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Profiles of Members of the Native-American Community at EPA: Jared Hautamaki

Profiles of Members of the Native-American Community at EPA


Jared Hautamaki

Jared Hautamaki, Attorney Advisor
Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance
Washington, DC

Where were you born?

I was born in Green Bay, Wisconsin.  

What is your tribal affiliation?

I'm a member of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians from Michigan's Upper Peninsula. In May 2016, I was appointed to serve as a Reserve Appellate Judge for my tribe.

What brought you to EPA?

I came to EPA after doing contract work at the Native American Rights Fund.  Being aware of the environmental issues that tribes face and the importance we put on preserving the land for future generations, I thought it would be an excellent opportunity to help my people as well as my country.

What kind of work do you do at EPA?

I work as an attorney advisor in the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. I am also currently serving as an observer on the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel for the Mars 2020 mission.

I recently completed a detail as a Special Assistant in the Office of the Administrator where I served as a liaison to the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, the Office of General Counsel and the Office of Policy.

Did you go to vocational school or college? What was your major?

For my undergraduate degree, I attended Saginaw Valley State University, where I majored in theatre performance. After five years of working for a Congressman John Conyers, Jr., I decided to go back to school. I attended the Pre-Law Summer Institute for Native Americans and Alaskan Natives at the University of New Mexico, where I was recruited to attend the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law. In 2014, I graduated from the International Aviation and Outer Space Law Masters of Laws program at McGill University in Montreal.

What message would you like to send young Native Americans who are considering going to college?

You need to learn not only the ways of your tribe, but the basics of math, science, history, and government.  Only then will you begin to protect the sovereignty guaranteed to us by our treaty rights, along with the earth, water, land and animals that we all rely on.

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