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About This Database (Integrated Report)

This website provides information on water quality conditions reported by the states to EPA under Sections 305(b) and 303(d) of the Clean Water Act. EPA has issued guidance to the states recommending the submittal of 305(b) and 303(d) information in one Integrated Report, and has developed this website to display and support this reporting. Not all states have provided integrated data to EPA. Click on Status of Available Data to see whether or not Integrated Reports are available for individual states.

To guide users in using this website, we have developed two "About this Database" documents. This document, About this Database (Integrated Report), applies to those States whose reports are integrated. For States that have not submitted an Integrated Report, please refer to the document About this Database (Separate Impaired and Assessed Waters Reports).

This fact sheet describes the content (tables, charts, and other features) of the ATTAINS website. The items are described in the order they appear in the website.

Status of Available Data: Clickable chart that identifies available data, either integrated or separate, for each State and Territory.

National Summary of Most Current Available Data: Links to a National Summary of Assessed Waters Report using the most current available data for each state.

Map of United States: Clickable map that links to the selected states most recent Water Quality Assessment Report, for an integrated state, or the option to either select the state's Assessed Waters Report or Impaired Waters Report, for a non-integrated state.

Refine your Search: Define your own search by selecting a reporting year and state or region. To limit the results to assessment or TMDL information, select one of the buttons next to all information, threatened and impaired waters and TMDL information, or TMDL information only.

Search for a Waterbody: Enter all or part of a waterbody name (e.g. Black Creek) and select a state to retrieve available data for that waterbody (such as its location, size, and whether it is impaired).

Region Websites: Under Refine your Search on the ATTAINS home page, select Region. This selection will take you to a map of the EPA regions. This map is clickable, and will link to the selected regions Water Quality Assessment Report.

Water Quality Assessment Report

Water Quality Assessment Data for the State: Clickable list of all the tables and charts in the website for the state.

Total Assessed Waters for State: The extent to which the state's assessed waters support their uses, for each type of water (e.g., river and stream miles; lakes, reservoirs, and ponds acres), and the amount assessed by the state for the most recent reporting cycle (e.g., 2006, 2008). Assessed waters are those for which monitoring or other types of information have been used by the state to judge whether designated uses are being met. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. Information is also provided on restored waters and threatened and impaired waters TMDL development status.

Assessed Waters, Overall Water Quality Attainment for Rivers and Streams: The extent to which the state's assessed river and stream miles support their uses. A river and stream mile may be assessed for several different uses. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. River and stream miles assessed as threatened or impaired are also grouped by TMDL development status, which includes: TMDL completed, TMDL alternative, Non-pollutant, or TMDL needed.

Assessed Waters, Designated Use Support for Rivers and Streams: Information on the extent to which the state's assessed river and stream miles support individual designated uses (such as aquatic life harvesting). The table summarizes the total number of stream miles that were assessed for each use as well as the result of that assessment: "good" (the designated use is met), "threatened" (the designated use is currently met but water quality conditions appear to be declining), and "impaired" (the designated use is not met). States use many different designated use definitions. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the use in the left-hand column to see which state use categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database.

Causes of Impairments for Rivers and Streams: The pollutants or stressors (such as sediment) that are causing impairment in assessed river and stream miles in the state. The table also includes the number of stream miles impaired by each cause. While most of the cause names (such as siltation or pH) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Probable Sources of Impairments for Rivers and Streams: The leading sources (i.e., activities, facilities or conditions) that generate pollution and contribute to impairment in assessed river and stream miles in the state. The table also includes the number of stream miles impaired by each source. While most of the source names (such as agriculture and municipal point source discharges) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Assessed Waters, Overall Water Quality Attainment for Lakes, Reservoirs, and Ponds: The extent to which the state's assessed lake, reservoir, and pond acres support their uses. A lake, reservoir, and pond acre may be assessed for several different uses. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. Lake, reservoir, and pond acres assessed as threatened or impaired are also grouped by TMDL development status, which includes: TMDL completed, TMDL alternative, Non-pollutant, or TMDL needed.

Assessed Waters, Designated Use Support for Lakes, Reservoirs, and Ponds: Information on the extent to which the state's assessed lake, reservoir, and pond acres support individual designated uses (such as aquatic life harvesting). The table summarizes the total number of lake, reservoir, and pond acres that were assessed for each use as well as the result of that assessment: "good" (the designated use is met), "threatened" (the designated use is currently met but water quality conditions appear to be declining), and "impaired" (the designated use is not met). States use many different designated use definitions. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the use in the left-hand column to see which state use categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database.

Causes of Impairments for Lakes, Reservoirs, and Ponds: The pollutants or stressors (such as sediment) that are causing impairment in assessed lake, reservoir, and pond acres in the state. The table also includes the number of lake, reservoir, and pond acres impaired by each cause. While most of the cause names (such as siltation or pH) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Probable Sources of Impairments for Lakes, Reservoirs, and Ponds: The leading sources (i.e., activities, facilities or conditions) that generate pollution and contribute to impairment in assessed lake, reservoir, and pond acres in the state. The table also includes the number of lake, reservoir, and pond acres impaired by each source. While most of the source names (such as agriculture and municipal point source discharges) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Assessed Waters, Overall Water Quality Attainment for Bays and Estuaries: The extent to which the state's assessed bay and estuary square miles support their uses. A bay and estuary may be assessed for several different uses. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. Bay and estuary square miles assessed as threatened or impaired are also grouped by TMDL development status, which includes: TMDL completed, TMDL alternative, Non-pollutant, or TMDL needed.

Assessed Waters, Designated Use Support for Bays and Estuaries: Information on the extent to which the state's assessed bay and estuary square miles support individual designated uses (such as aquatic life harvesting). The table summarizes the total number of bay and estuary square miles that were assessed for each use as well as the result of that assessment: "good" (the designated use is met), "threatened" (the designated use is currently met but water quality conditions appear to be declining), and "impaired" (the designated use is not met). States use many different designated use definitions. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the use in the left-hand column to see which state use categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database.

Causes of Impairments for Bays and Estuaries: The pollutants or stressors (such as sediment) that are causing impairment in assessed bay and estuary square miles in the state. The table also includes the number of bay and estuary square miles impaired by each cause. While most of the cause names (such as siltation or pH) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Probable Sources of Impairments for Bays and Estuaries: The leading sources (i.e., activities, facilities or conditions) that generate pollution and contribute to impairment in assessed bay and estuary square miles in the state. The table also includes the number of bay and estuary square miles impaired by each source. While most of the source names (such as agriculture and municipal point source discharges) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Assessed Waters, Overall Water Quality Attainment for Coastal Shorelines: The extent to which the state's assessed coastal shoreline square miles support their uses. A coastal shoreline may be assessed for several different uses. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. Coastal shoreline square miles assessed as threatened or impaired are also grouped by TMDL development status, which includes: TMDL completed, TMDL alternative, Non-pollutant, or TMDL needed.

Assessed Waters, Designated Use Support for Coastal Shorelines: Information on the extent to which the state's assessed coastal shoreline square miles support individual designated uses (such as aquatic life harvesting). The table summarizes the total number of coastal shoreline square miles that were assessed for each use as well as the result of that assessment: "good" (the designated use is met), "threatened" (the designated use is currently met but water quality conditions appear to be declining), and "impaired" (the designated use is not met). States use many different designated use definitions. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the use in the left-hand column to see which state use categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database.

Causes of Impairments for Coastal Shorelines: The pollutants or stressors (such as sediment) that are causing impairment in assessed coastal shoreline square miles in the state. The table also includes the number of coastal shoreline square miles impaired by each cause. While most of the cause names (such as siltation or pH) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Probable Sources of Impairments for Coastal Shorelines: The leading sources (i.e., activities, facilities or conditions) that generate pollution and contribute to impairment in assessed coastal shoreline square miles in the state. The table also includes the number of coastal shoreline square miles impaired by each source. While most of the source names (such as agriculture and municipal point source discharges) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Assessed Waters, Overall Water Quality Attainment for Ocean and Near Coastal: The extent to which the state's assessed ocean and near coastal square miles support their uses. An ocean and near coastal water may be assessed for several different uses. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. Ocean and near coastal square miles assessed as threatened or impaired are also grouped by TMDL development status, which includes: TMDL completed, TMDL alternative, Non-pollutant, or TMDL needed.

Assessed Waters, Designated Use Support for Ocean and Near Coastal: Information on the extent to which the state's assessed ocean and near coastal square miles support individual designated uses (such as aquatic life harvesting). The table summarizes the total number of ocean and near coastal square miles that were assessed for each use as well as the result of that assessment: "good" (the designated use is met), "threatened" (the designated use is currently met but water quality conditions appear to be declining), and "impaired" (the designated use is not met). States use many different designated use definitions. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the use in the left-hand column to see which state use categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database.

Causes of Impairments for Ocean and Near Coastal: The pollutants or stressors (such as sediment) that are causing impairment in assessed ocean and near coastal square miles in the state. The table also includes the number of ocean and near coastal square miles impaired by each cause. While most of the cause names (such as siltation or pH) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Probable Sources of Impairments for Ocean and Near Coastal: The leading sources (i.e., activities, facilities or conditions) that generate pollution and contribute to impairment in assessed ocean and near coastal square miles in the state. The table also includes the number of ocean and near coastal square miles impaired by each source. While most of the source names (such as agriculture and municipal point source discharges) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Assessed Waters, Overall Water Quality Attainment for Wetlands: The extent to which the state's assessed wetland acres support their uses. A wetland may be assessed for several different uses. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. Wetland acres assessed as threatened or impaired are also grouped by TMDL development status, which includes: TMDL completed, TMDL alternative, Non-pollutant, or TMDL needed.

Assessed Waters, Designated Use Support for Wetlands: Information on the extent to which the state's assessed wetland acres support individual designated uses (such as aquatic life harvesting). The table summarizes the total number of wetland acres that were assessed for each use as well as the result of that assessment: "good" (the designated use is met), "threatened" (the designated use is currently met but water quality conditions appear to be declining), and "impaired" (the designated use is not met). States use many different designated use definitions. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the use in the left-hand column to see which state use categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database.

Causes of Impairments for Wetlands: The pollutants or stressors (such as sediment) that are causing impairment in assessed wetland acres in the state. The table also includes the number of wetland acres impaired by each cause. While most of the cause names (such as siltation or pH) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Probable Sources of Impairments for Wetlands: The leading sources (i.e., activities, facilities or conditions) that generate pollution and contribute to impairment in assessed wetland acres in the state. The table also includes the number of wetland acres impaired by each source. While most of the source names (such as agriculture and municipal point source discharges) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Assessed Waters, Overall Water Quality Attainment for Great Lakes Shoreline: The extent to which the state's assessed Great Lakes shoreline miles support their uses. A Great Lakes shoreline may be assessed for several different uses. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. Great Lakes shoreline miles assessed as threatened or impaired are also grouped by TMDL development status, which includes: TMDL completed, TMDL alternative, Non-pollutant, or TMDL needed.

Assessed Waters, Designated Use Support for Great Lakes Shoreline: Information on the extent to which the state's assessed Great Lakes shoreline miles support individual designated uses (such as aquatic life harvesting). The table summarizes the total number of Great Lakes shoreline miles that were assessed for each use as well as the result of that assessment: "good" (the designated use is met), "threatened" (the designated use is currently met but water quality conditions appear to be declining), and "impaired" (the designated use is not met). States use many different designated use definitions. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the use in the left-hand column to see which state use categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database.

Causes of Impairments for Great Lakes Shoreline: The pollutants or stressors (such as sediment) that are causing impairment in assessed Great Lakes shoreline miles in the state. The table also includes the number of Great Lakes shoreline miles impaired by each cause. While most of the cause names (such as siltation or pH) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Probable Sources of Impairments for Great Lakes Shoreline: The leading sources (i.e., activities, facilities or conditions) that generate pollution and contribute to impairment in assessed Great Lakes shoreline miles in the state. The table also includes the number of Great lakes shoreline miles impaired by each source. While most of the source names (such as agriculture and municipal point source discharges) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Assessed Waters, Overall Water Quality Attainment for Great Lakes Open Water: The extent to which the state's assessed Great Lakes open water square miles support their uses. A Great Lakes open water may be assessed for several different uses. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. Great Lakes open water square miles assessed as threatened or impaired are also grouped by TMDL development status, which includes: TMDL completed, TMDL alternative, Non-pollutant, or TMDL needed.

Assessed Waters, Designated Use Support for Great Lakes Open Water: Information on the extent to which the state's assessed Great Lakes open water miles support individual designated uses (such as aquatic life harvesting). The table summarizes the total number of Great Lakes open water square miles that were assessed for each use as well as the result of that assessment: "good" (the designated use is met), "threatened" (the designated use is currently met but water quality conditions appear to be declining), and "impaired" (the designated use is not met). States use many different designated use definitions. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the use in the left-hand column to see which state use categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database.

Causes of Impairments for Great Lakes Open Water: The pollutants or stressors (such as sediment) that are causing impairment in assessed Great Lakes open water square miles in the state. The table also includes the number of Great Lakes open water square miles impaired by each cause. While most of the cause names (such as siltation or pH) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Probable Sources of Impairments for Great Lakes Open Water: The leading sources (i.e., activities, facilities or conditions) that generate pollution and contribute to impairment in assessed Great Lakes open water square miles in the state. The table also includes the number of Great Lakes open water square miles impaired by each source. While most of the source names (such as agriculture and municipal point source discharges) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. When you are in the national summary page, you can click on the cause of impairment in the left-hand column to see which state impairment categories were grouped together for reporting purposes in this national database. See the state Integrated Report for more information.

Causes of Impairment: List all pollutants or stressors that are causing impairment in assessed waters of the state and the number of miles, acres, or square miles that are impaired by each cause in each waterbody type. While most of the cause names (such as nutrients or metals) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. Click on the underlined cause of impairment group to see a list of specific state causes of impairment that make up the selected group.

Probable Sources Contributing to Impairment: List all sources that generate pollution and contribute to impairment in all assessed waters of the state and the number of miles, acres, or square miles that are impaired by each source in each waterbody type. While most of the source names (such as agriculture and municipal point source discharges) are standard and widely used by all states, others may be unique to a given state. Click on the underlined probable source to see a list of specific state probable sources that make up the selected group.

TMDL Alternatives by Cause of Impairment: List of TMDL Alternatives by impairment group. Click on the underlined parent impairment group to obtain a detailed list of cause of impairments. Click on the underlined number to obtain a list of waterbodies address covered by the TMDL Alternative plus information such as state, waterbody name, waterbody ID, cycle first listed, and expected to attain date. This table is only available in state reports. For additional information on TMDL Alternatives, see the 2008 Integrated Report Memo available at http://www.epa.gov/owow/tmdl/2008_ir_memorandum.html

Cumulative Number of TMDLs by Fiscal Year: Clickable list of TMDLs approved by fiscal year (October 1 to September 30) since October 1995. Select the underlined number to obtain a list of TMDLs approved for the selected fiscal year.

Cumulative Number of TMDLs by Pollutant: Clickable list of TMDLs developed by pollutant. Click on the pollutant to obtain a list of waters for which a TMDL was developed or click on the underlined number to obtain a list of TMDLs.

Cumulative Number of TMDLs for Tribal Waters by Fiscal Year: Clickable list of TMDLs approved by fiscal year (October 1 to September 30) since October 1995. Select the underlined number to obtain a list of TMDLs approved for the selected fiscal year. This table is only available in state reports where tribal water TMDLs have been developed.

Status of Available Data Used in Report: A table that shows the assessed waters and impaired waters data report year used for the national report.

Waterbody Changes from Prior Cycle: Tables that show waterbody changes, which include delisted waterbodies or water quality standards (WQS) attainment waterbodies, from the previous reporting cycle (e.g., 2002 to 2004, 2004 to 2006). Reasons for delisting waters include: TMDL approved or established by EPA (Category 4a), other pollution control requirements (Category 4b), Not caused by a pollutant (Category 4c), or data and/or information lacking to determine water quality status; original basis for listing was incorrect (Category 3). Reasons for WQS attainment include: applicable WQS attained, original basis for listing was incorrect; applicable WQS attained due to restoration activities; applicable WQS attained due to change in WQS; applicable WQS attained according to new assessment method; applicable WQS attained threatened water no longer threatened; or applicable WQS attained, reason for recovery unspecified.

Waterbody History Report: The 305(b) and 303(d) Waterbody History Reports provide reporting cycle and cause of impairment tracking information for individual waterbodies. Reporting cycle tracking refers to the waterbody ID changes, including those that pertain to resegmentation, that a waterbody has undergone throughout its history. Cause of impairment tracking refers to the cause of impairment terminology changes a cause of impairment may have undergone from one reporting cycle to the next reporting cycle (e.g., a cause of impairment identified as "pathogens" in the 2010 reporting cycle may be changed to "fecal coliform" in the 2012 reporting cycle). Where available, cause of impairment tracking also includes information about TMDL development status and attainment of water quality standards. Reporting cycle and cause of impairment tracking are stored separately for 305(b) assessment and 303(d) listed water decision data, and therefore they appear in separate reports, even when the waterbody being viewed is in a state report where the state submits integrated data. EPA started to collect 303(d) reporting cycle and cause of impairment tracking data in the 2008 reporting cycle; although some data from earlier reporting cycles exists, the information may not be complete. EPA started to collect 305(b) reporting cycle and cause of impairment tracking data in the 2010 reporting cycle. Reporting cycle and cause of impairment tracking data are optional and may not exist for all states or waterbodies.

Other Reporting Year Data: Report cycle years for which data is available. Click on the year to view the data.

Comparison Summary by Reporting Year: Tables organized by waterbody type that show the extent to which the state's assessed waters support their uses, and the amount assessed by the state for each reporting cycle (e.g., 2002, 2004, 2006). Assessed waters are those for which monitoring or other types of information have been used by the state to judge whether designated uses are being met. In order to be considered "good," it must meet all the uses for which it was assessed. It is considered "threatened" if it is meeting all assessed uses but if water quality conditions appear to be declining. It is considered "impaired" if any one of its assessed uses is not met. The second table for each waterbody type provides the TMDL development (TMDL completed, TMDL alternative, Non-pollutant, or TMDL needed) status for threatened and impaired waters.

State Websites: Links to each state's water quality assessment report website and its general water quality program. You can visit the state websites for more information on water quality conditions and pollution control programs.

Search for a Waterbody: Enter the name of a specific waterbody in a state (e.g. Black Creek) to retrieve available data for that waterbody (such as location, size, and whether it is impaired).

Download Excel Compatible Information: Link to Waters Expert Query Tool. For information on how to use this tool, refer to the Expert Query User Manual available on the Waters Expert Query website.

Download GIS Information (Internet Explorer Only): Link to the Reach Assessment Database (RAD) Download. To download Water Program data from the RAD, specify your Area of Interest and desired Water Program Features in the form available at this link, then click on the Submit button

Search by Watershed: Select the watershed of interest from the drop down menu and click on go, which will take you to a watershed summary page for the selected watershed. By clicking on the watershed map on the summary page, you will be taken to the Enviromapper for Water website, where you can view and map various types of environmental information for the state. This information includes Superfund sites, water discharge permits, toxic releases, and more. On the watershed summary page, you can also search by waterbody name, enter this information in the search box underneath the map.

Map of State: Clicking on any of the 8-digit HUC watersheds in the map will take you to a watershed summary page for the selected watershed; to identify the correct HUC, place your cursor over the HUC and a box will appear with the HUC number and name. By clicking on the watershed map on the summary page, you will be taken to the Enviromapper for Water website, where you can view and map various types of environmental information for the state. This information includes Superfund sites, water discharge permits, toxic releases, and more.

Search for a Waterbody: Enter the waterbody name of interest. All waterbodies with the name that matches the search criteria will be pulled and presented in a clickable table. Click on the underlined waterbody name to view the waterbody report. Information presented in the table also includes: waterbody name, waterbody ID, most current data available, location, map, waterbody type, size, unit, status, and TMDL development status. You can also limit the search to only threatened and impaired water data by checking the box located under ‘Enter Waterbody Name'.

Summary of 303(d) Listed Waters: Provides a clickable table of the state's 303(d) listed waters. In the table, click on the underlined waterbody name to see a waterbody report, or click on the underlined TMDL Date to see a detailed TMDL report.


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