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EnviroAtlas

About the EnviroAtlas Team

EnviroAtlas is part of an ongoing commitment to sustainable and healthy communities and safe and sustainable water resources. EnviroAtlas is a collaborative project developed by researchers at EPA in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and Landscope America. The growing team of collaborators includes partner agencies,  contractors, academic institutions, and non-profits; this development team works together to make sure EnviroAtlas includes the best available data, research, and analysis. 

Project Partners

  • USDA United States Forest Service (USFS)

    The USFS  is best known for managing National Forest land, but they are also the largest forestry research organization in the world. EnviroAtlas includes many data layers that have been created with the peer-reviewed USFS i-Tree  software, which quantifies the stormwater, air quality, and many other benefits associated with urban trees. EPA researchers have expanded upon these products by translating urban forestry benefits into quantitative health and economic outcomes at the community-scale. EPA and USFS continue to explore collaborative efforts to enhance the EnviroAtlas.

  • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)

    The NRCS  works with private landowners to assist, educate, and encourage stewardship practices designed to benefit the soil, water, air, plants, animals that result in productive lands and healthy ecosystems. As a leading agency in soils research and development, NRCS products provided the foundation for soil data included in EnviroAtlas. This information can help guide land management practices and educate communities about the importance of soil health to the future integrity and function of valuable ecosystem services.

  • United States Geological Survey (USGS)

    The USGS Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries  provides impartial scientific information on the health of our ecosystems and environment. They lead the National Gap Analysis Program (GAP)  which analyzes the distribution and conservation of common plants and animals. Most of the EnviroAtlas national-scale data layers on biodiversity and species richness are based on GAP models. EPA and USGS continue to explore collaborative efforts to enhance the EnviroAtlas.

  • LandScope America

    The National Geographic Society Exit, in collaboration with NatureServe Exit, has developed LandScope America Exit. This unique web-based tool combines photos, data, and research to support individuals and organizations trying to conserve critical land throughout the country. EnviroAtlas is working with LandScope to develop data and share maps.

  • Forest Trends

    Forest Trends Exitworks to conserve forests and other ecosystems through the creation and wide adoption of a broad range of environmental finance, markets and other payment and incentive mechanisms. Their Ecosystem Marketplace Exit is the leading global source of information on environmental finance, markets, and payments for ecosystem services. EnviroAtlas was able to incorporate data on ecosystem markets and market enabling conditions though a collaborative effort with USDA's Office of Environmental Markets and Forest Trends' Ecosystem Marketplace.

  • USDA Office of Environmental Markets

    The Office of Environmental Markets  coordinates environmental market activities across the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and helps to develop the tools, resources, and information necessary for farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners to participate in environmental markets. EnviroAtlas was able to incorporate data on ecosystem markets and market enabling conditions though a collaborative effort with USDA's Office of Environmental Markets and Forest Trends' Ecosystem Marketplace.