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Landers, D.H., P.K. Haggerty, S. Cline, W. Carson, and F. Faure. 2000. The role of regionalization in large river restoration. Verh. Int. Verein. Limnol. 27:344-351.

Corvallis Western Ecology Division Scientists quantitatively determined the effect of the 1996 flood on the physical features in two (~12 km) reaches of the active channel of the Willamette River. The objective of this study was to evaluate a quantative approach using historical channel information that could be applied in developing a regional strategy for evaluating the restoration potential of specific reaches of a large river. Aerial photographs and digital ortho quads were used to evaluate the change and to determine the measurement error in the methods used. Results from this work suggest that these methods produce information with small ( 5m in plan and 1 m in elevation) measurement errors and that channel changes resulting from a flood with an estimated 20 year recurrence interval can be important with regard to maintaining off-channel habitat complexity and habitat diversity. It appears that these methods could be applied to evaluate the entire active channel of the river in order to target appropriate restoration measures based on potential for landform changes.

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