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On-farm Digester Projects

The projects listed below are currently operating co-digestion systems at livestock farms.  The profiles represent real-world examples of projects that demonstrate the benefits of using anaerobic digestion systems for manure management.  In addition, accepting organic feedstocks from offsite sources can generate revenue from tipping fees and boost biogas production which can be used as energy for the farm or sold.

EPA's AgSTAR program promotes the use of anaerobic digestion on farms in the United States.  According to AgSTAR there are 242 farms with active digesters. 

Learn more about farm digester projects

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  • Big Sky West Dairy Project (PDF)(1 pg, 353 K, July 2016)
    This anaerobic digester project is located on a dairy farm in Gooding, Idaho. It is the first third-party owned and operated dairy digester in the country. The digester produces an average of 1,008 kilowatts per hour of electricity, improves the farm’s management of manure and nutrients, and generates revenue for the owner through the sale of electricity, carbon credits and renewable energy certificates.
  • Danny Kluthe Swine Farm Project (PDF)(1 pg, 443 K, July 2016)
    This anaerobic digester project is located on a swine farm in Dodge, Nebraska. This project includes the first on-farm generator powered by manure methane in the state. The farm produces 730,000 kilowatts-hours of energy per year which is enough to power 53 homes and it produces compressed natural gas (CNG) to fuel trucks and farm tractors which saves the farm money in fuel costs.
  • Fair Oaks Dairy Project (PDF)(1 pg, 271 K, July 2016)
    This digester project is located on a dairy farm in Fair Oaks, Indiana. This project benefits the farm in many ways. The biogas produced in the digester is processed into compressed natural gas (CNG) for transportation fuel and sale. The electricity generated is used on the farm and allows the farm to purchase less electricity. Additionally, waste heat from the engine is recovered and used to heat the digester which allows the farm to avoid purchase of heating fuel for the digester.