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Young, D.R., D.T. Specht, B.D. Robbins and P.J. Clinton. 1999. Delineation of Pacific Northwest SAVs from aerial photography: Natural color or color infrared film? Pages 1173-1178 in Proceedings of the 1999 ASPRS Annual Conference, American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Bethesda, MD.

The goal of creating a synoptic, digital data base for coastal wetlands, including submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), has led Federal agencies to develop standards and protocols for data acquisition. Specifically, NOAA's Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) recommends the use of either natural color or black-and-white negative film when photographing SAV from an aerial platform. This recommendation was based on experiments conducted in North Carolina where SAV, specifically seagrasses, are subtidal. However, in the Pacific Northwest SAV often also occurs intertidally, exposed by low tides. Because color infrared film allows a finer delineation of terrestrial vegetation than natural color, we hypothesized the same for exposed SAV Thus, during the summer of 1997 we photographed Yaquina Bay, Oregon (scale 1:7200) at low tide using both infrared and natural color film. We delineated Yaquina Bay's intertidal SAV from georeferenced digital orthorectified images obtained using both natural color and color infrared film. Although accuracies of the SAV classifications for the two film types were similar, color infrared film was found to be more useful for delineating exposed SAV distributions in this ecosystem.

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