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Climate Action Benefits Report

Text Version of Climate Action Benefits: Regional Highlights Map

The map shows 18 regional highlights from EPA's CIRA analysis:

  • Shellfish: Acidification in the Pacific Northwest is already affecting U.S. shellfish harvests. The U.S. supplies of oysters, clams, and scallops are projected to decline 45%, 32%, and 48%, respectively, in the Reference scenario in 2100, compared to 11%, 3%, and 11%, respectively, in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Carbon Storage: The Northwest is projected to experience a 6.1% decrease in terrestrial carbon storage in 2100 under the Reference scenario, compared to a 2.4% decrease in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Water Supply and Demand: California is projected to incur $4.5 billion in damages in 2100 due to changes in water supply and demand in the Reference scenario. However, climate change under the Mitigation scenario is projected to result in an increase in welfare of $40 million.
  • Labor: In 2100, the Southwest is projected to experience a 3.4% decrease in high-risk labor hours worked in the Reference scenario, compared to a decrease of 0.82% in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Drought: In the Southwest, the number of severe and extreme droughts is projected to nearly quadruple by the end of the century in the Reference scenario compared to today. In the Mitigation scenario, the incidence of drought is not projected to change substantially from present day.
  • Water Quality: The Southwest is projected to experience water quality damages of approximately $1.8 billion in 2100 under the Reference scenario, compared to $470 million in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Coral Reefs: By the end of the century, Hawaii is projected to lose 98% of its current shallow-water coral in the Reference scenario, compared to 64% in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Wildfire: In the Rocky Mountains, an estimated 1.9 million more acres are projected to burn in 2100 under the Reference scenario compared to today. In the Mitigation scenario, an estimated 1.5 million fewer acres are projected to burn compared to today.
  • Inland Flooding: In Texas, projected damages associated with the 100-year flood event are $3.6 billion in 2100 under the Reference scenario, compared to $2.6 billion in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Roads: In 2100, the Great Plains region is projected to incur road damages of approximately $3.5 billion in the Reference scenario, compared to $1.1 billion in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Bridges: In the Great Lakes region, approximately 520 bridges are projected to be vulnerable in 2100 under the Reference scenario, compared to 65 in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Freshwater Fish: Throughout the Appalachians, global GHG mitigation is projected to preserve approximately 70% of habitat for coldwater fish species (e.g., trout) that would otherwise be lost by the end of the century to rising temperatures from unmitigated climate change.
  • Extreme Temperature: Without mitigation, major cities in the Northeast from D.C. to Boston are projected to suffer a combined 2,600 extreme temperature mortalities in 2100, compared to 190 in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Urban Drainage: In 2100, major cities analyzed in the Great Plains are estimated to incur $2.1 million per square mile in damages associated with urban drainage systems in the Reference scenario, compared to $750,000 per square mile in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Air Quality: In 2100, areas of the Southeast are projected to experience an annual increase in ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) of 0.7 ppb and 1 μg/m-3, respectively. In the Mitigation scenario, the levels of O3 and PM2.5 are projected to decrease by 120% and 88%, respectively, compared to the Reference.
  • Coastal Property: In 2100, coastal property in the Tampa Bay area is projected to incur $2.8 billion in damages from sea level rise and storm surge in the Reference scenario without adaptation. When adaptation measures are implemented, total costs in 2100 fall to $500 million in the Reference scenario, compared to $450 million in the Mitigation scenario.
  • Electricity Demand: The South Central region is projected to experience a 2.0% to 4.2% increase in electricity demand under the Reference scenario in 2050. In the Mitigation scenario, the projected change in demand ranges from -1.4% to 1.6%.
  • Agriculture: In the Southeast, yields of irrigated soybeans are projected to decrease 23% in 2100 under the Reference scenario. Under the Mitigation scenario, yields are projected to increase 4.7%.