roland, OK
40-135-9021

 

 

 

 

Table Revised July 12, 2013

 


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