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Environmental Justice

Environmental Justice Grants

Grantees by State, 2000 - Present

Alabama

Mobile Baykeeper, Inc.
Year: 2012

Water Quality
Mobile Baykeeper will train residents in communities surrounding Threemile Creek to conduct long-term monitoring of local waterways. Through data collection and analysis, the community will develop strategies to reduce impacts from stormwater runoff. The project will meet its goal by establishing a comprehensive outreach and education campaign, community cleanup efforts and a coalition of residents dedicated to sustaining clean waterways.

 

Mobile Bay Keeper Inc.
Year: 2011

Water Quality
Mobile Bay Keeper, Inc. will empower citizens along the Alabama coast to address environmental and public health issues. This project addresses environmental and public health threats related to storm water runoff and oil pollution in coastal Alabama. The project will train property owners, business owners, and others who live and work along Alabama’s 670 miles of tidally influenced shoreline to identify and report impacts from the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and other coastal threats become engaged in the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process and understand the importance of coastal restoration. The project will also encourage residents to become involved with costal restoration projects in the state. These efforts will inform and engage citizens who live and work in close proximity to sensitive waterways and provide additional data for NRDA trustees.

 

The Door II Community Center
Year: 2003

Air Quality, Water Quality
This project proposes to implement a youth driven environmental awareness program that will compel residents to examine local environmental issues. The current issues of great concern are the air and water quality in Lowndes County. The program will disseminate information on pollution, and the adverse effects of poor water quality. The youth will work to gain countywide participation from government entities, local nonprofits, businesses, churches, and the media in support of a pollutant-free community. This collaborative effort will deliver services to African American youths, ages 10 through 19.

 

University of Montevallo Biology/Chemistry/Math Department
Year: 2002

Toxic Substances
Assessment of Lead Contamination Levels Project: This project will determine the correlation between high incidences of lead poisoning reported cases and high lead levels in neighborhoods outdoor soils, in the dwellings of these subjects. The project will: (1) Investigate the levels of lead contamination in the outdoor soils of the dwellings of the patients inflicted with lead poisoning. (2) Collect soil samples from the front and back yards of 40 dwellings of the reported cases in the designated zip code areas. (3) Collect for analysis a total of 240 soil samples.

 

Poarch Band of Creek Indians
Year: 2002

Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal
Poarch Creek Environmental Project: This project will develop and implement two units of the Environmental Justice (EJ) Training Courses which are specific to the unique needs of the Poarch Creek Tribal Community. These units will be designed to enhance critical thinking skills in the identification of water and solid waste pollution issues. The training will also involve exercises in problem-solving of environmental problems through community-based planning and intervention efforts.

 

Village Creek Human & Environmental Justice Society
Year: 2001

Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal
This Village Creek Environmental Justice Project will address the polluted water and the solid waste products which overflow into the neighborhoods in Village Creek. The project will: (1) present two initial awareness workshops for the community; (2) conduct bimonthly forums with community, government, business, industry for the betterment of the Village Creek watershed; (3) develop video presentation and brochure concerning issues in the Village Creek watershed; and (4) complete a Village Creek education map.

 

Community Against Pollution
Year: 2001

Toxic Substances
This project will address protecting children’s health and reducing lead exposure and poisoning from uncontrolled lead releases such as lead-based paint and surface soil. The project proposes to: (1) Utilize soil samples and blood level testing collected by government agencies; (2) Analyze and interpret data and present the results to the community; (3) Establish and maintain an accurate and reliable database of resources for community uses; and (4) Form a working network of community organizations, local, state, and federal governments, and other agencies regarding lead poisoning and exposure prevention.

 

Project Awake
Year: 2000

Water Quality, Toxic Substances
Despite significant improvements in the Sumter County Alabama’s Water System, several communities are still drinking contaminated water from the water system, springs, and wells. The What’s Flowing Through Our Faucet project seeks to provide up-to-date scientific information and research on the effects of dioxin on human health. The project mission is to: 1) Research information on pollution and human health effects from chemical toxins/dioxin exposure; 2) Identify environmental justice problems and involve the community via the health survey campaign; and 3) Share research results with the community.

 

Community Against Pollution
Year: 2000
Air Quality, Water Quality, Toxic Substances

The Environmental Justice Project will research the level of PCB exposure by air, water, and soil contamination of citizens that are directly impacted in Anniston, Alabama. The project will also allow low-income and minority residents to actively participate in assessing the level of PCB exposure and development of remediation plans for identified sources of contamination. Finally, the project will also provide PCB risk and health effects results to the community and assist in data collection and analysis of information.

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Alaska

Zender Environmental Health and Research Group
Year: 2018
Solid Waste Disposal and Backhaul Program Development

This project will serve to address waste issues at 160 rural Alaska Native predominant tribal communities (“villages”) located off the road system, accessible by summer barge/boat or small plane.  Remote Alaska communities under about 1,000 people each are under a singular RCRA classification that allows unlined landfills and contained open waste burning, and there is a resultant disproportionate health burden. Alarmingly, birth defects are 4.3 times more likely to occur for babies born to mothers in villages with such landfills, associated specifically with high hazard contents.  To avoid this risk, the main answer for villages is to backhaul hazardous wastes out to proper facilities.  For that option to be viable, the newly planned Backhaul Alaska Program is launching its pilot.  This project will support the participation of 30 pilot villages in designing the final program.  The project also builds community capacity and leadership for villages to carry out the program’s local waste handling tasks safely, and to interact with industries and agencies in a way that brings them to the table.  To get Backhaul Alaska to this point has required collaboration among many varied stakeholder groups and partners, and to sustainably fund it, this proposal also supports further development of partnerships and expanded stakeholder outreach to realize a number of promising leveraging efforts.

Three Degrees
Year: 2017
Water Quality

Kivalina, an Alaska Native village of approximately 475 residents, lacks adequate water and sanitation infrastructure placing increased risks on both the local environment and public health. In 2015, the Kivalina City and Tribal Councils worked with community partners to co-develop a prototype large-scale biochar reactor, a relocatable device that converts human waste into pathogen-free biochar. Biochar has proven to be useful as a soil amendment, for odor elimination, and to mitigate pollution at toxic waste sites. The project proposes to initiate operation of the reactor by hiring local workers from the community that will operate and manage the reactor, track system performance, and lead community educational programming about the reactor and its benefits to the community. Community outreach activities include community workshops, household surveys, radio announcements, and long-term planning town halls.

Sitka Tribe of Alaska (STA)
Year: 2017
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The body of research about microplastics in the ocean and their effect on marine and terrestrial animals has increased substantially in the past ten years. STA will collect water and subsistence food samples from four locations within STA's traditional territory to test for the presence of microplastics and associated toxins. These results will be compared to commercially purchased foods and the safety standards. STA will share these results with the public so people can make informed decisions about harvesting traditional foods. Local students will assist in sampling of local food and water. Proposed outputs include: 72 subsistence food samples, 18 commercial food samples, and 12 water samples collected and tested. Samples will be analyzed by the University of Alaska.

Chickaloon Native Village
Year: 2015
Air Quality, Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

This project seeks to educate the local community, empower them to take action regarding public health, air, water quality, fish, wildlife, and health in response to proposed coal surface strip mining. Also, the community will increase their awareness of the connection between coal surface strip mining, transporting, exporting, and consumption in relation to environmental impacts and how these impacts are being experienced locally, statewide, nationally, and globally. A final goal of the project will be to create a formal community stakeholder engagement plan, use an assessment of community concerns and goals, and develop a final Community Environmental Health Report to be shared with policy and decision-makers. It will include suggestions the community can act on locally to address the associated environmental and public health issues.

Kuskokwim River Watershed Council
Year: 2013

Water Quality
The Kuskokwim River Watershed Council will examine water quality standards and investigate sources of pollution by installing a fixed water quality monitoring station on the Kuskokwim River. The Council will use its findings to develop communications tools and a water quality training plan that enables standards, techniques and quality assurance plans to be disseminated to EPA Tribal environmental workers and Tribes across the Watershed.

Seldovia Village Tribe
Year: 2013
Water Quality, Toxic Substances

The Seldovia Village Tribe Safe Drinking Water Project will address the need to test residential wells and local waterways for contaminants including arsenic, iron and lead to determine if levels surpass EPA standards and present a health risk to community members. These test results will be used by the tribe’s Environmental Office to evaluate the extent of health risks posed to the community through unsafe drinking water and to strategize cost efficient ways to minimize toxic exposure to community members.

Yakutat Tlingit Tribe
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

The Yakutat Tlingit, a federally recognized tribe located on the Gulf of Alaska, plans to research the impact of toxic substances on area marine wetlands. Historically, the project area, Ankau Saltchucks, provided up to 30 % of the Tribe’s food supply. Dioxin contamination has limited the food supply, disrupted a significant source of traditional foods and has had a negative impact on Tribal cultural practices. Tribal members will be involved in a sampling effort to determine the nature, extent and sources of the contamination with an emphasis on determining if there are uncontaminated areas that are safe for Tribal subsistence activities. This project will also build community capacity through outreach, involvement and education of Tribal members and others.

Zender Environmental Health & Research Group
Year: 2011
Solid Waste Disposal

The “Alaska Tribal Environmental Justice Summit on Solid Waste” project seeks to reduce Tribal environmental health risks associated with solid waste management. The “Alaska Tribal Environmental Justice Summit on Solid Waste” will educate and engage tribal leaders and members in decision making processes. The overarching goals are to improve and enhance public and environmental health with substantially reduced environmental health risks associated with solid waste management (SWM). The objectives include (1) developing the Alaska Tribal EJ SWM: Beginning the Roadmap report to identify the needs, concerns, and potential next steps for Alaska Tribes (2) providing summit participants a SWM tool box of resources to assist tribes in solid waste management for their communities.

Anchorage Neighborhood Housing Services
Year: 2010

Air Quality, Water Quality
NeighborWorks Anchorage will utilize Justice Project grant funds to promote awareness and public involvement in the H2H project and the ultimate decision making process for the final route. Through NeighborWorks Anchorage’s existing resident council structure staff we will educate residents about the H2H process and the potential environmental and public health implications, including the potential impact to air and water quality. We will then facilitate a process to identify the residents’ main concerns regarding the project and develop a position statement on their behalf. Finally, through our existing Community Leadership Institute, we will empower the residents by training them in public speaking and effective advocacy skills. To complement our resident organizing capacity, we will partner with local stakeholders to provide technical expertise on the project.

Inupiat Community of the Arctic Slope (ICAS)
Year: 2008/2009
Water Quality

Ensuring that local people have a voice in the decision making on oil and gas development projects in their village and the offshore area adjacent to it, upon which they depend. This will be achieved by identifying and documenting subsistence practices of local indigenous people, identifying the marine resources upon which they depend, and incorporating that information into the development planning process, at a stage early enough that the information can be effectively utilized to avoid detrimental impacts.

Alaska Community Action for Toxics
Year: 2006/2007
Water Quality, Toxic Substances

ACAT research team will partner with the community to sample the water of the Suqi River to test for contaminants to identify the existing toxics to be remediated. ACAT will work together with community and partners to plan the restoration of the Suqi River.

Alaska Community Action on Toxics
Year: 2004
Community Resiliency

The residents on St. Lawrence Island will examine the health effects of hazardous substances by conducting and environmental health survey. The results of the survey will assist the community in identifying hazardous substances that affect their health. The purpose of the survey is to give residents accurate summary data about environmental contaminants.

Maniilaq Association
Year: 2004
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

The intent of this project is to expand scientific knowledge about the possible effects from different metals occurring from source contamination on subsistence food staples within the NW Arctic Borough. This information will help Tribal communities understand their environmental issues and develop solutions to public health concerns.

Village of Igiugig
Year: 2003
Solid Waste Disposal

The project will help determine the history of the dump site which was established by the Dept. of Defense and has been used to dispose of a variety of communications and construction materials. The dump site is close to the Igiugig School. The purpose of the project is to conduct research into the operational history of the site, develop an inventory of the contents, develop a strategy to clean up and cap the site and create a list of the possible human and environmental health threats posed by the site.

Aleknagik Traditional Council
Year: 2003
Solid Waste Disposal

This project is part of a long-term plan to provide training for the community’s landfill crew in safe solid and hazardous waste handling and removal procedures.

Port Graham Village Council
Year: 2002

Water Quality, Air Quality, Farming and Fishing
The project will address the effects of oil and gas leasing, exploration, development and production activities on Alaska Native subsistence resources, including acute and chronic impacts on drinking water, marine water, air, land and fisheries and marine mammal resources. Port Graham will lead the effort, among other Cook Inlet tribes, to develop and implement a strategic communications plan to improve the frequency and substance of oil and gas discussions. Implementation of the plan will include facilitated meetings (including two one-day information clinics), conferences and Internet list serves to enhance information exchange and to foster better dialogue on oil and gas issues among tribes. In addition, two liaisons will be appointed from each village to ensure participation and representation from all the villages.

Louden Tribal Council
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing

The purpose of this project is to conduct a baseline study to assess tissue contaminant levels in traditional foods, specifically Burbot fish. The project will also include an environmental education component involving students from the Galena City School who will participate in an independent study that will coincide with the sampling so they can witness the dissection techniques. In addition, the Louden Tribal Council will partner with the Tanana Chiefs Conference to conduct a workshop on traditional ecological knowledge and wisdom about Burbot fish and other fish resources.

Circle Village
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

This project will facilitate production of videos showing the relationship of the contamination of the environment in the local region as it is related to daily subsistence lifestyles. This project will also facilitate an understanding of the need for increased local participation in voicing concern about local environmental degradation and the need for remedial correction; increased understanding of the need for increased communication between the local native communities; and the agencies governing the Clean Air Act and the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

Alaska Center for the Environment
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency, Air Quality, Water Quality

Environmental Justice issues exist for Alaskan communities (native and/or economically disadvantaged) affected by Superfund Sites. The center will inform and educate the community about potential exposure to contaminants that may result from dependence on traditional subsistence. Affected communities lack access to information. The objective is to provide access to information about pollution problems that may affect them for independent technical interpretation of remedial investigations, feasibility studies, sampling data, etc. Develop research information with respect to hazardous substances in the environment and their potential effects and risks to human health. Also, provide information on water and air pollution sources and ways to eliminate them.

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Arizona

Southeast Arizona Area Health Education Center, Inc. (SEAHEC)
Year: 2018
Community Center Program Development and Water Outreach

SEAHEC, based in Nogales, has partnered with academia, government, and other health care organizations to provide community capacity-building and leadership training for health professional students and community health workers in rural southeast Arizona.  SEAHEC’s project focuses on the colonia of Winchester Heights in Cochise County, an isolated, unincorporated community where residents have been working with SEAHEC to improve public health.  The project continues building community capacity by developing an organizational structure for a newly-established community center and addressing drinking water quality by training community health workers on: 1) community involvement and education strategies, 2) conducting home visits to assess drinking water, and 3) remediation of drinking water issues through installation of water filters, application of chlorine, or addressing faulty pipes.  SEAHEC aims to recruit 4 community members as community health workers and 10 residents for the Community Action Committee that will develop a community action plan, and conduct up to 50 home visits to assess drinking water.  The University of Arizona will provide two public health interns and a bilingual project coordinator to support the project.

Friends of Rio de Flag (FoRio)
Year: 2017
Water Quality

The Rio de Flag runs through the Southside neighborhood of Flagstaff and floods periodically, directly affecting the quality of life of Southside residents. FoRio will lead a collaborative, community-based education and river planning initiative focused on Flagstaff’s underserved Southside neighborhood. Through this project, Southside residents will identify the economic and environmental hazards and health risks associated with periodic flooding and polluted local waterways. Friends of Rio de Flagg will develop reports on information gathered from community surveys, conduct three community listening forums, and host a larger community meeting. Public input from these activities will be included in watershed planning efforts and help decision makers prioritize watershed projects.

Sonora Environmental Research, Inc. (SERI)
Year: 2015
Water Quality

SERI, with the assistance of Tucson Water and the University of Arizona, will educate low-income families and develop a loan program to overcome the upfront cost of obtaining a rainwater harvesting system and to provide a mechanism for families to invest in a system to meet the needs for more effective water management. SERI will develop this program with community input and pilot the program with a minimum of 10 families for shade tree irrigation. The project also seeks to educate low-income families on other measures to reduce the urban heat island effect. Given the ongoing drought in the southwest and the long-term forecast for even hotter conditions, approaches for more effective water management are increasingly important for our communities.

Tolani Lake Enterprise
Year: 2014
Water Quality

In an effort to address increasing chronic drought and climate change, Tolani Lake Enterprise and its partners will seek to strengthen community capacity among members of the Navajo Nation to understand and address poor water quality and to create an action plan to seek and develop alternative clean water sources. Working with local policymakers, the organization will incorporate a culturally sensitive strategic planning process. The project will target 20 communities along the Little Colorado River Watershed that are negatively impacted by uranium contamination of surface, ground, and drinking waters. The organization will also work with Navajo Water Resources and federal agencies to test wells and other residential water sources in an effort to detect contaminants, develop a reporting system, and identify clean water sources.

Friends of the Santa Cruz River
Year: 2011
Water Quality

The Well Water Quality Monitoring in Vulnerable Populations within the Upper Santa Cruz Watershed project investigates hazardous substances in community water sources. The project will develop relationships with community residents, the Santa Cruz County Health Services Department, the University of Arizona, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), local high school students, and the Southern Arizona Area Health Education Center to investigate the water quality in the socially vulnerable and environmentally overburdened communities of Nogales; and Rio Rico. The investigation will provide valuable information on the presence of hazardous substances in community water sources that are not regularly monitored. The water sample analyses combined with a household survey, will allow research teams to develop exposure factors for vulnerable groups like pregnant women and children. Additionally, the project will also provide information about any differences in water quality between wet and dry seasons.

Forgotten People CDC
Year: 2008/ 2009
Water Quality

Identifying practical and effective solutions for the Diné communities in the western regions of the Navajo Nation in homes that do not have access to piped water, but rather require the water to be hauled and stored on premises. The data from the assessment phase will be useful in identifying and quantifying problems, and all stakeholders will then work together in transforming this information into an effective action plan to improve and provide safe access to drinking water.

Sonora Environmental Research Institute Inc. (SERI)/Comadres
Year: 2005
Community Resiliency

SERI seeks increase the capacity of the community of Ambos Nogales (Nogales, AZ and Nogales, Sonora) to understand and address a variety of environmental risks in their neighborhood, while working to collaboratively develop risk prevention and reduction measures. This project will train a group of community women on environmental issues, in addition to developing tools to identify high risk sources, prevention/compliance measures, and a community-based plan for emergency response. SERI will also promote community-wide awareness, create a partnership between the neighborhood team and industry to address risks, and use the new partnership to develop a strategic plan to reduce risks and improve public health. An evaluation will take place throughout the project with a final report at the end.

Just Transitions Alliance (JTA)
Year: 2003
Air Quality, Water Quality, Toxic Substances

The purpose of this project is to conduct research to document particulate matter in the air, heavy metals in the soil, and chemicals in local water associated with APC emissions and pesticide spraying by the State/Residents of Rilito, AZ. The research will establish a community-driven protocol to conduct health surveys of workers and community residents. The survey will document health concerns and will lead to an action plan to address health concerns and business and agency practices that contribute to environmental hazards.

Navajo Nation (NEPA Solid Waste Management)
Year: 2002
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

The Navajo Clean Air Act places responsibility for air pollution control and regulation on the Navajo Nation Air Quality Control Program (NNAQCP) within the Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency (NNEPA). NNAQCP regulates oil producers such as Texaco, Exxon-Mobil, U.S. Oil and other small oil producers located in Red Mesa and Aneth, Utah Chapters. The majority of Navajo residents within the Red Mesa and greater Aneth Utah areas have been affected by oil and gas operations since the 1950’s. In the 1950’s, the Navajo reservation had 860 oil producing wells and by 1964, there were approximately 1,000 producing wells on the reservation. The area also includes three major natural gas processing facilities, two large saltwater injection facilities, and dozens of tank batteries and waste disposal sites. These facilities routinely emit a wide range of toxic substances—e.g. hydrogen sulfide, volatile hydrocarbons, and sulfur dioxide to the local airshed. The University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Community Environmental Health Program and Masters in Public Health Program (all of which comprise are the UNM partners in this project) will provide technical assistance in the development of a community health survey. Local students will work with UNM collaborators to design an appropriate survey for community residents, to collect appropriate air monitoring data in collaboration with NNEPA, to collect associated geospatial data, and with the analytical assistance of UNM partners, to analyze and interpret those data. The results of the study will be reported back to the communities and be used as the basis for determining further needs and supporting further funding applications to appropriate agencies.

Downtown Southwest Neighborhood Association, Inc. (DSNA)
Year: 2001
Solid Waste Disposal

The Downtown Southwest Neighborhood Association, Inc., is a community-based nonprofit organization. Their purpose is to educate, clean and beautify the low income minority neighborhoods in Phoenix, Arizona. DSNA will serve as a liaison, and facilitator for parent-teacher meetings, and neighborhood forums. Some of the major activities include publishing a monthly newsletter and coordinate a community clean up and tree planting projects.

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Arkansas

Arkansas Interfaith and Light
Year: 2017
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

Arkansas Interfaith Power & Light proposes to renovate and repurpose an abandoned building and lot to become a local community center where individuals in at-risk areas of Little Rock will be introduced to holistic solutions to local energy production and healthy food alternatives. Renovation efforts will include stabilization of lead paint, energy efficiency improvements, and solar panel installations. Leading up to the opening of the community center, the organization will engage the community in organic gardening demonstrations, food distribution activities, and outdoor environmental education workshops. Several environmental programs will be demonstrated at the local community center including multiple community gardens and community workshops on energy efficiency products.

Arkansas Human Development Corp. (ADHC)
Year: 2003
Farming and Fishing

AHDC in Little Rock plans to provide capacity building skills training and knowledge to community-based organizations, health and non-health organizations and agencies who service the migrant and seasonal farm workers. Developing these skills will enable these organizations to better serve the farmers, growers and seasonal agricultural workers. The program will train health and non-health providers how to assist agricultural workers in accessing the services that will help them regarding pesticides and other environmental problems. The locally placed Ameri-Corps members will be used to establish personal links with migrant and seasonal farm working communities. This personal approach will be most effective for educational information that must be communicated. Education programs will be introduced through a variety of formats, including public workshops, focus groups, fairs and culturally sensitive materials. Community participation will be achieved through the high visibility and distribution of bilingual materials at the appropriate reading level of the migrant and seasonal farmworker population.

Arco Iris, Inc.
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing

This grassroots organizing, environmental education/information/training project concerning EJ and the environmental/environmental health problems related to the poultry-processing industry in Northwest Arkansas will seek to address a huge need that has been identified. It will feature development of bilingual curriculum & bilingual trainings/presentations/workshops on environmental issues (violations of CWA & SWDA in relation to poultry industry) to the immigrant community (Latinos now hold about 1/3 of chicken-industry jobs), coalition building, EJ training, research on industry (results to be compiled into a bilingual booklet to be shared with communities.). Target: communities and poultry industry workers in Fayetteville, Springdale, and Rogers, Arkansas composed of poor whites, African-Americans, Hispanics and Mexican, Central American and Marshall Island immigrants.

Monticello/Drew County Chamber of Commerce
Year: 2000
Solid Waste Disposal

In conjunction with the TEA Recycling/Monticello Transfer Station, Entergy, and Drew Central High School W.E.T. Team, the Monticello/Drew County Chamber of Commerce will work on these existing partnerships to enhance recycling effort. The project will educate the community on the importance of recycling, the effect on landfill use and effect of landfill use on water pollution, enhance understanding of environmental systems, and generate information on pollution prevention through community leader-based awareness activities. The target audience in East Monticello is a low economic, predominantly minority population.

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California

Vista Community Clinic (VCC)
Year: 2017
Toxic Substance

VCC will address the risks faced by domestic workers in the daily use of toxic household cleaning and air freshening products and the negative impact on their health and the environment. Located in North San Diego County, VCC will educate domestic workers regarding the public health risks faced in their work and homes and ways to reduce risks through precautionary measures and substitution of less toxic cleaning substances. The project will also educate workers on recycling practices of cleaning products and train social service providers, community health workers, and other agencies to continue domestic worker education. VCC will document the results of a needs assessment of domestic workers and develop educational tools and training materials. The project aims to engage approximately 400 domestic workers in the local area.

Asian Health Services (AHS)
Year: 2016
Reducing Indoor Air Pollution in Nail Salons

The project will focus on reducing chemical workplace exposures impacting local nail salon workers who are disproportionately exposed to carcinogenic and reproductively harmful chemicals resulting in headaches, dizziness, chronic asthma, memory loss, dermatitis, breathing difficulties, cancer and reproductive harm. The project is the next step in the Healthy Nail Salon Program operating in the project locations and will facilitate the process of accessing additional technical resources and funding needed for salons to transform into “Healthy Nail Salons.” The project will establish cross-sector partnerships with organizations and county departments to conduct tailored trainings for nail salon workers/owners about key “Healthy Nail Salon” concepts, related to chemical exposure reduction and proper hazardous waste disposal methods, and about the Healthy Nail Salon low-income loan program. These trained community liaisons and project partners will also provide public education via workshops and community outreach to educate residents.

Clinica del Salud de Valle de Salinas
Year: 2015
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

Proyecto La Semilla will train farmworkers who are parents and leaders in their communities to protect children from pesticides by becoming pesticide safety educators. The project will conduct eight one-day train-the-trainers workshops in eight agricultural communities for 120 parents. After attending the workshop each participant will conduct three peer presentations with a goal of training 100 more parents, so the training and follow up conducted will support the education of 1200 parents. Farmworkers and their children are at increased risk of acute and chronic exposures to pesticides through pesticide residues carried into their homes from the fields on the farmworkers’ clothes and shoes and pesticide applications to fields near their homes and schools.

Social & Environmental Entrepreneurs Fiscal Sponsor for Central CA EJ Network (CCEJN)
Year: 2015
Community Resiliency

This project is a multifaceted approach to building the capacity of the community to conduct community-based monitoring to address the environmental and public health issues identified in their community. The project will prepare five residents to complete and gain certification in three to four CalEPA regulatory courses. CCEJN will coordinate with trained community members to do three citizen science events, providing tools that will assist the trained community members to engage other residents in community monitoring that will inform them about the environmental and/or health characteristics within the community. Additionally, this project will help support the development of a handbook (or database) identifying, describing, and categorizing instruments that regulatory agencies have at their disposal to gather environmental data. This handbook will not only be helpful for community members, but it will also help other regulatory agencies understand the capacity and jurisdictions of other agencies.

Community Water Center (CWC)
Year: 2015
Water Quality

Community Water Center (CWC) will provide capacity building, organizing support and technical assistance to low-income, predominantly Latino communities in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California to foster effective community participation in local water decision-making, and enable community members to collaborate with other partners (agencies, organizations and decision-makers) to secure safe and affordable drinking water solutions. The specific goals of this project are to: 1) inform residents of impacted communities about the toxic chemicals in their water supplies, the potential health impacts and how to access safe and clean drinking water; 2) reduce the potential exposure to toxic chemicals in groundwater that serves as the source of drinking water for communities in the San Joaquin Valley; 3) promote community capacity building to understand and participate effectively in water policy and planning decision-making affecting drinking water in the southern San Joaquin Valley; and 4) address the cumulative impacts of pollution in drinking water sources through collaboration between residents, community-based organizations and local government. This work is especially important given the severe drought in California.

Environmental Health Coalition
Year: 2014
Air Quality, Pollution

The Environmental Health Coalition (EHC) will collaborate with key stakeholders in an effort to reduce air pollution in the low-income Latino neighborhood of Barrio Logan by creating a plan to implement Transportation and Land Use (TLU) policies as recommended in the Port of San Diego Climate Action Plan (CAP). The organization will host a series of seven workshops designed to engage and empower community members to address the air pollution generated by waterfront activity including toxic emissions from area shipyards. EHC will also work with local and federal government officials to analyze current policies that address air pollution, develop priorities, create strategies, and implement measures that are practical and beneficial to the community.

Asian Health Services
Year: 2013
Toxic Substances

Asian Health Services seeks to develop and pilot a model of effective community engagement and outreach within California’s nail salon community. The project will empower Vietnamese salon workers to address the unique environmental and health challenges that result from chronic and cumulative exposures to chemicals known or suspected to be carcinogenic and reproductively harmful. The organization’s goals are to: increase the community’s knowledge of healthy/green nail salon concepts and practices; build capacity of the nail salon community to adopt best practices for workplace health and safety; and train and support nail salon community members to become leaders who promote and educate their peers about healthy/green nail salon concepts and practices.

The Watershed Project
Year: 2013
Solid Waste Disposal

The Watershed Project seeks to transform Fairmont Elementary into a zero‐waste environment by training students in the 4Rs and engaging them in their day to day routines. The project features training in source reduction, trash separation, recycling, composting, and implementation of a sustainable program of these practices. As part of the program, students will take these practices to their families and initiate zero‐waste in their homes.

Center for Community Action and Environmental Justice
Year: 2013
Air Quality

The organization will implement an asthma prevention and education program providing outreach, training and healthcare referral services to low-income, Hispanic residents in the cities of San Bernardino and Jurupa Valley, California. Training will consist of a series of workshops where residents will learn about asthma symptoms and triggers. Other benefits include in-home medical visits by healthcare professionals from area clinics.

Environmental Health Coalition
Year: 2013
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The “Changing Land Use Policies, Changing Lives” project will support communities in developing the skills and competencies needed for meaningful participation in decision-making about land use policies that affect communities. Through a series of training workshops and community outreach, the project will address equitable community planning practices and land uses in underserved neighborhoods. Community members will be able to use training resources to learn how to engage government officials and contribute to policy and regulatory efforts that result in the reduction of exposure to toxic chemicals and promote improved air quality. 

Center for Race, Poverty and the Environment
Year: 2012
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances, Air Quality, Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The Center for Race, Poverty and the Environment Leadership Development Institute will focus on building community skills that teach residents how to access and participate in local decision-making on issues impacting the community's health. The project will provide training on environmental laws, the regulatory process and environmental health policy in the San Joaquin Valley. The Institute will also assist in establishing sustainable, organic community farms to increase access to healthy food. The Valley is home to high rates of air pollution from pesticides, transport and confined animal feeding operations as well as soil and water contamination from industrial farming and waste dumping.

Fresno Metropolitan Ministry
Year: 2012
Community Resiliency  

The Fresno Metropolitan Ministry will help community members in Fresno County to better understand their disproportionate exposure to multiple environmental harms through a series of workshops and presentations during community meetings. As a result, the communities will learn about the health impacts of environmental hazards, existing laws designed to mitigate exposure and how to recognize and report violations. The project will also establish the Fresno Environmental Reporting Network (FERN) website, a countywide community friendly site that allows residents to report environmental hazards and allows the responsible local and state agencies to investigate potential violations.

East Bay Asian Local Development Corp
Year: 2012
Air Quality, Community Resiliency

The East Bay Asian Local Development Corp. (EBALDC) will empower community members to address environmental and public health issues associated with planned local development projects. The project will engage community members in the process of collecting local data on air quality to better illustrate the potential impacts that planned development and resulting increases in traffic will have on the area. The project will develop a Chinatown Community Platform to articulate the community’s health priorities around air pollution and establish criteria for future development as it relates to traffic, air quality, and neighborhood design.

The Sierra Fund
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

The Sierra Fund Gold County Circuit Rider will reach out to area health care providers and community leaders in an effort to prevent and mitigate exposure to legacy mining toxins such as mercury, arsenic, lead and asbestos in California’s Sierra Nevada. The workshops and training will present information about mercury in fish and findings about other toxins in mine tailings. There will also be information about potential health impacts and measures to reduce exposure. Community residents, health professionals, tribal leaders and scientists will work together through this project to bring information and tools to individuals in the rural Sierra Nevada region of California. The project will conduct outreach in four communities by providing residents with educational materials including data analyses to address legacy mining pollution in the region.

Boat People SOS, Inc.
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

Boat People, SOS (BPSOS) will use a multi-pronged approach to addressing the environmental and public health threats posed by hazardous work practices in nail salons. The project will educate health providers, regulators, salon owners and technicians, and community leaders about safe practices and health impacts associated with exposure to chemicals in salon products. The organization will also examine ways to reduce exposure to these toxins. The program design will include four types of activities: (1) community outreach using the mass and small media, (2) training workshops for nail salon owners and workers, (3) technical assistance for both workers and employers exposed to workplace hazards, and (4) building long-term capacity for salon owners and technicians to be involved in local and federal decision making processes.

Community Services Unlimited, Inc.
Year: 2011
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The “Growing Healthy: Reducing Exposure to Toxins in our Community” project teaches organic agriculture to youth in South Central Los Angeles. The project will teach youth in South Central Los Angeles about sustainable urban agriculture techniques and engage them in teaching other community youth and adults about the benefits of adopting healthy eating habits, methods used to reduce exposure to toxins, and ways to mitigate climate change. By teaching students how to grow food organically, the project will increase community access to healthy fresh produce and raise awareness about reducing exposure to lead and pesticides.

Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice
Year: 2011
Air Quality

The Kings County Diesel Education, Emission Reduction and Environmental Health Project aims to reduce diesel emissions in San Joaquin Valley communities. The project seeks to reduce diesel emissions impacting the air quality of Kettleman City and Avenal, where primarily low income, Spanish-speaking Latinos reside. The project will create a diesel education and emissions program model that can be distributed to other San Joaquin Valley communities that are impacted by diesel pollution. Greenaction will conduct community outreach to educate stakeholders (including community members, businesses, truckers and trucking companies, schools, bus drivers and parents) about diesel issues impacting their community and encourage equipment changes that will lead to a reduction of emissions and improve residents’ respiratory health.

Community Water Center
Year: 2011
Water Quality  

The Protecting Groundwater from the Ground Up project educates San Joaquin Valley residents to reduce and prevent drinking water contamination. The project will educate disadvantaged rural communities in the San Joaquin Valley of California about the causes and effects of drinking water pollution and empower residents to take actions to reduce and prevent contamination of the region’s drinking water sources. Community Water Center will provide technical and advocacy assistance to San Joaquin Valley residents facing water challenges, utilize various strategies to reach and educate residents about the pervasive lack of safe drinking water, provide water quality trainings to residents who want to become more engaged in San Joaquin Valley drinking water protection efforts and facilitate the direct participation of residents in public venues where water quality decisions are made.

Center for Community Action & Environmental Justice (CCAEJ)
Year: 2011
Air Quality

The Engaging Schools in Addressing Air Pollution from Diesel Sources project will address diesel emission threats to children and minority populations in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. This project will build community capacity and awareness of local environmental threats to children and residents in low income, communities of color living in heavily polluted areas of Riverside and San Bernardino County. CCAEJ proposes to focus on schools and other child oriented facilities. CCAEJ expects to better inform local residents’ of the environmental conditions within their community. The school-based Platform for Action will train students and parents on how to use P-Trac instruments to take air sample readings of ultra fine particles, how to download the data on a computer, and how to develop graphs and presentations in order to share the findings with others in the community.

Yurok Tribe Project
Year: 2010
Community Resiliency 

The issue to be addressed is building tribal capacity on climate change in order to understand the technical issues associated with climate change research and modeling and to engage and educate the community and develop partnerships in order to begin adaptation planning. Located on the lower part of the Klamath River, in parts of Del Norte and Humboldt Counties, the Yurok Reservation faces significant environmental impacts from climate change including coastal erosion, the rise of sea levels, and increased flooding in the Klamath River watershed. The largest and poorest federally recognized tribe within California, the Yurok Reservation hopes to build tribal government and community capacity via technical training of the program staff and participation in national meetings. The project will engage the reservation community in potential localized changes through the production of educational materials, including a brochure outlining various opportunities to participate in local and regional climate change planning efforts. The final goal of the project is the preparation and completion of the Yurok Tribe Climate Change Prioritization Plan and an initial assessment of potential climate change impacts that will serve as a guide for future tribal climate change research and planning efforts

Scott’s Valley Band of Pomo Indians
Year: 2010
Job Training

The Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians is one of six federally recognized Tribes in Lake County, California, comprising the Hinthill Environmental Resource Consortium (HERC). The Scotts Valley Tribe will use an Environmental Justice Small Grant, and Dept of Energy funding, to implement a Weatherization Energy Program to reduce energy consumption in tribal housing and commercial buildings. The Program will include energy evaluations, conservation consultations, and building retrofitting for energy efficiency. In addition to the energy reduction benefits, the Program will increase the Tribe's environmental capacity by providing Tribal members with training for specialized "green" jobs. Energy evaluations and retrofits will be completed by program trainees and graduates, teamed with energy professionals and contractors, providing program participants with the necessary hands-on experience to become licensed California Weatherization Contractors.

Urban Habitat
Year: 2010 
Community Resiliency

Urban Habitat will use an Environmental Justice Small Grant to support the Community Climate Action Engagement Project in Richmond, California. The purpose of the project is to 1) increase the Richmond community's ability to engage in the development of an Energy and Climate Action Plan (ECAP); and 2) to engage Richmond's decision makers in addressing the impacts that climate change has on the city's low-income communities and communities of color. The organization will accomplish this by creating and implementing a "Climate Justice Curriculum" that connects climate change to local and regional efforts around transportation justice, affordable housing, equitable development and quality green jobs. It will build public awareness regarding the threats of climate change and the benefits of developing a local ECAP through public alerts and briefing sessions, and work to increase the capacity of Richmond residents and stakeholders to help them participate effectively in planning efforts related to climate change.

The Watershed Project
Year: 2010
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The Watershed Project, a non-profit organization with a 13-year history of working in the Richmond community, will lead the Richmond Greenway Bioswale and Native Plant Garden (Greenway Garden) project, a community based effort to transform a section of abandoned railroad into a transportation, education, and recreation resource for the community. The project will set an example for the City by using low impact biological and cost effective ways of removing storm water pollutants, as well as encourage green approaches to cleaning local storm waters. The Greenway Garden will restore a wildlife habitat in the heart of urban Richmond, educate the surrounding community about local gardening and demonstrate how the native habitat can reduce the need for pesticides in adjacent vegetable and fruit gardens. The project is designed to improve water quality in the Bay by reducing storm water and urban runoff pollution, increasing awareness of Low Impact Design best management practices, and increasing environmental literacy in the Richmond community.

Rose Foundation
Year: 2010
Air Quality, Community Resiliency

The Rose Foundation's New Voices Are Rising Program is a youth-focused community-driven environmental justice and civic engagement project that works with students from low-income communities and communities of color in Oakland and Richmond, California. With a $25,000 EJ Small Grant, the Rose Foundation will help students explore the concepts of environmental justice, and allow youth to learn by actively engaging in legislative and regulatory processes. Participating students will attend an intensive summer program focusing on strategies for addressing climate change, as well as a series of classroom presentations on environmental health, environmental civics, and the connections between air pollution environmental health disparities in low-income communities and communities of color in San Francisco's East Bay. They will learn about the federal, state, and local roles in developing laws and regulations that impact climate change, air pollution, and community health, and they will also learn key analytical tools and public speaking skills that will encourage them to participate effectively in public efforts to improve air quality.

Marin Community Clinic (MCC)
Year: 2010 
Toxic Substances, Air Quality, Community Resiliency

The Viviendo Verde Ya! Project will expand the role of promotores (community health workers) in the Canal district by working with Promotores Verdes (a grassroots organization) to mentor a network of volunteer environmental leaders, advocate for environmental change in the community, and develop a community endorsed and scientifically reviewed toolkit designed to meaningfully engage the Latino/Indigenous community in environmental change. The expected results include 1) the adoption of Integrated Pest Management practices and a reduction in pesticide use in the home, 2) strategies to reduce water intrusion and mold growth in the home to improve air quality and reduce asthmagens, and 3) a reduction in the use of toxic substances including pesticides in the workplace. Finally, local government, school, and housing improvements that reduce toxic exposures, improve indoor air quality, and improve community knowledge about local consequences of climate changes.

Amigos de los Rios
Year: 2010
Air Quality, Water Quality   

Amigos de los Rios, a non-profit organization, aims to strengthen community life, preserve the environment and improve healthy living in the underserved areas of the San Gabriel Valley and East County Los Angeles through the Emerald Necklace Project. The project is a direct response to the health and environmental challenges that coincide with the poor air quality and green house gas emissions faced by residents living in the urban core. Emerald Necklace will on focus on creating healthy cities by providing valuable training to the community on issues including air, water quality and greenhouse gas emissions, and creating green infrastructure to address these challenges in a holistic manner.

Community Services Unlimited, Inc.
Year: 2010 
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The goal of this project is to teach the youth in South Central Los Angeles about sustainable urban agriculture to promote healthy eating, reduce exposure to toxins, and mitigate and adapt to climate change. Through teaching residents how to grow food naturally, the project will increase community residents' access to healthy produce, while also raising awareness about, and reducing exposure to, lead and pesticide hazards.

Communities for a Better Environment
Year: 2010  
Community Resiliency

The goal of this project is to provide a bridge connecting the existing work of Youth EJ on the direct health impacts of fossil fuel emissions to the broader impacts of fossil fuels causing climate change. CBE will hold new fossil fuel leadership training for youth who are active in the EJ communities of South East LA and Wilmington on the global and local impacts of fossil fuels, work with youth to carry out simple, alternative energy demonstration projects, and continue youth involvement on local fossil fuel policy. The youth leaders will help tremendously by learning the facts about fossil fuels, climate change, and practical solutions, educating their friends and family, and increasing their leadership skills to address these environmental issues.

Communities for a Better Environment
Year: 2008/2009
Air Quality

Conducting a strategic, community-level mobile source emissions inventory of the Hegenberger Corridor where community members will perform diesel truck counting in the community. CBE will then analyze that data to quantify the amount of mobile source pollution residents are exposed to, address the diesel truck routes in the area, and build local awareness and develop community-based structures to mobilize support for an inclusive planning process.

Committee for a Better Arvin
Year: 2008/2009
Air Quality, Toxic Substances, Water Quality, Community Resiliency

Increasing community awareness about the health impacts caused by local environmental issues such as poor air quality, pesticide spraying, and contaminated drinking water; and building the community’s capacity to address the public health hazards by engaging them in local land use decisions. Through education campaigns and community trainings, the recipient will bring together community residents and local decision-makers to foster dialogue and collaboration to address the many environmental hazards facing Arvin.

Center for Community Action & Environmental Justice
Year: 2008/2009 
Air Quality

Developing a work team in San Bernardino County communities living near the BNSF rail yards to provide outreach and education about particulate pollution and the resulting health risks in San Bernardino. The team will assist in developing materials and a training plan for community health workers regarding air pollution for use in the CCAEJ community health worker curriculum.

Pacific Institutes for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security
Year: 2007
Air Quality, Pollution

The identified issue for this project is exposure to diesel emissions and other environmental hazards associated with inappropriate land use within West Oakland. The environmental and/or public health result desired is a reduction in exposure to such hazards. Pacific Institutes and the WOEIP plan to achieve their desired goal through: (1) incorporating the community's vision into existing land use plans for the reuse of the Oakland Army Base and the City of Oakland; (2) convening all relevant stakeholders including business, Port of Oakland, and the City to participate on the Land Use Workgroup to develop and implement solutions; and (3) working with the City and other government entities to change existing policies to favor land uses with less environmental impacts.

Environmental Health Coalition
Year: 2006/2007
Air Quality

The project is striving for a reduction in the residents’ exposure to air pollution from the existing operations of the terminals and port district. Environmental Health Coalition will form a collaborative working group to identify environmental health problems associated with the existing operations of the National City Marine Terminal and the Tenth Avenue Marine Terminal operated by the San Diego Unified Port District on adjacent neighborhoods and develop a plan to reduce diesel particulate and other pollution from existing and the proposed expansion of these operations.

Asian Pacific Environmental Network
Year: 2006/2007
Community Resiliency

The purpose of the Richmond Environmental Justice Community Leadership Project is to build the leadership and capacity of Richmond’s Laotian refugee community to address the immediate and long term environmental justice and public health hazards and risks posed by urban development and land use decisions; and to work with partner organizations in making their efforts more effective. Richmond is currently in the preliminary stages of updating its General Plan. APEN will use the process as a means to engage and educate their members on these issues and participate in the updating process to build relationships with other potential partners.

Asian Pacific Environmental Network APEN
Year: 2005
Community Resiliency

APEN aims to build the leadership, capacity, and political effectiveness of Oakland’s low income Asian immigrant community to address the immediate and long term environmental and public health risks posed by the 60 acres, port-owned, Oak to 9th Street site. As a result of training and leadership development workshops, the residents will develop the skills to analyze and address the environmental and public health concerns in their community. In turn, these community members will work to maintain and build sustainable relationships between communities, and increase awareness and engagement. The project will culminate with a public education and media campaign.

Center for Community Action and Environmental Justice
Year: 2004
Water Quality, Toxic Substances

Wyle Labs Multiple Source Contamination Identification Program: the community of Norco will examine the effects of a hazardous weapons-testing facility (Wyle Labs) by conducting a community health survey. Results from the health survey will be mapped to identify thyroid cancer clusters along contaminated groundwater plumes.

Neighborhood House of North Richmond

Year: 2004
Air Quality

North Richmond Indoor Air Quality Research Project is a community-driven indoor air quality research project where data collection methodologies designed for community participation will be set up indoors to measure diesel Particulate Matter (air toxics) levels from stationary and mobile sources. The results will be used for indoor air mitigation strategies and to catalog solutions to reduce diesel pollution in the affected locale. Additionally, funding sources for implementation of the alternatives will be identified.

American Lung Association of San Diego and Imperial Counties
Year: 2003
Air Quality

This project will conduct further research to detect and assess hazardous air emissions from the Mid City, Chollas Park area of San Diego. This project will collect hazardous air emissions data from the Chollas Park area to determine the specific levels of hazardous contaminants. A report will be compiled that presents the results of the hazardous air contaminants and evaluates the risks to respiratory health to nearby residents of Mid City. The Chollas Park area was once a former dump site converted to a park. Nearby schools and residents are concerned about airborne emissions of hazardous contaminants. Mid City is a low-income diverse community located in the central inner city region of San Diego.

City and County of San Francisco
Year: 2003
Air Quality

The goal is to gather ambient air quality data and use this data to implement measures that will improve the air quality in the Bayview Hunters Point community. The community-based organization, Literacy for Environmental Justice will conduct outreach and education. The information will be about monitoring data, health effects and sources of pollution reported throughout the project. A “State of the Air Report” will be written to support community, government and industry initiatives that address the air quality issues in this distressed community. Bay-CAMP is a partnership of the City of San Francisco, Literacy for Environmental Justice, the California Air Resources Board and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD).

City of Richmond Public Services
Year: 2003
Solid Waste Disposal, Air Quality, Water Quality

This project will identify “hot spots” in the neighborhood where illegal dumping of solid waste is endangering local residents. In this community there also exist regional sources of air pollution and water pollution that drain into and contaminate the San Francisco Bay.

Environmental Center of San Luis Obispo (ECOSLO)
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances  

This project will examine pesticide safety training programs and find more effective alternative ways to help workers obtain, understand and retain the information. This safety information is provided to the Farmworkers, including the Spanish speaking migrant farm workers, who work closely with pesticides and risk contaminating themselves and their children if they misunderstand pesticide safety information.

Fuerza Campesina/Empowering Lives, Building Communities
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

This project will conduct a train-the-trainer program on pesticides and safe drinking water issues for agriculture workers in the Imperial Valley and their families.

Planning and Conservation League Foundation
Year: 2003
Community Resiliency

The purpose of this project is to conduct research to better educate disenfranchised communities to better represent themselves and their issues in land use and public participation. The study will also identify how to best provide technical assistance to EJ communities in the Sacramento area to facilitate their participation in land use decisions.

West Oakland Asthma Coalition Prescott-Joseph Center for Community Enhancement Performance of Tools for Schools
Year: 2003
Air Quality

The project will facilitate the evaluation of indoor air in three Oakland Public Schools, with a focus on asthma triggers. The Coalition will be working with the schools to implement pest and mold control. The Coalition will also conduct workshops to educate the families about asthma triggers and the reduction of the elements that cause asthma in the home.

Elem Pomo Tribe
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

The purpose of the project is to research and develop the Human Health Risk Assessment Scenario to assess risks resulting from substances released from Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine Superfund site. For decades, this abandoned open pit mercury mine has released mercury, arsenic and other hazardous substances affecting Tribal trust resources and other natural resources within the Tribe’s ancestral homelands. Members of the Elem Indian colony engage in activities using potentially contaminated natural resources to a greater extent than others, exposing the Elem people to greater human health risks. Traditionally, the Elem depended on fish consumption as the main protein source in their diet. The health department published a mercury contamination notice for the fish in Clearlake, CA (the Elem fishing grounds). Since that time, the tribe’s consumption of fish has dropped dramatically. The Elem are experiencing a “suppression” effect from the contamination and the nature and extent of this suppression is one of the biological factors that will be assessed. HHRA will provide exposure data and establish safe consumption levels of fish and other resources.

Family Support Center of the Mid-Peninsula
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency, Toxic Substances, Air Quality

Funds will be used to sponsor a one day community outreach event. This event will educate parents and children about environmental issues in the community. At the event, participants will receive educational materials from agencies, supplies for students, free health screening, and greening events. Surveys and results will be conducted and community workshops will be facilitated. This educational activity fits with the goal of getting more residents involved in issues of hazardous waste identification and disposal, lead poisoning, and air pollution.

Citizens for West Oakland Revitalization
Year: 2002
Air Quality

The purpose of this project is to develop a collaboration between researchers and community advocates addressing severe air pollution issues in the West Oakland Community. Pacific Institute and CWOR will work with the Environmental Indicators Project Coordinating Team to prioritize alternatives that will reduce diesel emissions in the neighborhood caused from the thousands of truck trips per day that route around and through the West Oakland community doing business with the Port of Oakland. The second phase of this project is for Pacific Institute to do the necessary research and assessment necessary to develop a Work plan to implement the alternative option. Finally, the last phase will involve CWOR assisting with the research, work plan development and data analysis work.

Communities for a Better Environment
Year: 2002
Air Quality

This project will involve the development and implementation of a community monitoring project that utilizes CBE's "Bucket Brigade" model to monitor air pollution levels in the Wilmington area of Los Angeles. This project will enable residents to influence policy decisions, provide training to impacted residents on how to identify and monitor local industrial polluters, liaison residents with the media, public officials and oversight agencies to improve conditions in their neighborhoods, and build capacity of the residents to hold involved parties accountable.

Organizacion en CA de Lideres Campesinas
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances

The indigenous Misteco and Triqui Campesinas Campaign Against the Misuse of Pesticides Project will recruit and train low-income, rural, limited-English proficient women and girls of indigenous Mexican backgrounds to become community resources and advocates on a range of cross-cutting issues. Some of the addressed issues will include occupational health and safety, pesticides, women’s health and environmental justice. The goals of this project are to improve contact and coordination among a variety of stakeholders by facilitating communication and information exchange to address adverse exposure to pesticides. These groups include pesticide interest groups, government regulatory/enforcement agencies and indigenous farm worker women and their families. The second goal is to build community capacity to identify local environmental justice problems and actively involve affected community members in the implementation of program activities. To achieve this, Lideres Campesinas provides leadership development training and workshops on the Worker Protection Standards Act so they can become involved in civic efforts to curtail pesticide poisoning of indigenous farm workers and promote healthy alternatives. The third goal is to enhance community understanding of environmental and public health information systems. A train-the-trainer model used in our project will result in the community-based environmental protection of indigenous farm worker women and their families, with emphasis on those who are not fluent in either English or Spanish and/or are non-literate and semi-literate.

Agricultural Land-Based Training Association (ALBA)
Year: 2002
Water Quality

This project specifically addresses the EPA “impaired waterbody” designation under the Clean Water Act. Goal is to reduce nitrate pollution of groundwater and drinking water sources for Latino population in N. Salinas Valley Watershed. This proposal seeks to work with ALBA participating-growers to determine the existence and extent of leaching from their organically-managed crop fields. The farmers will be involved in data collection, as well as in setting up small-scale check-plots with limited nitrogen inputs to test for differences in leaching between different on-farm practices. In addition, farmers will help develop nitrogen budgets for their fields to estimate potential nitrogen loss from the system.

Earth Island Institute (Ma’at Youth Academy)
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing

The Environmental Coalition for Community Health (ECCH) program will conduct further research investigating bay fish contaminant levels in the Richmond Marina. The area studied by the fish consumption survey consists of Richmond’s Iron Triangle, Parchester Village, North Richmond and San Pablo communities. The program will provide a comprehensive analysis of environmental hazard in aquatic ecosystems and potential adverse impacts on public health. The data from the 2001 fish survey will be analyzed to determine residents’ exposure to contaminants in fish. Results of survey will be broadly disseminated.

Campesinos Unidos, Inc. (CUI)
Year: 2001
Farming and Fishing, Community Capacity

Campesinos Unidos, Inc. (CUI), is a community-based, grassroots organization that serves migrant farm workers in the County of Imperial, CA, a rural isolated county of 145,000 residents, more than 80 percent of whom are Spanish-speaking. The vast majority of residents endure living conditions impacted by unemployment, poverty, and geographical, cultural, and linguistic isolation. Their goals are to identify necessary improvements in communication and coordination between stakeholders and create partnerships among the residents. They will build community capacity to better identify and appropriately respond to local environmental justice problems. Through a train-the-trainer activity this project will enhance the community’s understanding of environmental and public health information systems.

Environmental Health Coalition
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency  

The purpose of the Barrio Logan/Logan Heights environmental justice project is to improve and coordinate communication among the various stakeholders in the community, to enhance community understanding of environmental pollution problems, and to empower the community to take a proactive role in identifying and working toward solutions to these problems. The Barrio Logan/Logan Heights communities were designated by the Environmental Justice Interagency.

Community Building Institute
Year: 2001 
Solid Waste Disposal

The Community Building Institute is a nonprofit organization for youth and young adults in East Palo Alto. Their purpose is to prepare at-risk young people to assume positive, nonviolent roles in the family, school, and community. Their goal is to promote social responsibility, provide job readiness skills and community service activities between youth and young adults. They will conduct a community-wide campaign to provide information and education to residents about the illegal and unsafe dumping of hazardous and/or toxic waste materials onto more than 20 vacant lots in the community. They will target residents with a particular emphasis on non-English speaking residents who do not have access to information in their own languages.

Concerned Citizens South Central LA
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

Concerned Citizens of South Central Los Angeles is a nonprofit grassroots organization. Their mission is to work to improve the quality of life for all residents in the Vernon Central community of South Central LA. They will address the issue of information dissemination and public participation in the clean up process of a Middle School built on a contaminated site. Their goal is to ensure that contamination is cleaned up and that the community is aware of and involved in the process. A youth education and empowerment program will also be a part of this project.

Asian Pacific Environmental Network
Year: 2001 
Toxic Substances

The Asian Pacific Environmental Network (APEN) launched the first community capacity building effort in the Laotian community of West Contra Costa County in 1995. Their goal is to bring together the different ethnic groups of the Laotian community to organize, develop indigenous leadership, and build the capacity of the community to work for social and environmental justice. This project will focus on improving the county’s disclosure of the release of toxic substances and their impact on human health, and the delivery of this information to the Laotian and other non-English speaking communities.

Career Training Institute
Year: 2001 
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

Career Training Institute (CTI) is a grassroots, a community-based, agency located in East Oakland, CA. The project will address problems related to the cleanup of the toxic brownfield site, K & L Plating, located on 89th Avenue, adjacent to residential properties (a large public housing project is located four blocks from the plant) where families are growing vegetables. CTI has entered a joint venture with several agencies to address environmental problems existing in the neighborhood. A group of seven neighborhood organizations in the East Oakland district joined together to fight poverty, unemployment, pollution, and 700 toxic and hazardous sites identified in their community. The goals of this project are to improve communication and coordination among all stakeholders and build the community’s capacity to identify local environmental justice problems. CTI will conduct quarterly workshops and bimonthly meetings to keep the community informed of their cleanup progress. Students along with Community for Better Environment and consultants will perform soil and groundwater tests.

Organizacion en California de Lideres Campesinas, Inc.
Year: 2001
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

Organizacion en California de Lideres Campesinas is a private, nonprofit, statewide organization dedicated to bettering the lives of farm worker women and their families. The purpose of this project is to develop the skills of 15-20 farm worker women to serve as community advocates and educate other farm worker women on how to protect themselves, their families and their communities from the health dangers (pesticide poisoning and hazardous field sanitation conditions) facing farm worker families.

Coronado Neighborhood Council, Inc.
Year: 2001 
Job Training, Water Quality

Community Youth Council for Leadership and Education (CYCLE), is a community based and nonprofit organization that engages in community projects. CYCLE will enhance the community’s understanding of environmental and public health issues through the design of training activities. CYCLE utilizes a combination of activities that generate employment opportunities in an environmental context. The project will conduct research and surveys involving investigations and studies relating to the causes, extent, prevention, reduction and elimination of water pollution along the Greenway Corridor. The study will identify the natural creek bed and suggest measures to bring life to it and investigate the possibility of establishing the corridor’s physical drainage lines and types. CYCLE will collaborate with local residents and schools, city administration, businesses of interest and other community groups in executing the study. They will conduct workshops to build the community’s capacity. The workshops will identify the specific elements of the study; assist participants to design the training to meet their needs and set learning goals for effective awareness, cognitive understanding and behavioral skill building.

Washoe Tribe of California and Nevada
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

The project will develop a Human Health Risks Assessment Scenario (HHRA Scenario) to assess the unique human health risks to members of the Washoe Tribe resulting from hazardous substances released from the Leviathan Mine Superfund site. For decades, Leviathan Mine-an abandoned open pit sulfur mine has released arsenic, copper, and another hazardous substances affecting tribal trust resources and other natural resources within Tribe's ancestral homelands. Members of the Washoe Tribe engage in activities using potential contaminated natural resources to a greater extent than others, exposing the Washoe people to greater health risks. Standard presumptions upon which human health risk assessments are based will not take into account traditional and customary Washoe tribal uses of the affected resources. Absent human health risk factors developed specifically to address these traditional and customary uses, the human health risk assessment will fail to establish appropriate remediation goals and the site will continue to expose the Washoe people to an unacceptable level of risk following remediation of the site.

Earth Island Institute/Ma’at Youth Academy
Year: 2000
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The Ma’at Youth Academy project will increase the community’s awareness on the problem of consuming contaminated fish. The industrialized shorelines of Richmond, Martinez and Oakland has been identified by the San Francisco Regional Water Control Board as the bay most toxic hot spots. One of the main areas of concerns is the Richmond sites which is home to United Heckathorn, a Superfund site. A 1997 report by the San Francisco Estuary Institute found high concentrations of PCBs, mercury, DDT, dieldrin, chlordane and dioxin in bay fishes. Through research, public education, the project’s goal is to create a system of community monitors to minimize human exposure to environmental hazards to preserve good health in communities of color and low-income areas, especially as it applies to children.

Specific objectives of the project are: (1) Reduce public exposure to DDT, lead and methyl mercury found in fish in the Richmond Mariana; (2) Actively involve community residents in reducing source and non-point source pollutants discharged to the bay; and (3) Educate community residents about elevated contaminants levels in fish in the Richmond Marina, potential health effects and ways to minimize health risks.

California Indian Basket Weaver Association
Year: 2000
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

Pesticides are used in the rural areas of northwestern California in and near Indian reservations and communities. California Indians are impacted disproportionately by pesticide use, because they live primarily in rural areas and maintain a predominately subsistence lifestyle. Women and children are most at risk because it is the women who do most of the gathering and processing of basketry plants. Children often accompany their mothers while gathering and are more sensitive to pesticide poisoning. Affected by the disproportionate use of pesticides in their communities are Indians from twelve tribes whose ancestral territories are located in Del Norte, Humboldt, Trinity, and Siskiyou Counties.

The use of pesticides and other hazardous substances by timber companies in northwestern California has been a concern of California Indian basket weavers and Native people for decades. It impacts people's health as well as plants and animals Native people rely on for subsistence and other traditional uses. The California Indian Basket Weaver will do the following research: (1) Compilation and analysis of information on existing laws, regulations and policies governing pesticide use notification and reporting systems; (2) Determining the nature and extend of programs to monitor community and individual drinking water sources for pesticide contamination; (3) Design a follow-up study to assess any gaps in information on drinking water contamination by pesticides; and (4) Acquiring current and historic pesticide use records. There will be outreach activities to communicate the results of the above research as well as distribution of informational materials.

Boat People S.O.S Inc. (California)
Year: 2000

Toxic Substances
Boat People S.O.S will implement an educational and outreach program to address carbon monoxide poisoning and lead contamination in Southeast Asian communities in Sacramento, California. Due to language and cultural barriers, most Indochinese refugees are not well informed of health and environmental issues affecting them. This Health and Environmental Risks Awareness Project (HERAP) will seek to empower the seriously disadvantaged population of Indochinese refugees, especially those in the country less than 5 years, through the following activities: (1) Raise awareness about the health risks associated with carbon monoxide and lead; (2) Identify and assess pollution sources of radon and lead; and Recruit and train environmental and health advocates for the community.

National Indian Justice Center, California
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The National Indian Justice Center proposes to create a model tribal environmental code that takes into account the unique needs of California tribes. The model code will address jurisdictional issues that arise between the State and tribes with respect to enforcement of environmental laws on tribal lands and will include sample protocols and agreements to help resolve some of these issues. In addition, because most California tribes are small and many lack the resources to develop their own codes from scratch, a model tribal environmental code will provide a sample that tribes can tailor to their individual communities. Such codes are essential because they are starting point that tribes need in order to create comprehensive environmental programs. Thus, the model code will enable the EPA to promote tribal management of environmental program on Indian lands in California.

Seaside Church of the Living God
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The Ford Ord Environmental Justice Project will develop educational materials and conduct outreach related to the Ford Ord base closure and clean-up. The project will create an environmental justice handbook and a newsletter specifically for the communities affected by the environmental programs. The second major components of this project will involve coordination with the Army’s environmental staff to help address adverse health impacts affecting the community. The Ford Ord Environmental Justice Network will act as a liaison to helping to facilitate improved community participation and better dialogue with the Army’s Environmental Departments.

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Colorado

Taking Neighborhood Health to Heart
Year: 2017
Toxic Substances

Radon is highly prevalent in Colorado yet many low income and racial/ethnic minorities are unaware of its dangers and have not tested their homes for its presence. The project's principal goals are to raise awareness about radon and the need for home testing in two Denver neighborhoods with large populations of minority and low-income residents. Proposed project activities include: 1) sampling for radon in 100 homes, 2) holding educational workshops about radon and indoor air quality, 3) training and deploying environmental peer advocates to promote and assist with radon testing in East Montclair and Northeast Park Hill, and 4) convening a Northeast Environment and Health Coalition to identify and address other environmental issues in the project neighborhoods.

Conejos Clean Water, Inc. (CCWI)
Year: 2016
Recycling System Development and Solid Waste Removal

CCWI and its partners will address the lack of waste diversion opportunities in the San Luis Valley (SLV) through the development of a plan to design and implement a system for regional recycling that is appropriate and affordable to the six counties and other rural and underserved areas of the San Luis Valley. Due to its remote location, the San Luis Valley is physically isolated from any metropolitan-based recycling hub, contributing to the illegal dumping and waste diversion issues in the area. Lack of access to waste diversion options is linked to several health issues, including pest and rodent infestations, respiratory and other health concerns, and land and water contamination. The planning process involves a series of steps and objectives, including technical analysis; establishing and maintaining input from a Solid Waste Management/Recycling Task Force; conducting waste stream audits and asset mapping; recycling demand projections; capital asset inventories for infrastructure expansion and operational needs; cost estimates for improvements; and a plan document community leaders and stakeholders will want to put in place. Through the development and implementation of this plan, this project aims to reduce residents’ exposures to solid waste in their communities.

Four Corners for Resource Efficiency (4CORE)
Year: 2015
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

4CORE will work to address high-energy costs for low-income residents of La Plata County with the goal of reductions in pollution from nearby coal burning power plants. By encouraging the use of solar panels, 4CORE plans to promote a source of clean energy in this community. Specifically, the applicant proposes to educate low-income residents of La Plata County, CO on solar PVs and provide access to affordable solar PV system installations. The panels will be installed in a cooperative approach amongst community members. The community will benefit by reducing emissions from nearby power plants and from reduced power bills for homeowners through the installation of solar panels. The community will benefit from reduced energy costs for low-income residents and the elimination of the upfront cost burden to solar electricity. 4CORE will be successful through collaborating with partners including the Regional Housing Alliance of La Plata County, La Plata County Habitat for Humanity, and Housing Solutions for the Southwest.

Groundwork Denver
Year: 2015 
Community Resiliency

Groundwork Denver will work to address public health impacts associated with extreme heat events. Groundwork Denver plans to build community capacity to address these issues and provide "co-benefits" for residents. The project will help reduce heat-related public health impacts and build community capacity to address local environmental issues. Groundwork Denver will work collaboratively with partners to address the issue, including Denver Environmental Health (DEH), community residents, and Adams County Sustainability Officer. At least 112 residents will be engaged in data collection, strategy development, piloting and action planning for the project. DEH and Adams County will help obtain data for vulnerability analysis, review and develop strategies to address vulnerabilities and identify ways to integrate strategies into local planning efforts. This project will develop an action plan with residents to address the public health impacts in low-income Denver communities resulting from extreme heat events. Extreme heat events can contribute to a range of health problems and aggravate pre-existing conditions Health impacts of extreme heat events are known to disproportionately impact vulnerable populations such as the elderly, infants and children, and people with chronic medical conditions.

Environmental Learning for Kids (ELK)
Year: 2015
Water Quality

Environmental Learning for Kids seeks to address a lack of knowledge of water quality and environmental justice issues, a shortage of leadership capacity and an absence of community action on water quality and safe drinking water. ELK youth development project seeks to increase the interest in community stewardship, increase academic and career aspirations and increase the science knowledge base and interest and devotion to environmental issues amongst the youth. They will address environmental and public health issues by providing hands-on, outdoor learning labs for youths to explore all aspects of water pollution and contamination and local environmental and public health issues. ELK connects local youth with community partners to strengthen their work. ELK partners include Colorado Parks and Wildlife, US Forest Service, Denver Parks and Recreation, National Park Service and Denver Water. These organizations will share roles of providing natural resource and science professionals to assist in leading projects and trips.

High Country Conservation Center
Year: 2015
Air Quality, Renewables and Energy Efficiency

Making homes safer and more energy efficient reduces the amount of fossil fuels used to heat homes and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. The project seeks to improve indoor air quality and energy efficiency in low-income residences through 25 home audits, five home weatherization projects, and three energy efficiency workshops for homeowners. High Country seeks to educate the community in energy efficient practices/behaviors, and provide workshops in Spanish to resolve language barriers. The community residents will benefit by experiencing more comfortable, safe and energy efficient homes, while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions. High Country will collaborate with The Family Intercultural Resource Center, Summit Combined Housing Authority, and the Northwest Council of Governments.

Conejos Clean Water, Inc.
Year: 2014
Solid Waste, Illegal Dumping, Pollution

Conejos County Clean Water, Inc. and its partners seek to reduce illegal dumping in the San Luis Valley through the creation of a recycling program designed to mitigate the negative health impacts and environmental risks to residents living in the south central Colorado towns of Antonito, La Jara, Manassa, Romeo, Blanca, and San Luis. Through the development of a community action and outreach plan, Conejos will raise community awareness about the hazards of illegal dumping and teach residents proper disposal and recycling methods. The organization will also collaborate with leaders in local government to identify and inventory dumping sites, initiate cleanup efforts, and transport wastes to designated landfills for proper disposal.

Four Corners Office for Resource Efficiency (4CORE)
Year: 2013
Air Quality, Toxic Substances 

“4CORE” will provide education and outreach to the low-income residents of La Plata County, Colorado to address environmental and public health issues associated with poor indoor air quality and home-based health hazards. Area families will benefit from training on how to identify toxins and sources of pollutions, proper use and disposal of household chemicals and pesticides and how to prevent or reduce health risks through low or no cost methods.

Cloud City Conservation Center (C4)
Year: 2013
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

Cloud City Conservation Center seeks to address the disproportionate burden of energy consumption among Hispanic, low-income residents of Lake County, Colorado. Through home energy audits, multi-family building evaluations and a culturally sensitive outreach plan, participants will achieve substantial energy savings in their homes and community and will be empowered to find solutions to environmental challenges posed by old and inadequate housing stock and a severely cold climate.

Citizens for Clean Air in Pueblo
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The PuebloCARES Healthy Homes Initiative (PHHI) will educate community members to reduce exposures to toxic chemicals and indoor air pollutants. This project will provide resources and education to low-income, minority residents in an effort to prevent and help alleviate threats to public health. By introducing a complete Healthy Homes concept through a series of community presentations in the city and county of Pueblo, residents will learn to assess their indoor air quality, analyze health and safety hazards, and report and address exposure to toxic substances. Residents will also be educated on how to prevent health risks through safe and low-cost maintenance and sanitary practices.

Conejos County Clean Water
Year: 2012
Air Quality, Water Quality, Toxic Substances

The project will establish an air monitoring station that will have the ability to collect toxic particulate matter for laboratory analysis. The project will educate and train community members on the air monitoring process and collaborate with partners to analyze the data. This baseline data will be used to enable the community to influence decisions that impact residents’ health and the environment in the future. Conejos County Clean Water also seeks to create a baseline data set for environmental and health data in Conejos County. Environmental data will be collected on the quality of ambient air, water, soil, and health in Conejos County. Health data collected will focus on degenerative diseases such as reproductive cancer and asthma.

Environmental Learning for Kids
Year: 2012
Water Quality, Air Quality

Environmental Learning for Kids will educate youth on local clean water and air impacts through outdoor and nature-based activities. Local youth will participate in activities including outdoor and nature-based education relating to local causes, effects, extent, prevention, reduction, and elimination of water and air pollution. This project also aims to educate the community about environmental justice issues and build consensus through youth-led community forums in low-income and minority communities in metropolitan Denver.

Groundwork Denver, Inc.
Year: 2011
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

Groundwater Denver, Inc. seeks to address air toxics exposure to residents in the Globeville neighborhood. This project will address the presence of air toxics in the north Denver Globeville neighborhood. The recipient and its partners will conduct community-wide surveys and air quality monitoring to determine what toxics are present, educate the Globeville community about air toxics and encourage self-reporting of poor air quality incidences and cross reference industrial emissions information and wind direction data to identify potential sources of the pollution. The collection of scientific data may strengthen citizen’s call to action with the ultimate goal of eliminating the odor and associated air toxics in the neighborhood.

Better Pueblo
Year: 2011
Water Quality

The Better Pueblo Environmental Justice Project sheds light on Fountain Creek water quality issues in Pueblo County. The project seeks to increase awareness of Fountain Creek water quality issues. Fountain Creek has a watershed covering the entire Colorado Springs metropolitan area, which has had over 100 spills and millions of gallons of sewage. The Fountain flows through low income Latino communities throughout the city of Pueblo and flows east through small towns along the Arkansas River. Better Pueblo seeks to change how people in Pueblo County understand environmental and public health matters. The project includes Pueblo East side and the rural areas of Avondale and Boone.

Groundwork Denver, Inc.
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency 

This project addresses the environmental justice issues likely to result from climate change by utilizing mitigation and adaptation strategies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions while also building a “greener” and healthier neighborhood. The project includes a series of activities that will encourage and support residents as they reduce energy use in their homes, clean out toxic substances from their homes, yards and alleys, and participate in the conversion of vacant, underutilized property into a community green space and demonstration of “green infrastructure”. Each activity will address climate change issues while also providing more immediate “co-benefits” to the residents and build a network of interested and active families who will continue to participate in broader climate change initiatives. It is anticipated that the communities will benefit from reduced energy bills and a safer environment, while at the same time greenhouse gases are reduced.

Environmental Learning for Kids
Year: 2010
Air Quality, Water Quality, Community Resiliency

The project seeks to strengthen the capacity of the communities of Park Hill, East Montclair, and Montbello to understand, respond, and prepare for climate change impacts, through one of the greatest assets: youth. Activities will include outdoor and nature-based education on local climate change issues that will directly affect the community, such as reductions in air and water quality, drought, and the public health impacts of increased hot and cold temperature days. The youth will be educated on monitoring and collecting data on local climate change impacts, and develop leadership skills to educate the community on climate change, building consensus, and setting community priorities. Through self-designed community stewardship projects and community education activities, youth become engaged in their neighborhoods while building their community’s capacity to challenge environmental injustice and climate change impacts.

Mountain Studies Institute
Year: 2010
Air Quality, Water Quality, Toxic Substances

The goal of the project is to facilitate the education, empowerment, and participation of rural people in SW Colorado-NW New Mexico that are affected by air, water, and toxics pollution from oil and gas and energy production facilities. This will be accomplished by 1) building community knowledge about ozone, mercury, and other environmental quality issues via regular radio announcements; reader-friendly outreach materials; and air/water quality alerts in newspapers; 2) engaging a broad range of stakeholders via an Air Quality Forum; and 3) empowering and facilitating lower income community participation by making outreach materials related to environmental issues available in Spanish. Success will be measured by: 1) development of a centralized website platform, 2) secure commitment to report air quality conditions on 5 media outlets in the region, 3) development of a Spanish version of the booklet “How’s the Air Out Here?”, 4) dissemination of the booklet to the Hispanic Community, 5) inclusion of the Hispanic Community in discussions on air quality in the Four Corners Region, and 6) hosting a 2010 Air Quality Forum with 75 attendees representing the full diversity of the Four Corners citizenry.

Front Range Earth Force
Year: 2010
Air Quality, Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal

Skinner Middle and elementary school students will utilize the six-step Earth Force Service-Learning Process to investigate the environmental impact practices such as idling automobiles and busses at school entrances; raise awareness about chemical and particulate pollutants and their link to respiratory diseases and eye/nose irritation; and reach across cultural and economic barriers to partner with community stakeholders in order to develop and pilot test multiple strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve solid waste disposal practices, and prevent the triggering of respiratory disease by chemical and particulate pollutants in the air.

Citizens for San Luis Valley Water
Year: 2008/ 2009
Water Quality

Testing unregulated household wells and educating participants about the protection of their health and the need for securing and monitoring their drinking water supply. Test results will provide insight to health care providers, local governments, regulatory agencies, and decision makers and will be centralized in a database. These points will be mapped and provide opportunities for further analysis.

Trees, Water & People
Year: 2008/ 2009
Community Resiliency

Building organizational capacity to identify and understand local environmental justice issues, within the context of environmental statues via formal training and practical experience. Training sessions will build skills that will empower, educate, and provide networking opportunities and technical assistance to 15 Hardrock mining watershed groups that represent about 670,000 citizens. Other skills such as grant writing, board development, and establishing volunteer monitoring programs will also be covered.

Groundwork Denver
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

Empowering low-income Latino immigrant communities to reduce air pollution and properly dispose of household toxic substances. Communities will also be provided with education on mitigating and adapting to the potential impacts of climate change on environmental and public health.

Mountain Studies Institute
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances, Air Quality, Water Quality

Educating communities from Southwest Colorado to Northwest New Mexico about ozone, mercury, and other hazardous substances from oil and gas production facilities that create air and water pollution. The recipient will develop radio announcements and outreach materials, and provide air and water quality alerts in newspapers. Additionally, they will coordinate an Air Quality Forum to engage stakeholders and form an advisory committee to empower and facilitate community participation to reduce community exposure to environmental contaminants

San Luis Valley Ecosystem Council
Year: 2007
Water Quality, Healthy Homes

The identified issue for this project is resident exposure to contaminants (e.g., metals, fertilizers) via household wells. The environmental and/or public health result desired is a reduction in the number of residents within the Valley who are exposed to contaminants through their drinking water source. SLVEC and its partners plan to achieve their 2 desired goal through: (1) educating residents to take personal steps, such as using well water only for bathing or washing, installing or cleaning water filters, to avoid exposure to well water contaminants; (2) educating health care providers so that they will provide services and information to affected residents to reduce exposure and to reduce associated health problems; and (3) promoting and implementing new technologies that are cost effective, which will allow low-income residents to afford filtration systems or to drill for new wells.

The Endocrine Disruption Exchange, Inc.
Year: 2006/ 2007
Air Quality, Water Quality, Toxic Substances

The identified issue is the resident’s exposure to increased levels of air pollution associated with the use and release of many volatile chemicals in rapidly expanding gas fields in an area called the "gas patch". The goal of the project is to empower and educate the individuals and grassroots groups living in the impacted regions to demand full disclosure of all chemicals used and released during drilling, fracturing, completion, and delivery of the gas and a comprehensive water and air monitoring program based on the results of the disclosure. The ultimate goal is to ensure safe water and clean air.

Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC)
Year: 2005
Toxic Substances

NDHC will research and document the presence of lead-based paint hazards in child-accessible public areas of neighborhoods in NE Denver, including alleys, sidewalks, vacant lots, and boundary fences. Once the research and documentation of the problem are complete, the information will be presented to the various stakeholders. NDHC will facilitate the development of an action plan to address the problem. This information will be a catalyst for cleaning up the many suspected lead hazards in child-accessible areas of the environmental justice communities of northeast Denver.

Highland Economic and Community Health Organization (HECHO)
Year: 2004
Community Resiliency

The goal of this project is to bring the perspectives of the youth to community planning and environmental remediation discussions. The youth will be given the tools to research environmental health issues and to influence planning policy decisions that most effect their lives. Specifically, youth in northwest Denver neighborhoods will be trained to research ways in which the multiple environmental risks and hazards affect their health. They will also learn how to identify and overcome the institutional and policy barriers that stand in the way of detecting and solving the environmental health and planning issues with which they are concerned.

Cross Community Coalition/COPEEN
Year: 2003
Air Quality, Community Resiliency

The funds will be used to conduct research on the health effects caused by living close to highways. Research will also be conducted on how other communities are using alternative resources to combat the health effects of living close to heavily polluting freeways. The results of the research will identify environmental and health effects of constructing an elevated toll road that will run directly through neighborhoods that are already bisected by an existing elevated portion of the highway. The toll road is planned to run along I-70 from the I-25 interchange to the Denver International Airport. The research data will facilitate the community’s involvement in the Environmental Impact Study (EIS) process with Colorado Department of Transportation, other decision makers and local political officials.

Resolve, Inc.
Year: 2003
Community Resiliency

The goal of this project is to use a neutral facilitator who will convene the Canon City Collaborative Forum to do an initial situation assessment. In this assessment, the Forum will work to identify issues of concern, deliberate on technical questions and will design a collaborative, consensus-building process through which lasting environmental decisions in Canon City can be made. The formation of this organization, which will collaboratively explore scientific information regarding human and environmental health, would lend to not only shared understanding but would begin to lay down a foundation of trust among the polarized actors in this community.

Rocky Mountain Youth Corps
Year: 2003
Water Quality, Job Training

The central purpose of this project is to do water sampling in the Uinta Wilderness to maintain the continuity and build on the accomplishments of the 2002 EJ small grant project. This funding will: (1) maintain a data collection regime for the revived database on the Ashley National Forest; (2) strengthen a healthy, though fledgling, community-based partnership between the USDA Forest Service, the Northern Ute Fish and Game Department and the Ute Conservation Corp; and (3) provide employment and education opportunities for young adults of the Northern Ute Reservation. This project will provide an affordable workforce to the USFS and provide employment and education opportunities to indigenous youth while promoting land stewardship.

National Wildlife Federation (NWF)
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency

This tribal NEPA training project will establish a working group of Native Americans familiar with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) training needs and challenges for tribes. This involves conducting a NEPA training needs assessment for tribes in identified states and compiling and assessing existing NEPA training materials. Eight to ten key tribal members from Wyoming, Montana, North and South Dakota, representing at least 8 tribes, will attend a 1 ½ day working group session held in Rapid City, South Dakota. This group will develop criteria and actions required for NEPA training, establish criteria and action for assessing existing training materials, and establish roles and responsibilities for working group members. The NWF will work with members to complete a draft training manual based on the findings of the needs assessment.

Valle del Sol Community Center
Year: 2002
Water Quality

This project involves a systematic research project to obtain and assess existing reports and data related to natural resource conditions on the Alamosa River. The main emphasis in this natural resource impact study will be to assess water quality on a watershed basis. The work will entail the following activities: a) perform a literature search of past and present environmental projects and reports concerning the watershed; b) review the report results and monitoring data to assess water quality conditions; c) assess chemicals of concern/CERCLA hazardous substances (metals, sediment and nutrients); d) isolate potential source and impacted areas in the watershed; e) isolate data gaps in understanding water quality/natural resource conditions; f) prioritize potential source areas and issues for restoration mitigation and future monitoring, and, g) develop a summary report and give presentation to the Alamosa River Natural Resource Damage Work Group.

Epimethian Press & Distribution
Year: 2002
Water Quality

This project addresses the environmental impacts of correctional facilities in rural Colorado. Without accurate information about the impact of correctional facilities on a rural town’s infrastructure (e.g. wastewater, drinking water, light pollution, and economy), rural communities cannot make informed decisions about the benefits and/or burdens of allowing such a facility in their town. Experience has shown that without proper planning, correctional facilities can cause wastewater problems, pollute drinking water, create light pollution, and increase automobile traffic. The objective is to collect and analyze technical data on wastewater discharge, groundwater quality, and treatment facility compliance. A key component of this objective is to discuss economic impacts resulting from water pollution, water use, and infrastructure upgrades.

Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC)
Year: 2002
Air Quality

This grant will work to empower and educate the low-income community of Northeast Denver about the environmental justice issue of asthma and other respiratory illnesses. This project will include the development of a resource brochure for ways to improve the indoor environment for asthmatic children, dissemination of information to community via video, interactive displays, and community meetings, and identification of severe cases for further investigation and intervention utilizing leveraged funds from HUD. The project will facilitate partnerships among community leaders, the health and education community, and the affected communities to raise awareness about the effect of the home environment on asthma and to help the affected communities access resources to improve the health of their children.

San Juan Basin Health Department
Year: 2002
Water Quality

This project will educate low-income property owners in the San Juan Basin and the Southern Ute Reservation by assisting them to make informed decisions about the individual sewage system they choose to install and maintain. The purpose of the grant is to design, promote, monitor, evaluate, improve and replicate appropriate sub-surface sewage utilization systems on rural properties presently served by open surface sewage lagoons. An important educational component of this wastewater improvement project includes pollution prevention with emphasis on water conservation, household hazardous waste reduction and groundwater protection. Homeowners will become knowledgeable in how to reduce sewage flows through conservation practices and how to promote adequate transpiration by vegetation.

Colorado Legal Services
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances  

Casillas Pesticide Action Project (CPAP) aims to decrease farm workers’ exposure to toxic pesticides in Colorado. CPAP will provide farm workers with the information and tools necessary to protect themselves from pesticide poisoning by involving farm workers in its educational outreach through a train-the-trainer project. The project will increase farm workers’ awareness of pesticides and safety, and involvement with environmental justice issues within their own community. Secondly, CPAP will invite farm workers and other interested community members to communicate and strategize about the best ways to address the identified EJ issues.

New Farms
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

This project will develop community involvement aimed at working with the Army and associated agencies to prevent and address problems at the Pueblo Chemical Depot. Seven to nine local agricultural producers, two scientists, and at least one advocate for the migrant farm workers will form a functional working group to address agricultural issues related to Pueblo Chemical Depot. This group will appoint a representative to work closely with the Army and its contractors to develop an adequate baseline study and analyze any studies and results. The project goal is to protect the physical health and reputation of the area for agricultural producers and workers.

Environmental Learning for Kids
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency, Job Training

Environmental Learning for Kids will recruit 15 young people residing in a low-income neighborhood in Denver for the Youth Mentor Corps. Supervised and trained by a Colorado Division of Wildlife Biologist, they will participate in environmental justice issues in educational workshops, host workshops for small business owners, create and disseminate bilingual fact sheets on EJ issues and pollution prevention, and publish a quarterly newsletter and educational articles for local newspapers on environmental issues.

The Ute Conservation Corps
Year: 2001
Water Quality, Air Quality, Job Training

The Ute Conservation Corps proposes to employ young adults from the Northern Ute Tribe to conduct water quality testing and lakeside rehabilitation in the Flattops Wilderness and water-quality testing in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness. Curricula built around the Clean Water and Air Acts will be implemented and accredited through the Colorado Mountain College. By doing so we provide an affordable workforce to the US Forest Service and provide employment and education opportunities to indigenous youth while promoting land stewardship.

Cross Community Coalition
Year: 2000
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

Cross Community Coalition will base this grant’s work in the communities of Southern Colorado, including the San Luis Valley, focusing on mining issues. The project has the following components: 1) collaborate with existing organizations to host a stakeholders’ education workshop including information-sharing by representatives of the mining industry, community groups, and government agencies; 2) research environmental justice issues related to irresponsible mining activities and the impacts of cyanide, acid mine drainage, and other chemicals on the environment; 3) identify ways to involve youth in the education process; 3) work with grassroots organizations to plan and implement a training program for themselves and other individuals; and 4) involve both the targeted communities and statewide EJ communities by sending them copies of the quarterly newsletter.

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Connecticut

New Haven Urban Resources Initiative
Year: 2017
Air Quality, Water Quality

New Haven Urban Resources Initiative’s GreenSkills program will address local air and water quality issues in New Haven through an integrated strategy of maintaining bioswales, planting street trees, and stewarding community parks; while also providing green job training for approximately 38 local residents. Bioswales are landscape designs that remove silt and pollution from surface water runoff, and tree plantings will be targeted for low tree canopy areas in underserved neighborhoods. The New Haven area suffers from both water and air pollution due to combined sewer overflows and high levels of particulate matter in the air. Proposed project activities include: 1) planting 500 street trees, 2) engaging 300 local residents as tree stewards, and 3) maintaining 20 bioswales.

New Haven Ecology Project, Inc. dba Common Ground (CG)
Year: 2015
Water Quality, Air Quality, Job Training

CG and its partners (the CT Fund for the Environment and the Urban Resources Initiative) plan to engage over 30 youth in at least 35 job opportunities to: Improve access to clean water by identifying threats to water quality, engaging and educating residents about these threats, and taking direct action to improve clean water access along New Haven’s West River. Corps members will support efforts of the CT Fund for the Environment and the West River Watershed Coalition to develop and implement a watershed based plan by, among other things, (1) conducting and sharing results of citizen surveys of major tributaries, (2) developing a web-based platform to share information and engage community, (3) planning and leading watershed stewardship activities, and (4) educating peers and adults. CG and its partners also plan to Improve air quality, water quality, and access to other critical ecosystem services in urban low-income communities of color by addressing disproportionate access to urban street trees, community greenspaces, and green infrastructure. Corps members will work with the Urban Resources Initiative to (1) conduct outreach to neighborhoods disproportionately affected by poor air quality and low tree cover, (2) plant urban street trees in these neighborhoods, (3) work side-by-side with grassroots greenspace groups to increase vegetative cover and improve health, and (4) install and steward green approaches to storm-water management.

New Haven Ecology Project
Year: 2013
Air Quality, Water Quality

Through its Green Jobs Corps, New Haven Ecology Project seeks to engage area high school students in learning how to improve air quality, water quality, and access to other critical ecosystem services in low-income communities of color in New Haven Connecticut. They will learn how to contribute to environmental health solutions by improving green spaces, identifying sources of water pollution, and implementing strategies to address sources of pollution.

Solar Youth, Inc.
Year: 2013
Solid Waste Disposal

The project will educate and teach residents, in the public housing development adjacent to the Pond Lily Nature Reserve, to lead cleanup efforts and anti-litter campaigns that will help create a safe and sustainable green space for the community. Solar Youth will work to minimize the negative health effects of exposure to harmful solid waste in the Pond Lily Nature Reserve.

Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice (CCEJ)
Year: 2011
Solid Waste Disposal, Air Quality

The Asylum Hill Recycles project decreases emissions by increasing community recycling efforts. Hartford residents suffer an asthma rate more than twice the national average. Hartford is home to the nation’s fifth largest trash to energy incinerator. The facility accepts trash from 70 towns throughout the state. Emissions by the Hartford incinerator have been associated with incidences of asthma, cancer, endometriosis, and diabetes. CCEJ will start a new project focusing on Asylum Hill in order to achieve a bigger and broader increase in recycling among its residents and businesses. The project hopes to motivate small business owners and landlords to increase recycling rates by explaining how the practice reduces trash removal costs.

Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice
Year: 2010
Solid Waste Disposal

The “Hartford Recycles” project will train eight housing authority residents to be part of a Recycling Speakers Bureau. The Bureau's goal is to educate 900 Hartford residents in multifamily housing on how to recycle. Hartford Recycles will work to implement recycling programs at five housing authority buildings and will educate 10-12 landlords and small businesses about the economic benefits of recycling as oppose to higher trash removal costs. CCEJ's efforts to increase recycling will help reduce the amount of trash burned at the city's waste-to-energy incinerator and reduce greenhouse gas production.

Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice
Year: 2009/ 2008
Air Quality

Reducing the negative health effects from air toxics in Hartford, New Haven and Bridgeport, Connecticut. It will provide education, outreach and capacity building for urban residents to reduce exposure to toxic cleaning products and encourage use of safer, less toxic alternatives to reduce environmental and public health problems in indoor environments.

New Haven Ecology Project, Inc. (NHEP)
Year: 2005
Air Quality, Water Quality

NHEP will: 1) engage and educate urban high school students about the science and social science of local environmental justice issues related to air and water quality through the investigation of local issues and presentations to community groups, officials and area schools; 2) generate data and disseminate findings on air and water quality in the New Haven community, thereby informing residents and expanding the body of data previously collected on local air and water quality; and 3) create a replicable model of community-based participatory research on local environmental justice concerns to be disseminated to area schools. NHEP is physically located in the West Rock neighborhood, one of the six New Haven neighborhoods considered severely distressed and in need of revitalization. Partners include the New Haven City Plan Department, Environmental Northeast, Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice, Environmental Council for the City of New Haven, Yale School of Nursing, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven Health Department, Quinnipiac River Watershed Partnership, the Quinnipiac River Watershed Association, and the New Haven Sierra Club.

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Delaware

Clean Air Council
Year: 2012
Air Quality

The goal of this project is to examine Wilmington, Delaware City Ordinance 02-116 which is intended to prevent or limit fugitive dust. The project also seeks to ensure the ordinance is effectively implemented and enforced in the community where residents are burdened by a number of air pollution sources including industrial, manufacturing, and transportation sources. The Clean Air Council will conduct interviews with local government officials in an effort to understand the background behind the current ordinance and how it has been implemented. The Council will also conduct interviews with members of the South Wilmington community to learn about ways in which the law could be implemented more effectively.

Southeast Rural Community Assistance Project (RCAP)
Year: 2012
Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality

Southeast Rural Community Assistance Project (RCAP) RCAP seeks to create a sustainable system of solid waste management and removal in ten rural, low-income Delaware communities. This project will address the environmental, public health and financial burdens of each community and provide assistance in properly maintaining wastewater treatment systems. The project will ensure functional sustainability of the wastewater treatment systems, compliance with local and federal regulations and explore ways to address health hazards due to improperly treated wastewater.

Eastside/Southbridge Community Development Corporation
Year: 2000
Toxic Substances

The community center plans to conduct workshops and involve affected communities to educate them and to gain their input in Public Health and Environmental Justice issues facing the city of Delaware. With the cooperation of the University of Delaware, a graduate intern will coordinate workshops that focus on the following topics: 1) hazardous substances, 2) city, state and federal land use, and 3) environmental interactions. In addition, a quarterly newsletter will be produced and distributed throughout the community to increase the effectiveness of the outreach aspect program and further educate the residents of the community.

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District of Columbia

Living Classrooms of the National Capital Region
Year: 2011
Water Quality

The District Schoolyard Stewards program educates Washington DC area students about the causes, effects and prevention of water pollution. This project will address the Clean Water Act, Section 104(b) (3) through education and projects designed to address the causes, effects, prevention, reduction, and elimination of water pollution. This program will provide a project and investigation based learning experience for 5th grade students from underserved areas in Washington DC.

Green DMV, Inc.
Year: 2011
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

Green DMV partners with faith-based organizations to bring energy efficiency education to impoverished DC neighborhoods. By working with the faith-based organizations in DC’s most impoverished neighborhoods, Green DMV aims to reduce overhead costs and greenhouse gas emissions associated with energy use local facilities. The project will educate affected communities about the role of energy efficiency in saving money while protecting the environment in which they live.

Earth Conservation Corps
Year: 2010
Community Resiliency

Through environmental education, this Earth Conservation Corps project will empower youth and young adults to improve their knowledge of environmental hazards and pollution prevention. Additional education will take place in school and volunteer session settings.

Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington, Spanish Catholic Center
Year: 2010
Air Quality, Water Quality, Toxic Substances

This project will provide environmental education to low income DC metropolitan area residents in order to help them reduce their potential risks from air pollution and lead exposure.

Coalition for Environmentally Safe Communities
Year: 2007
Healthy Homes

The identified issue for this project is resident exposure to household hazards, namely asthma triggers and lead. The environmental result desired is a reduction in exposure to such hazards. CESC plan to achieve their desired goal by: (1) creating sustainable, ongoing resources and technical assistance to DC organizations and agencies to improve their ability to respond to environmental health threats; and (2) providing training to staff and volunteers to identify procedures for informing residents of environmental hazards affecting them.

American Lung Association of DC (ALADC)
Year: 2002
Air Quality, Community Resiliency

The American Lung assoc. wants to educate the targeted audience of the low-income and minority population in the Congress Heights Neighborhood in Washington, D.C. of the health concerns of indoor air quality. The goals of this project are; 1) to identify and bring together stakeholders the targeted community, 2) to help reduce the burden of asthma in the targeted audience by raising their awareness of indoor air quality and reducing indoor air pollutants. The major plan for this project is having two workshops, given at different dates, that will educate 30 low-income individuals or families on how to assess their home for indoor pollutants. The outcome of the ALADC proposal will be evaluated by giving the participants two surveys on the topic of indoor air quality. One will be given at the beginning of the workshops and the other will be three months after them to see if the knowledge given has been retained and changed their level of awareness.

Washington Very Special Arts (WVSA)
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

WVSA connection serves Washington, D.C. area as an arts-in-education organization providing educational arts programs to children and youth with special needs. Childhood lead poisoning continues to be a problem in Washington, D.C. and WVSA plans to provide an arts-based approach to educate the public in childhood lead poisoning prevention. Inner city youth, ages 1425 will develop colorful posters with easy to read and act upon lead poisoning prevention messages. The posters will be placed in up to 50 D.C. healthcare facilities and WVSA arts connection’s Website with links to relevant sites.

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Florida

The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Boca Raton
Year: 2015
Community Resiliency, Water Quality, Air Quality

This pilot project will create a Resilience Adaptation Community Toolkit (ReACT), for use in community-led neighborhood canvassing. In addition, the tool will be used at community meetings to provide education and training to reduce public health risks associated with increasingly severe storms and sea level rise in South Delray Beach and the Pearl City area of Boca Raton. This project seeks to address respiratory illness, water contamination, injury, and environmental contamination due to strong storms and sea level rise.

Dream in Green, Inc.
Year: 2015
Solid Waste Disposal, Renewables and Energy Efficiency

This project proposes to explore the influence the GSC program has on school staff and students' understanding of and response to the effects of environmental stressors. Specifically, the program focuses on creating resource-efficient behaviors; increasing understanding of environmental challenges; and empowering staff and students to take action to reduce their carbon footprint, implement recycling programs, and make “green” choices related to transportation and in work/school life.

Farmworker Association of Florida, Inc.
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

The Farmworker Association of Florida seeks to find a resolution to the under-reporting of pesticide related illnesses and lack of health education for area farmworkers. The organization will fund a special initiative of its Pesticide Safety and Environmental Health (PSEH) project. The work of this initiative, which involves monitoring working conditions and education on toxic substances, aligns with the Toxic Substances Control Act and Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. Through the PSEH project, the Farmworker Association will help to reduce pesticide exposure, improve the health of farmworkers and train healthcare providers to address health issues that stem from pesticide exposure.

Museum of Science, Inc.
Year: 2012
Farming and Fishing

The Museum of Science will support a Hydroponic Urban Garden (HUG) Project designed to raise awareness regarding healthy eating in Miami’s ethnically-diverse Coconut Grove/Coral Way community. The HUG Project will highlight the broad environmental benefits of urban hydroponic systems as well as the nutritional benefits derived from incorporating more fresh produce into urban diets. The Museum of Science will develop a field trip curriculum focused on a hands-on learning approach. By establishing hydroponic gardens at five local elementary schools, the HUG Project will educate young people, area schools and families about viable alternatives to the potentially-harmful fertilizers and pesticides used in modern industrial agriculture.

Institute for Community Collaboration
Year: 2011
Farming and Fishing, Job Training

Florida youth take on “Urban Food Deserts” - Youth L.E.A.D. (YL) seeks to empower and engage underserved teens from low-income neighborhoods as environmental and “food justice” advocates. The program identifies urban food deserts and encourages local residents to advocate for and utilize local food resources, such as farmers markets and community gardens. The program seeks to increase access to healthy foods and green spaces in affected neighborhoods. Youth who complete the 12-week afterschool training will implement a service learning project in their schools or community in an effort to create and maintain local, healthy food resources. The curriculum will address health disparities while motivating teens to adopt healthier lifestyles and environmentally sustainable behaviors. The service learning component can include: community outreach and peer education; apprenticeships at farmers’ markets; development and/or maintenance of organic community gardens; and conducting food demonstrations that utilize plant-based, local foods.

Suwanee River Area Health Education Center
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances

Suwanee River Area Health Education Center educates residents in contaminated Gainesville neighborhoods. This project is multi-faceted assisting 300 low-income residents in Gainesville, Florida address neighborhood contamination of elevated levels of dioxin and arsenic. The goals of this project are to address the need for scientifically-accurate, comprehensible public education and create ways to reduce and eliminate contact with potentially hazardous chemicals in the environment.

Protect Gainesville Citizens
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances

Protect Gainesville Citizens launches Healthy Homes Initiative for Florida residents. This project will research exposures to contaminated house dust and explore methods to reduce its impact on public health. Information gathered during this study will be available to stakeholders and provide opportunities for partners to communicate findings to the public. The project will focus specifically on dioxins and brominated flame retardants (dioxin-like chemicals) found in furniture, carpeting, and electronics.

Charlotte County Board of Commissioners
Year: 2010
Water Quality, Community Resiliency

This project will facilitate a discussion with the community and the local government to cooperatively restore an urban wetland and create a multifaceted “environmental park” as one of the last underdeveloped parcels in Port Charlotte. The project will educate the affected community about diminishing wetlands in Charlotte County’s urbanized areas as well as address the problems of impaired surface water and groundwater. There are four components to this project. They are 1) Identifying the topographic and boundary project areas, 2) water quality testing, 3) conduct three charettes to gather public input and, 4) create an urban wetland concept plan. The objectives of the project to be funded by this grant will be 1) identify all potential partners, 2) introduce neighborhoods to the concept of restoring the wetland and its role as an ecological form of infrastructure that can help treat storm water runoff, 3) document perceived and real threats associated with the project, 4) identify hazards and unmet needs that could be satisfied by the project, 5) identify essential passive park elements and, 6) the creation of a managing entity to oversee the park maintenance and make recommendation for its protection and improvements.

City of Jacksonville Housing and Neighborhood Department
Year: 2008/ 2009
Community Resiliency

Conducting focus groups to identify and prioritize environmental health concerns of the residents in “health zone 1” of the Jacksonville Urban Core. These focus groups will be held in collaboration with the Duval County Health Department, Division of Environmental Health and Safety and Disease Control and Healthy Jacksonville. The goal is to improve the health of Duval County residents through progressive health promotion, disease prevention and treatment efforts. The project will also focus on reducing environmental risks inside of the home by offering healthy assessments, and educating residents on environmental hazards.

Farmworker Association of Florida, Inc.
Year: 2006/ 2007
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The project will reduce the farmworkers’ exposure to the pesticides applied to fern fields. The project will accomplish this goal by conducting air monitoring tests to determine the presence, levels and nature of, and distance from application sites of pesticides applied in the fern fields. The results, with an analysis, will be shared with the community through community meetings. The importance of the use of hand washing stations at work sites will be shared with the farmworker community, as well as with fern grower associations and health care providers in the area. Likewise, the past results of work place assessments, or diagnostic's, will be shared with the community to alert them to the incidence of violations of Worker Protection Standards and Field Sanitation Laws. On-going pesticide safety and environmental health training and the newly implemented health care provider training are opportunities for continuing to learn and share information with community members.

The Farmworker Association of Florida, Inc.
Year: 2004
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

This Lake Apopka Project is to complete 100 community health surveys and address health problems and accessibility of quality health care of farm workers. The Lake Apopka Project is two-fold: one is to empower and organize African-American, Latino, and Haitian Lake Apopka farm workers’ families who are experiencing significant life-threatening health problems connected to their exposure to multiple sources of environmental contamination such as direct pesticide spray, pesticide drifts into the fields, labor camps, and residential areas and the second is to research and document the health problems of the Lake Apopka farm workers community and raise consciousness about farm workers health problems and appeal for further farmworkers health research, and advocate for improved health care for farm workers. The Lake Apopka Project will benefit the Lake Apopka farm workers’ community by enabling them to take an active role in addressing the issues that affect their lives and health. his project aims to make important connections among multiple sources of environmental contamination, pesticide exposure, wildlife studies, and farm workers health.

Environmental Conservation, Inc.
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal

The program will inform and educate the Belle Glades community about household hazardous waste. The residents will be educated about how to identify, store, reduce, recycle and dispose of hazardous waste properly. The program will engage students from the 7th and 8th grades by conducting hazardous waste surveys in their homes. A one-day community household hazardous waste collection event and an environmental justice summer camp will be organized as part of this project.

Duval County Health Department
Year: 2002
Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances, Water Quality  

This project will develop an Environmental Toxicology program and assist in establishing a Citizen’s Health Advisory Committee (CHAC) whose mission is to inform the community about environmental hazards, listen to their responses and participate in developing solutions. The project will: (1) Conduct a community assessment to identify potential cancer cases around the Morse Avenue Dump Site and Aslan-Willis Landfills. (2) Employ community leadership to differentiate potential health problems which may be associated with environmental contamination. (3) Inform the public on hazardous waste materials, and the health effects of environmental toxins and the usage of contaminated private water wells.

Duval County Health Department
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency, Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing, Water Quality

With this grant the Duval County Health Department (DCHD) will focus on the Jacksonville Ash Site, Forest Street Incinerator Site, Cleveland Incinerator Site, and Lonnie Miller Park Site which are identified as potentially hazardous. The primary goal of this project is to determine the minority and/or low-income populations risk of adverse health effects from environmental hazards. With the incorporation of direct and indirect methodologies the DCHD will assess the impact and incidence of environmental hazards in the community, investigate the prevalence of cancer, compile data on the health status of individuals living on or near hazardous waste sites, and provide research data gaps on fish consumption and water quality measurements.

United Hispanics Union
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

This project will address the lack of awareness and educational information on lead-based paint, safe drinking water, toxic waste disposal, clean air, and other chemicals in the Hispanics and African Americans’ communities in Miami-Dade County. The project will: (1) Educate, organize, and prepare the community in the prevention of toxic hazards. (2) Conduct a study of environmental hazards in the community. (3) Outreach to the landlords in hopes they will comply with the standards of housing regulations on lead contamination. (4) Assemble service providers to conduct blood screening for lead on children.

Legal Services of North Florida
Year: 2002
Water Quality, Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

This project will be a part of a community education practice. This project will identify contaminants in drinking water, as well as in soil and/or housing conditions. The project proposes to assist the community in determining sources of lead contamination and understanding its cause. The project will identify the risks, identify disproportionate contaminant situations, and ensure community residents have both the technical and communication skills to address and resolve these issues.

Bethune Village Community Center
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

The project will research and evaluate the existence of lead in the environment of the Bethune Village community. The operation of the project will occur in a series of tasks as follows: (1) perform an evaluation of the potential occurrence of lead in the homes and yards of the residents; (2) take lead samples at six locations and perform analysis; (3) conduct community meetings on results of samples, findings, present reports and plans for future operations.

Le’Azon Technology Institute
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

The “Access to Information” project will provide North Greenwood residents with tools to understand environmental and health impacts of brownfields on their daily lives. The tools are: (1) develop a brownfields web site with Internet connections which will present difference perspectives on the environment, community and public health; (2) provide computers in three locations that will be accessible to the community; (3) create a tradition and electronic newsletter to get the information to the public; (4) coordinate with the City of Clearwater to sponsor workshops to inform and market the web site, newsletters and provide information on the brownfields community; (5) visit cities and towns with communities similar to North Greenwood to observe and learn about the methods they used to address environmental justice in their neighborhoods.

Smith-Williams Service Center Foundation
Year: 2001
Solid Waste Disposal

The project is to develop an environmental education/awareness program in the Bond Community Environmental Partnership. The project will focus on human health risks, trash/illegal dumping and solid waste disposal. The project proposes to: (1) promote/ encourage the community’s capacity to address its own environmental concerns through education and training; (2) develop a quarterly newsletter; (3) develop a strong network in the community by building good working relationships with participating governments and (4) serve as a pilot program for the development of a citywide illegal dumping task force.

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Georgia

Athens Land Trust (ALT)
Year: 2018
Air and Water Monitoring Project with Green Infrastructure and Youth Development

Athens Land Trust seeks to monitor the disproportionate air and water quality hazards experience by two historically African American neighborhoods of West Broad and East Athens and inform residents about the severity of those hazards and steps they can take to better protect themselves and their families from those environmental impacts.  ALT will hire three Young Urban Farmers (YUF) each summer of the project period to perform water and air quality monitoring at West Broad School and present their results at public education opportunities, including community garden network events, the West Broad Farmers Market, and community-wide symposia.  Additionally, ALT will hire a part-time Community Garden Network (CGN) Coordinator to oversee monitoring and research activities, promote public environmental education in the West Broad neighborhood, and support environmental health through community gardening.  Finally, ALT will host monthly workshops on environmental and agricultural topics and install rain barrels at all gardens in the CGN.  This project will result in the following outputs: 240 residents will be educated on environmental justice issues related to water, air, and agriculture; twelve individuals will be trained in community gardening operations and EJ issues; and scientific findings on air and water quality in the West Broad neighborhood will be disseminated to 400 residents.

Cook County Family Connection, Inc.
Year: 2017
Water Quality; Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act

Project Description: Cook County Family Connection (CCFC) will train, educate, and promote the significance of water conservation and organic gardening through this project. Cook County is a small, rural community that has very few local food options resulting in many residents depending on canned and boxed foods purchased at convenience stores and gas stations. CCFC is proposing addressing this limited food access through pesticide-free community gardens and water conservation. The collaborative will convene monthly (12) leadership meetings, facilitate monthly (12) community workshops on gardening and water conservation practices, and will create a multimedia marketing campaign to continually educate and inform the community.

Trees Atlanta, Inc.
Year: 2017
Air Quality, Water Quality

The Youth Tree Team (YTT) internship program is an environmental job training program focused on increasing Atlanta’s greenspace and tree canopy, which can have a positive effect on air quality and mitigate water pollution. The YTT program will target the Atlanta Beltline Westside Trail area providing (1) urban forest protection and restoration, (2) environmental job training, education, and career development for 20 local high school students, and (3) community education about local environmental issues and the benefits of the urban forest. This proposal will help fund implementation of the first official year of the YTT program, in which local high school students work to restore and protect the urban forest while receiving environmental job skills training and education about local environmental issues and the benefits of plants and trees, particularly in the Westside Trail area's primarily low-income and minority neighborhoods.

Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, Inc.
Year: 2017
Water Quality

"Neighborhood Water Watch” is a one-year effort aimed at engaging and educating people in historically low-income and minority communities in West Atlanta to improve water quality and decrease public health risks. Working with partners, Chattahoochee Riverkeeper (CRK) will address water quality concerns through data collection and by involving participants in education initiatives. Proposed project activities include: 1) Volunteer Led Weekly Water Sampling, 2) a One Day Mass-Sampling Community Event, and 3) a Community Focused Water Quality Forum. The proposed target goals are to have up to 600 water samples analyzed and 100 community residents engaged with the program.

Athens Lands Trust
Year: 2013
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The West Broad Market Garden Project will use educational programs to help residents of Hancock Corridor reduce their consumption of foods grown with pesticides and decrease the amount of food waste going into landfills. Athens Lands Trust seeks also to educate area low-income gardeners about how to grow food, conserve water, and manage pests in ways that are affordable and healthy for the environment. The neighborhood will benefit from organic food production, community gardening and composting, youth development, and community empowerment. Through the creation of the West Broad Market Garden, an educational hub where organic food is grown and distributed, neighborhood residents will learn about the benefits of pesticide-free foods and gain access to affordable, healthy produce.

Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League (BREDL)
Year: 2011
Air Quality, Water Quality

Citizens in Burke County, GA advance Environmental Justice Initiatives. The project will empower Burke County citizens by increasing their involvement in creating solutions for environmental and public health issues in the community. The project seeks to reduce the disproportionate impacts of radioactive air and water pollution to residents in the vicinity of the Plant Vogtle commercial nuclear power plant and the U.S. Dept of Energy’s Savannah River Site. The project encourages low-income minority residents living near these sources to become involved in scientific investigations and the reporting of negative impacts to the air and water.

Southface Energy Institute
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

This project addresses the lack of green building education for residents of affordable housing. The disadvantaged youth living in the CHRIS Kids Apartments and residents of affordable housing units in the Southeast will be educated through a short green building video and a green tour discussing techniques used in green building. The focus of the video will be on the importance of techniques used in apartments and other green affordable housing projects that promote energy inefficiency, water efficiency, resource efficiency, indoor air quality, and other advanced techniques. The tour will focus specifically on the following categories: energy efficiency, water efficiency, site planning, indoor air quality, resource efficiency, and advanced techniques (such as recycling and the utilization of alternate modes of transportation). The green tour and video developed for the CHRIS kids Apartments will be made available online through the Earth Craft and Southface website and marketed to green affordable housing developers and state agencies throughout the Southeast, providing valuable education to low-income residents.

Haarambe House/Citizens for Environmental Justice
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances

This project will engage adults and youth residents in community based participatory research and community education activities that help residents understand and address the impacts of environmental toxins in Chatham County. Specifically, Harambee House/Citizens For Environmental Justice will work with an accredited training provider to train 10 adult residents on the new renovation, repair, and painting (RRP) rule that address environmental hazards in residential units and research the impacts of lead poisoning. In addition, the project will work with the nationally renowned youth organization “Intelligent Seedz” to train 12 youth to research and document (through a video) the impacts of environmental toxins in communities.

Hyde & Aragon Park Improvement Committee, Inc.
Year: 2006/ 2007
Water Quality, Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

Hyde & Aragon Park Improvement Committee, Inc. (HAPIC) will create a one-hour documentary and host a town hall forum on environmental issues that the Hyde Park community has faced and continues to face. The objective of this project is to inform, educate and empower the community on the environmental issues such as water quality, outdoor air quality, solid waste and environmental justice that confront Hyde Park. The documentary will include a complete description of the numerous environmental and public health issues in Hyde Park, and some potential remedies to resolve the environmental issues and the available resources from local, state and federal governments and the private sector to resolve environmental and health issues. There will be town hall meeting in which community residents can have a meaningful dialogue with the local government officials responsible eliminating environmental contamination in Hyde Park.

Peachtree Woodall Whetstone Watershed Alliance
Year: 2005
Air Quality

The Alliance project will address the accelerating loss of tree canopy, stream buffers and other green spaces in the predominately African American and poor communities of northwest Atlanta, and the disparity of negative environmental consequences. The Alliance will also address the dramatic increase in asthma and other respiratory illnesses among the population that has been linked to the rapid destruction of the tree canopy. Partners include the Arborist Department and the Soil and Erosion Control Department of the City of Atlanta.

West Atlanta Watershed Alliance, Inc. (WAWA)
Year: 2005
Community Resiliency

WAWA will: (1) engage residents in identifying, researching and documenting the existence and extent of environmental and public health hazards that exist in the community and (2) facilitate information exchange and cooperation between communities, governmental agencies, environmental organizations, health care providers and academic institutions. Residents will be actively involved in the problem identification, data collection, and mapping of environmental stressors. As a result, the community will increase the level of their awareness and knowledge of the environmental and public health hazards. In addition, community residents will develop the skills needed to engage responsible parties in dialogue to help solve local environmental problems. Partners include local government Agencies, academic institutions and civic and neighborhood clubs.

Glynn Environmental Coalition
Year: 2003
Farming and Fishing, Water Quality

The purpose of this project is to educate at-risk anglers in Brunswick, Georgia and Glynn County area to reduce human risks associated with the habitual consumption of contaminated seafood. The estuary surrounding the Brunswick Georgia peninsula has been extensively contaminated. This project is a partnership between the Glynn Environmental Coalition, the Glynn County Health Department, and the Coastal Resources Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. The need to improve information dissemination about potential health risks associated with the consumption of contaminated seafood by at-risk fishermen, their families and friends were identified by the project partners. Previous studies and education efforts have generally targeted those that recreational fishermen by boat in the area.

Woolfolk Citizens Response Group
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency

Workshop Development and Implementation Project: This project will address environmental inequity in a manner designed to organize, assist, empower and support low income citizens and People of Color communities to improve their quality of living by designing, planning and hosting a series of Environmental Justice training and educational workshops. The project will: (1) Educate its citizens on Superfund through workshops and other training. (2) Identify and facilitate needed improvements in communications among all stakeholders. (3) Facilitate information exchange. (4) Create partnerships to address disproportionate, high, and adverse environmental exposure.

Harambee House, Inc.
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

Academic Institutions, Agencies, Communities Network Project: This project is a collaborative research effort that will lead to the development of a strategic community capacity-building model for environmental justice communities regarding the assessment and remediation of threats to human health and the environment from the release of hazardous substances. The project will: (1) Conduct research to develop a model to enhance citizens’ participation in a superfund related decision making. (2) Collect and analyze data. (3) Identify existing and relevant federal partnerships and research the barriers to effective interagency coordination. (4) Arrange a research colloquium to identify environmental resources that will support ACA-Net. (5) Research the effectiveness of computer technologies in networks involving communities of people of color, HBCUs and government agencies. (6) Publish a final project report.

National Wildlife Federation
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

To address community-identified health and environmental issues, the project proposes to develop and implement six workshop series for adults. These Community Watershed Action Workshops with the theme “Pollution Prevention is Health Promotion” will teach about environmental health, produce six environmental health newsletters, hold three Environmental Health Mini-Fairs, and a one-day long Community Environmental Health Fair.

Southwest Economic Development Corporation
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The Project will provide interactive community based environmental education programs. The programs include the following objectives: 1) disseminate environmental justice information to facilitate communication, 2) prepare participants for environmental stewardship by educating and training community leaders to increase their knowledge, skill, and ability to effectively address environmental justice issues, and 3) improve environmental performance by aligning human activities with natural cycles of the earth, providing project-based ecosystem management learning modules incorporated in a project-based service learning mode. The Environmental Justice Outreach and Leadership Conference will also provide a mechanism for affected stakeholders to form community partnerships among stakeholders to address environmental issues.

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Hawaii

Kaua'i Environmental Health Network
Year: 2017
Pesticide Education, Water Quality

The Kānāwai Community Engagement Project will provide opportunities for west Kaua’i residents to learn about and protect against impacts to water quality and public health due to toxic pesticide use by large agricultural companies working in the local area. The project will educate community members on the CWA, FIFRA, and local watersheds through exchanges with local water experts, Hawaiian cultural practitioners, policymakers and state agency conservationists. Project activities include: 1) Engaging at least 150 residents through a Neighborhood Door-to-Door Education effort 2) Conducting walking tours and trainings, and 3) Developing a First Draft of a Community Collaboration Plan of Action.

Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services
Year: 2011
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

Kokua Kaliha Valley Comprehensive Family Services and partners will address public health issues within the Kuhio Park Terrace public housing community. Kokua Kaliha Valley Comprehensive Family Services and its partners will conduct a community-wide campaign to mitigate the causes of indoor air pollution, reduce exposure to toxic cleaning chemicals, and address public health issues resulting from poor sanitation within the Kuhio Park terrace public housing community. Run by multilingual, multicultural staff, this project will empower the predominantly Pacific Islander community of Kuhio Park Terrace by providing resident with necessary information and tools to take ownership of their physical surroundings and thereby improve the health of their families and community.

Malama Learning Center
Year: 2010
Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality, Job Training

The Malama Learning Center is a non-profit organization that brings art, science, conservation and culture together through education to promote sustainable living on the Hawaiian Islands. Malama Learning Center, in partnership with Leeward Community College will create a “Green Collar Institute” to bring awareness to high school and college students of the environmental and climate change issues affecting their communities. The Leeward Coast of O’ahu is home to the largest percentage of native Hawaiians on the Island, many of who are living at or below poverty level and face numerous environmental issues including overflowing landfills, illegal dumping and pollution. The Green Collar Institute will work to reduce the frequency and size of illegal dumps, improve water quality in streams, harbors and oceans, and improve native ecosystems. Students will receive information about related green collar jobs and learn practices in sustainability.

Pacific Basin Development Council
Year: 2003
Community Resiliency

The project will build capacity to identify environmental issues and to actively involve the Island communities in design and implementation of remediation, mitigation, and prevention activities. A handbook on the suggested processes and alternative strategies to encourage community participation will be developed for senior policy officials.

University of Hawaii at Manoa
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances, Water Quality

The purpose of this project addresses the need for on-site pesticide risk reduction training and continuing education for two groups of “at risk” farmers in Hawaii: Farmers who lack experience in production agriculture and farmers with minimal English proficiency. Pesticide misuse could also put farm workers, their families and communities at risk from accidental exposure or from lack of knowledge regarding proper use and safety. The College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources’ Pesticide Risk Reduction Education Program (PRREP), in collaboration with Crop Care Hawaii and LLC (a private agriculture consulting company), initiated a pest and pesticide management program in January 2001 for new and non-English proficient farmers. Training emphasizes integrated pest management concepts and practices. Training materials have been translated into Tagalog and Laotian. The purpose of the grant is to provide additional resources to meet the needs of this population before they inadvertently contaminate their groundwater, themselves, their families, other workers, or agricultural commodities.

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Idaho

Nez Perce Tribe
Year: 2010
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The Nez Perce Tribe Water Resources Division will conduct pre and post surveys regarding the communities’ knowledge of water sustainability, quality and protection on Nez Perce reservation. We will solicit Nez Perce Tribe tribal youth to observe and document their experience and learning on the division’s water projects (UST, LUST, Brownfields, TMDL, Solid Waste management, Water Utilities and waste water management, CWA-319-Nonpoint source and water quality monitoring effort) to develop an informational documentary video tool expressing the importance of changing demand, water efficiency, quality and protection for Tribal members and reservation communities. Through this tool, the tribe will have a better understanding of our water and its attributes in the home, environment and understand the Tribe’s continuing work on improving for water quality for future generations.

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Illinois

Metropolitan Tenants Organization (MTO)
Year: 2016
Healthy Homes

The CHHIC project will work with two Chicago neighborhoods, North Lawndale and Englewood, impacted by residential environmental hazards. The project will conduct educational outreach on home-based health hazards, including lead and major asthma triggers, such as mold, Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS), second-hand smoke, and dust mites and other pests that are known to trigger asthma. The goals of the project are to improve housing conditions and abate health hazards in these neighborhoods, while also providing a model for a city-wide housing inspection program. The project will pilot in-home housing inspections for 100 households, provide medical referrals for community residents, and provide lead and mold remediation referrals for landlord action.

Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT)
Year: 2015
Community Resiliency, Water Quality

The aim of this project is to help the neighborhood of Chatham become prepared for rain events as they continue to increase in frequency and strength over time. CNT, partnering with the Army Corps of Engineers, will design and test green infrastructure to improve storm water management and reduce urban flooding and water pollution. A Green Infrastructure model (Rain Ready) will be developed which can be replicated in other communities. Outputs include: 200 completed resident surveys, 100 residents attending meetings, 10 property assessments, and increased number of community leaders and partners addressing urban flooding and water quality.

United Congregations of Metro-East
Year: 2015
Air Quality

This project will engage the schools, senior citizens, and other residents in learning about air pollution by involving them in education programming and community science projects while highlighting ways to improve air quality. An Elm Air Sensing Network Monitor, an interactive tool to involve and educate residents about air quality and its relation to health, will be installed. The project will work with resident to construct an ozone garden to illustrate ozone and its effect on both plant and human life. In addition, six education sites and nine schools will be equipped with displays and education activities. Continued evaluations at educational sites will improve learning activities reflected by comments and visitors, support staff, and volunteers.

Safer Pest Control Project
Year: 2013
Toxic Substances

The goal of the Safer Pest Control Project is to empower Illinois state childcare providers to reduce or eliminate the need for pesticide use in childcare facilities and thereby lessen the exposure of young children to harmful pesticides. Through a combination of community education, needs assessment surveys, interviews and technical assistance, the organization seeks to increase compliance with state regulations and help implement Integrated Pest Management by establishing a Pesticide-Free Childcares Coalition. The organization will provide in-person, on site trainings as well as an online training module available in both English and Spanish.

Asian Health Coalition
Year: 2013
Air Quality

The Chinatown Environmental Empowerment Project aims to reduce asthma rates attributable to secondhand smoke in Chicago’s underserved and economically disadvantaged Chinatown community. By creating community based partnerships, the organization will develop culturally sensitive, bilingual education materials and workshops designed to address asthma rates and promote healthy indoor air quality.

Metropolitan Tenants Organization
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

The Suburban Cook County Healthy Homes Network (SCCHN). The SCCHHN will take proven healthy housing methods into impoverished areas of suburban Cook County, Illinois by creating a regional network of health care providers, housing advocates, and other social service providers. The project will work to improve the lives of tenants by educating and empowering them to have a voice in decisions that affect their ability to live in safe, decent, and affordable housing. Area families will be provided with a variety of tools and services including information about home-based health hazards, a healthy home inspection and training in identifying health hazards such as lead paint, mold and household pests.

Little Village Environmental Justice Organization
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

This project will conduct a grassroots Clean Power Campaign in the Chicago area to address coal power plant emissions. The project will complete weatherization of 100 housing units. The project will work with the Chicago Transit Authority to begin a new, twelve mile cross-town bus service that will serve 300000 people in seven Chicago community areas and the town of Cicero.

City of East St. Louis
Year: 2010
Job Training, Renewables and Energy Efficiency

This project will develop a green jobs training academy for green jobs in the building trades and lead abatement. This project will focus on four training sectors: weatherization, renewable energy technology installation, green roof installation, and lead abatement technology.

Metropolitan Tenants Organization
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances

Educating low-income individuals in rental buildings throughout Chicago about lead poisoning, pests, pesticide use and their rights as tenants. The project will include training and implementation guidance on how to mitigate lead risks and Integrated Pest Management systems. The project aims to reach up to1000 renters living in forty to seventy, troubled, larger multi-unit buildings.

People for Community Recovery
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances, Air Quality, Community Resiliency, Job Training

Educating youth aged 14-18 (and larger community) in the predominantly African American Altgeld Gardens, located on the Southside of Chicago, about harmful effects of multi-media environmental hazards. The project also seeks to engage the community in local and national EJ issues and provide them with environmental job opportunities. The project will include classroom instruction, hands-on activities, and social activism training. Topics will include: lead and asbestos awareness, mold identification and inspection, indoor air quality, hazardous materials and risk management, basic building inspection, and construction management.

Healthy Schools Campaign
Year: 2006/ 2007
Air Quality

The project will educate and empower parents with the knowledge and skills needed to become "agents of change" in improving the environmental quality of the community school. The parents will learn how to conduct and implement indoor air quality management programs at their schools to improve the indoor air quality of the schools. This project will be conducted in partnership with Community Organizing and Family Issues (COFI), and will use a training model that fosters peer-learning to teach the participating parents how to conduct and implement indoor air quality management programs at their schools. This training program will include information on: the connection between learning, health and school environment; how to conduct an indoor air assessment; and strategies for improving the school environment along with leadership skills necessary to build strong school support for these changes.

Generation Green Fund
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances

This project will reduce occupational and environmental exposures for Chicago Public School janitors and students by facilitating the adoption and implementation of a Chicago Board of Education “Green Cleaning” policy. Employees using cleaning chemicals and the students in the schools are being disproportionately exposed to unsafe and unhealthy conditions. The project will facilitate appropriate training, notification of risks, and protection from conventional cleaning products which contain harmful chemicals.

Southeast Environmental Task Force
Year: 2003
Air Quality, Water Quality

The project will educate high school students about the connectivity of air pollution to water pollution while helping to reduce the community’s exposure to fugitive dust particles. The project seeks to establish an industry, community, and classroom-based dust generation identification procedure and dust alert system. The dust identification procedure will create a line of communication between residents, community organizations, high school students, and industries to give residents an opportunity to protect themselves and their property from potential dust emissions.

Generation Green Fund
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency

Chicago School-Based Environmental Research Audit Project: This project will: (1) research and assess environmental hazards that exist in Chicago area schools; (2) identify and train community members to perform environmental audits in schools; (3) empower community members to take concrete action on school environmental health issues; (4) document the environmental exposures that exist in Chicago Public Schools; (5) provide concrete suggestions for improving specific school environments.

Wentworth Gardens Resident Management Association
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

This project is designed to identify and eliminate local environmental hazards by training resident peer educators who will assist in the implementation of asthma classes and environmental health workshops in the low-income Wentworth Gardens public housing development. The project will employ an environmental education model composed of peer-to peer outreach, environmental health workshops, and information distribution. The project will address asthma management and control, integrated pest management, and community health resources. The project is a joint partnership between the Wentworth Gardens Resident Management Association, the Pediatric Case Management Services, the Safer Pest Control Project, and the Chicago Housing Authority’s Environmental Unit.

The Field Museum ECP
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

The project, “Earth Force” will build community capacity to identify and address EJ issues by: (1) providing educators and community leaders from four program sites with the training and resources to support youth in utilizing problem-solving processes to address EJ issues; (2) providing 100 youth at four program sites and after school program sites with the opportunity to participate in the Earth Force environmental education program for one year; and (3) developing ongoing partnerships that facilitate communication and information exchange about EJ issues in the Chicago/Lake Calumet region. Training for educators, building community capacity, information networks and facilitating program implementation to empower youth will occur in partnership with the Grand Calumet Task Force and the Calumet Environmental Resource Center.

Neighborhood Law Office
Year: 2001
Water Quality

The project will facilitate the exchange of information in addressing the environmental threat of soil erosion into local waterways and flooding in the low-income, African American areas known as “below the bluff” caused by the continued development and urban sprawl in the affluent areas above the natural bluff. Citizens will be educated and encouraged to work together to find appropriate solutions that ensure the implementation of best management practices. This project will enhance community understanding of the impacts and causes of flooding and will facilitate a unified approach to managing stormwater and flood prevention. The project will: (1) explain the regulatory requirements of the Phase II stormwater regulations; (2) facilitate the exchange of ideas of citizens and administrators in solving the stormwater problems in a cost-effective manner; and (3) facilitate broad-based support in the development of a comprehensive stormwater management plan.

Chicago Housing Authority
Year: 2000
Air Quality, Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

The purpose of this project is to identify and to eliminate local environmental hazards through the training of community health educators who will assist in the design and implementation of asthma classes and environmental health workshops in the predominately African-American, low-income Washington Park Homes Development. Washington Park houses more than 1,900 residents, many of who contribute to the highest asthma-related hospitalization rates in the US. The project will employ an environmental education model composed of peer-to-peer outreach, environmental health workshops, and information distribution. The project will address asthma management and control, integrated pest management, and community health resources. The project is a joint partnership between the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) Washington Park Homes Local Advisory Council, the University of Chicago Asthma Center, the Safer Pest Control Project, and CHA’s Environmental Unit.

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Indiana

Near Northwest Neighborhood, Inc.
Year: 2017
Toxic Substances

The aim of this project is address high rates of lead exposure among children in the Near Northwest Neighborhood (NNN) of South Bend. In December 2016, it was reported that 31.3% of children in this Census tract have tested over the blood level of 5 micrograms per deciliter. In addition, over 48% of the residents in NNN live below the poverty line. By partnering with the local health department, this organization plans to reach 75% of families with children under the age of 7 to engage them on lead education and opportunities for lead screening. Outreach and education will be conducted through a variety of efforts including going door-to-door, holding public meetings, and engaging with local schools and churches.

Hoosier Environmental Council, Inc.
Year: 2012
Water Quality

The Hoosier Environmental Council’s (HEC) project will empower local communities to address pollution impacts caused by nearby concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). The HEC will educate residents on how to become actively and meaningfully involved in environmental permitting, compliance and enforcement, zoning, land use, and open government processes applicable to existing and proposed new CAFOs. The project will also provide information about water pollution and human health impacts associated with CAFOs, offer solutions to address those impacts, and explore legal and regulatory requirements applicable to CAFOs.

Improving Kids Environment
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

The “Building Lead Safe Communities” project will address the risk of lead exposure in children in area communities. The project will address significant public health risks of lead exposure in the Martindale-Brightwood and NearWest neighborhoods. Improving Kids Environment and its partners will compile block level soil lead data, measure the contribution of local emission sources of lead to neighborhoods by utilizing air sampling and analysis, identify hotspots and develop synergistic local solutions, and develop education and outreach materials designed to educate residents on safe urban gardening practices. The project also provides education on how to protect children from lead poisoning through neighborhood based healthy home visits.

Health Visions Midwest
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

This organization will implement a community-based lead poisoning education, testing, and awareness project in partnership with the Lake County Task Force. This project will serve low-income and minority communities located in Gary, Hammond and East Chicago, Indiana. This project will implement a strategic plan that includes providing education to parents, health and day care providers and the general public, case management and home risk assessment, and also to develop a speaker’s bureau and local clearinghouse of lead education materials and information.

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Iowa

Resource Conservation and Development for Northeast Iowa, Inc.
Year: 2018
Radon and Lead Mitigation Project

This project will unite local, county, and state partners to overcome lead and radon environmental health hazards in a minority-majority community that suffers from linguistic isolation, as well as social and economic disparities.  Activities include multilingual education and outreach to residents of the underserved, high-minority, community of Postville, Iowa to increase awareness, encourage action, and reduce incidence of lead poisoning and lung cancer.  The project will distribute free test kits for lead and radon testing, provide multi-lingual interpretation of results for residents, and bring together private and public partners so they can develop and implement remediation strategies and increase the flow of information about environmental and public health issues through use of verbal and written multi-lingual education, one-on-one and group outreach, and private and public partner outreach.  Outputs include multi-lingual printed outreach materials for lead and radon education in five languages developed and distributed to 830 households, dialog with and direct assistance to 50% of 2,227 community members; 800 (400 lead/400 radon) tests completed and interpreted; remediation planning on 75% of radon/lead tests completed, and a new local, county, and state public-private Task Force developed that will foster implementation of remediation strategies.

Clinton Substance Abuse Council
Year: 2017
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

This project seeks to raise awareness of the environmental and public health effects of improper medication storage and disposal in Clinton County, Iowa. In the local area, unused prescription medication is often flushed down the toilet which contaminates local water sources. Contaminants from pharmaceuticals can survive wastewater treatment and end up in surface water. By educating and empowering the community about these issues, project partners aim to reduce local water pollution and build consensus to prioritize proper medication storage/disposal in Clinton County. Area residents will engage in practices that promote proper medication disposal and environmentally-friendly behaviors. These changes in behavior will lead to the reduction of waste and contaminants in the water system. Trainings aim to reach up to 500 community residents.

Iowa Consortium for Comprehensive Cancer Control
Year: 2012
Air Quality

The Iowa Consortium for Comprehensive Cancer Control seeks to facilitate community efforts to reduce residential exposure to radon in the Drake Neighborhood in Des Moines, Iowa. The average indoor radon level in Iowa is six times higher than the national average. Indoor radon exposure is a particular threat to the health of Iowans. This project will facilitate community forums, provide radon education, and distribute approximately 1,000 educational brochures. It also will provide radon testing to the occupants of 48 housing units, and coordinate radon control services for homes with radon levels above the EPA's designated safety threshold. Low-income home owners and renters often lack the awareness and resources to test for radon in their homes.

Highway 63 Gateway Community Development Corporation
Year: 2012
Community Resiliency

The Highway 63 Gateway Community Development Corporation project will work towards addressing the environmental and public health issues affecting the neighborhoods surrounding a 22-acre former manufacturing site in Waterloo, Iowa. The project will focus on helping the affected community plan a redevelopment strategy including an appropriate re-use for the site based on existing conditions. It will also educate the neighborhoods surrounding the site through the dissemination of information and sustainable redevelopment planning initiatives. The Development Corporation will also assist residents to better understand their rights in regards to contamination exposure.

Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

This project will identify and research sources of pollution that potentially threaten the health and quality of life of local residents, and involve area residents in addressing the pollution. The target audience are community residents of a low-income portion of zip code 50317 located in the city of Des Moines. This low-income area is overburdened with industrial-type businesses and pollutants. Preliminary research revealed that for the year 1998, zip code 50317 was identified by the Environmental Defense Fund as ranking in the top 90 to 100 percentile for the dirtiest/worst zip codes in the United States for total environmental releases. The project will enhance understanding of the environmental and public health information systems by educating residents about the policies and government departments that deal with environmental concerns.

City of Waterloo, Iowa
Year: 2001
Water Quality

This project will study the drinking water in the city of Waterloos’ Cedar Valley Aquifer. This study will include the effects of the proximity of rail lines and maintenance facilities operating near the Waterloo Water Works to the future quality of the drinking water for the area.

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Kansas

Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation
Year: 2017
Water Quality

The Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation proposes to increase community stakeholder awareness of drinking water problems, hazards, exposure, illness, and performance gaps through establishing an abandoned well-closure program. Proper well closures will reduce health risks associated with contaminated groundwater, as contaminated water from abandoned wells leeches into groundwater. The program aims to 1) engage approximately 580 local community households through outreach and community events, 2) establish well closure procedures and Tribal ordinances for the purposes of protecting groundwater resources and the health and safety of those utilizing groundwater for their domestic and agricultural needs, and 3) close multiple wells in the initial phase of the program.

Diesel Health Project (DHP)
Year: 2015
Air Quality

Diesel Health Project will work with the communities to (1) identify the communities most impacted by exposure as a result of goods movement air pollution; (2) train residents regarding the risks of diesel exhaust exposure, how they can reduce their personal and family exposure, and how they can work together to improve the health of the community; (3) use the Collaborative Problem Solving model to identify issues, develop a vision and set goals in those neighborhoods; and 4) develop collaborative relationships between and among Kansas City, Kansas community groups, the MoKan Clean Air Coalition, community health organizations, environmental, public health, and other academic programs throughout the region, as well as with other members of the national Moving Forward Network. DHP is partnering with the University of Kansas, members of the Argentine Community, and the MoKan Clean Air Coalition to deliver the goals of this project.

Friends of the Kaw
Year: 2015
Water Quality

Friends of the Kaw will work with two high school classes to teach water quality classes that include classroom and field work. Ten students will be trained on water quality and water quality monitoring. These students will then plan a community event and teach courses to adult community members. In addition, 30 adults from the community will be selected to participate in water quality trainings that will be led by the students. Friends of the Kaw will then work with two middle schools and provide a similar curriculum to the one that was provided to the high school students. This time, the adults from the community will use the knowledge they gained and assist in the field sessions of the curriculum. This project will result in an intergenerational approach towards learning and teaching about water quality in Kansas City, Kansas. Participants will learn how their actions impact water quality and what they can do to improve water quality in their community.

Sunflower Community Action, Inc.
Year: 2015
Air Quality, Water Quality

The purpose of this project is to bring community stakeholders together to better understand the environmental factors that may be impacting the quality of life and health, and discuss action plans to improve air and water quality. It will be Sunflower’s job to act as researcher, organizer of the public and community organizations, and catalyst for a new look at corridor environmental quality. There are four component to this project: (1) Research - Sunflower staff and neighborhood leaders will gather information to identify and review the compliance history of local facilities; (2) Public Education - Sunflower will hold public meetings to educate neighbors about the environmental quality of air and water in 67214 and what can be done to improve it; (3) Leadership Training - Sunflower will recruit neighborhood leaders who will be organized and trained to engage businesses and environmental agencies regarding environmental quality; (4) Compliance Relationships - Sunflower Community Action intends to bring businesses, environmental agencies, and local government together with neighborhood leaders to see the results of Sunflower’s research and make the Wichita industrial corridor and adjacent neighborhoods a better place to live and work.

Sunflower Community Action, Inc.
Year: 2013
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Air Quality

Sunflower Community Action, Inc. seeks to educate more than 1,500 community members about the importance of energy efficiency as it relates to air quality. Through a comprehensive training program, participants will learn how reducing their energy consumption and encouraging the use of clean technologies will reduce the amount of soot and smog, improve community health, and reduce health care costs.

Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas
Year: 2012
Water Quality

The purpose of this project is to close and “plug” abandoned wells in the Kickapoo Watershed. Closing abandoned wells will reduce the amount of contaminants that enter the groundwater as surface runoff into the open wells. Educational and outreach materials will also be used to increase the community members’ awareness of groundwater contamination. The Kickapoo Tribe has recorded elevated levels of E.Coli bacteria and nitrates in the groundwater.

El Centro, Inc.
Year: 2011
Community Resiliency

The project will engage and inform the community about issues surrounding the redevelopment of the ECI Business Park in Kansas City, KS. Until 1902, the site was the former location of a silver smelter and a structural steel plant which closed in 1987. There are many on-site environmental hazards that preclude using the property for purposes such as housing. The project will empower local residents and stakeholders to facilitate the environmentally sensitive reuse and redevelopment of the site and help transform what has been perceived as a liability into a productive community asset.

Friends of the Kaw
Year: 2010
Farming and Fishing, Community Resiliency

With high rates of poverty, heavy pollutant loads, and other significant health risks, young people are exceptionally vulnerable to factors that impact their ability to thrive and grow into healthy adults. This project seeks to develop capacity to obtain community feedback on activities and increase participation in environmental decision-making. It also seeks to create opportunity for additional computer access and computer skills in the Quindaro community, and to improve access to information on fish consumption and the health effects of environmental pollutants.

El Centro, Inc.
Year: 2005
Toxic Substances

El Centro will develop a middle school/high school youth campaign and advocacy effort designed to increase awareness about childhood lead poisoning and increase prevention. The anticipated results of the project are a decrease in the number of children with elevated blood levels, an increase in the number of homes evaluated for lead and an increase in the number of children tested for lead. Partners include Empower for Health Partners; the University of Kansas School of Journalism, Broadcast and Public Relations, Advertising Faculty and Students; Unified School District 500; Kansas Department of Health and Environment; Wyandotte County Health Department and MANA de Kansas City.

Friends of the Kaw
Year: 2003
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

This public education project will provide necessary information regarding water quality and fish consumption to the affected communities along the Kaw River. The objectives include: (1) reducing the consumption of chlordane and mercury contaminated fish to recommended levels through a targeted education campaign, and (2) researching and compiling the ecological, public health, geographic, demographic, historic, cultural, land use, recreational use, and health/pollution status of the Kansas River.

University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc.
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency

This project will analyze the impact of Community Advisory Groups (CAGS) at Superfund sites to examine levels of satisfaction between communities with and without CAGS.

Indian Health Services (IHS)
Year: 2002
Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality, Job Training

This project will consist of providing solid waste, drinking water, and waste water operator certification training for Tribal environmental staff.

Sac and Fox Nation of MO in KS and NE
Year: 2002
Water Quality

This project is a waste water compliance project under which there will be a demonstration of the use of a wetland to comply with regulatory requirements.

Sunflower Community Action Inc.
Year: 2002
Solid Waste Disposal

This project will help community members fight illegal dumping of trash and hazardous materials in neighborhoods by empowering low income people through information sharing (i.e. workshops).

Associated Youth Services
Year: 2001
Farming and Fishing, Water Quality

This project will use John Garland Park, a former landfill designated as a park, to build a Heartland Greenhouse. The Greenhouse will demonstrate sustainable and environmentally safe design by improving the methane gas control system and reducing the leachate at John Garland Park.

Heart of America Family Services
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

This project will implement environmental and training programs for minority and low-income residents of Wyandotte County to ensure fair treatment and equal access to information about the impact of environmental toxins on brain development in children. Key community members from faith-based and community-based child care centers, service providers, visiting nurses and youth workers will learn the sources of environmental toxins in the home and at school and alternatives to harmful household products. The train-the trainer project will provide the communication and coordination of information through workshops.

Sunflower Community Action, Inc.
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

This project is aimed at the low income neighborhoods in Wichita containing a predominate number of poorly maintained, pre-1950 houses. Neighborhood leaders will be trained by public health officials to inform their neighbors about the dangers of lead and indoor air quality. There will be six public meetings providing opportunities for newly trained grassroots leaders to inform at least three-hundred community residents about lead poisoning and substandard air quality. Public health officials will also be connected with public school leadership to educate the parents of kindergarten and preschool children. Landlords will be encouraged to comply with federal lead paint disclosure requirements that have been in effect since 1996.

Shawnee County Health Agency
Year: 2000
Toxic Substances
Using a Lead Risk Assessment Program, the Shawnee Co. Health Agency (SCHA) desires to expand the existing lead poisoning prevention activities in Shawnee Co., targeting low-income, black and Hispanic children aged 0-6 and low-income tenants, homeowners and landlords in housing built before 1978. One available resource for expansion is the Home Visitation Action Team (HVAT), comprised of more than 15 organizations that conduct home visits to special populations and the at-large community. These visits provide numerous health services, and in cooperation with SCHA, will train all HVAT home visitors on conducting risk identification with a prepared questionnaire. Workshops will be held 3-4 times in a 12-month time frame for home visitors. SCHA seeks to increase awareness among the low-income community about the need to reduce lead hazards when remodeling older homes.

Unified Government of Wyandotte County
Year: 2000
Toxic Substances

The project Child Safe Program aims “To reduce the risk of contamination and illnesses associated with household hazardous products as well as mold and mildew to infants and children in child care facilities.” The target audience will be approximately 2,900 infants and children within 110 child care facilities that are located in predominately low income, racially/culturally diverse communities in Wyandotte Co., KS. In collaboration with several community organizations and the day care providers, Wyandotte Co. Health Department Child Care Staff will train 36 staff members on the reduction of toxins, mold, and mildew in child care facilities and will provide them with materials and educational resources. The staff members will also conduct site visits to reinforce education for the providers.

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Kentucky

Bluegrass Greensource
Year: 2017
Air Quality

Bluegrass Greensource will provide a series of 10 home energy workshops that will address air pollution in Central Kentucky communities facing high rates of exposure to both ozone and particulate matter. In terms of energy use, housing for low-income residents is disproportionally inefficient. Greater uptake of energy efficiency can result in lower emissions and reduced pollutants that contribute to ozone. Project partner How$martKY staff will teach workshop participants how to implement basic energy efficiency measures in their homes, while Bluegrass Greensource will provide energy efficiency information and free energy efficiency kits with materials participants can use in their homes. Each workshop will host between 60 – 300 community participants.

Appalachia – Science in the Public Interest, Inc.
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

This project aims to help households in Franklin County, Kentucky reduce household greenhouse emissions. FrankfortCAN will partner with local organizations. The local organizations will recruit people to join a team that will participate in the project. A special effort will be made to reach out to local organizations with ties to the low-income/minority population. Lighten Up, Frankfort! will use the book “The Low Carbon Diet “ to guide households through a series of actions to reduce their household energy use. The aim of the project is to have 400 households participate in the program with at least 75% of these participants completing in the program and reporting their results.

Appalshop, Inc.
Year: 2010
Water Quality, Air Quality

This project will focus on the effects of oil and gas recovery on water and air quality. The project will identify key stakeholders, gather information, and identify ways local decision-makers can respond to emerging issues. WMMT, the public radio station of Appalshop, Inc. in Whitesburg, KY, will partner with two county newspapers to carry out the project addressing issues raised by the increased level of oil and gas development in its broadcast area of southeast Kentucky. Twelve radio news features (5-7 minutes) and two call-in programs will be broadcasted. Articles concerning the issue will be printed in the county newspapers. The information will also be available via an interactive website.

Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances

Assisting the recipient’s efforts to expand its services to Medicaid eligible children ages 0-72 months within a five county area; who qualify, but are not registered for its services. They are primarily focusing on: (a) conducting in-home lead-based paint, environmental observations and (b) providing information on avoiding these hazards through diet and other exposure risks.  

West Jefferson County Community Task Force

Year: 2004
Air Quality

The grant project will assess cancer and non-cancer health risks from exposure to toxic air emissions that has impacted areas around the Rubbertown Complex in Louisville, Kentucky. This will be accomplished by engaging youth from the Louisville Urban League youth program to be the conduit for a health survey. The community/target audience engaged for the health survey will encompass residents who live within a 2-3 mile radius of the Rubbertown complex, and a small percentage of those who lived in the area in the 50's and 60's. The health survey will identify and assess, quantify and qualify health concerns of the community and provide a basis for historical trends on health symptoms, ailments and complaints. The overall results of the health survey will be used to develop a statistical data base of health information on residents of the impacted area around the Rubbertown Complex. The survey is expected to reach 2,000 persons.

Morehead State University
Year: 2003
Solid Waste Disposal

The University will conduct research to further the understanding of electronic waste as it relates to environmental and human health in Appalachian Kentucky. The purpose of the project is to detect, assess, and evaluate the economic and environmental impacts of recycling and the reuse of electronic waste.

University of Kentucky
Year: 2003
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The University will address the communities’ environmental issues within a two-mile radius of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The University wants to reduce the risks for the population that lives close to the plant and are exposed to the toxic pollutants. Data collected will provide research-based data to answer the community’s concerns about garden produce grown in a potentially contaminated soil and promote scientific knowledge for other communities in similar situations.

West Jefferson County Community Task Force
Year: 2001
Air Quality

The Risk Assessment/Risk Management Education Outreach project will address the West Jefferson County residents’ concern regarding the potential health threats from air pollutants. The purpose of this project is to develop an outreach strategy to present, inform and teach the community of the findings of the air toxins study. The project will: (1) develop a risk management plan in collaboration with representatives from the community, University of Louisville, local governments and medical professionals; (2) develop and maintain an Internet web site regarding the study and (3) prepare a video that would explain all aspects of the air toxic study.

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Louisiana

Teaching Responsible Earth Education (T.R.E.E.)
Year: 2017
Air Quality, Water Quality, Solid Waste, Toxic Substances

T.R.E.E.’s Sunship III program brings 7th grade students from local, low-income schools to the outdoor classroom. This project will increase access for economically disadvantaged students to life-changing educational opportunities that offer realities on planetary ecological functions. Over the 2017 to 2018 school year, T.R.E.E. will work with partners to serve 140 students and 20 teachers and adult volunteers with hands-on science learning. Each planned outdoor classroom experience will last for 3 days and 2 nights. Pre and post-tests will be designed to ensure that expected educational and environmental perception outcomes may be measured effectively. Funding support from interested schools and Shell Oil Company’s matching grant program are committed in advance to ensure that T.R.E.E. can increase its reach to new, low-income schools.

Mary Queen of Viet Nam Community Development Corporation (MQVN)
Year: 2016
Stormwater Management through Riparian Buffer Development and Installation

This project proposes to specifically address concerns related to the Clean Water Act, Section 104(b)(3) by demonstrating methods to manage stormwater runoff and reduce water pollution and which can be replicated in large developments in the Gulf South. MQVN will create, design, and implement a demonstration riparian buffer, the largest feature of the stormwater management/pollution reduction system, to address the issue of pollution in Bayou Michoud. The riparian buffer will comprise approximately three acres, and the site will be used to demonstrate the potential of reducing urban run-off from residential areas utilizing riparian buffers and other environmental designs that will have the added benefit of beautifying the surrounding residential area. In addition, MQVN will leverage its past experience in successfully engaging residents in community-based participatory research to monitor the efficacy of the riparian buffer, as well as disseminate data and engage in public outreach and education on methods to reduce urban run-off into the Bayou from the New Orleans East neighborhood. This project will be achieved through comprehensive collaborative partnerships, and these efforts will be multi-lingual to reflect the linguistic needs of the community.

Louisiana Environmental Action Network (LEAN)
Year: 2015
Community Resiliency

This project is a new collaborative effort between the Louisiana Environmental Action Network, Defenders of Our Land and Water, and Louisiana State University to empower community members and facilitate opportunities to identify and reduce local environmental concerns and threats to public health first in the small, rural Native American community of Grand Bois, LA and then to communities throughout Louisiana. LEAN and its partners will convene the 2015 People’s Collaborative Workshop. The workshop will bring together representatives of EJ communities from around the state that are affiliated with LEAN to identify local environmental hazards and take the first steps to develop an environmental hazards action plan for their community. Prior to the workshop, the partners will work closely with environmental leaders of the Grand Bois community and help them develop an action plan which will be used as a case study to inform the efforts of the workshop attendees.

Groundwork New Orleans
Year: 2014
Green Infrastructure, Youth Development, Water Quality

The Groundwork New Orleans “Environmental Justice Strategies: “Groundwork New Orleans Community Stormwater Management and Revitalization Program” will create an adaptable outdoor curriculum of service learning activities available to residents in underserved communities. The project seeks to improve the health and safety of area residents while adding aesthetic elements and recreational services that will improve quality of life and attract positive economic development. Residents will engage in interactive service-learning opportunities such as planting and caring for trees and flowers, trash disposal and recycling, and community workshops. Groundwork and its community partners will also work to integrate environmental justice into educational curricula at local schools where students will identify and discuss issues commonly facing underserved communities and learn about a range topics including coastal and urban ecosystems, water quality testing, and soil sampling.

Groundwork New Orleans
Year: 2013
Water Quality

The Green Slice Water Catchment Project seeks to eliminate water pollution and improve urban water quality in the Lower Ninth Ward neighborhoods throughout New Orleans. Groundwork New Orleans plans to address the city’s aging and insufficient water management infrastructure by introducing a water catchment system that will filter contaminants and reduce flow into the municipal storm water system. Projected environmental/public health results include reduced reliance on city drainage and pumping systems, reduced carbon footprint and decreased risk of minor flooding.

Acadiana Resource Conservation and Development, Inc.
Year: 2013
Water Quality

Acadiana Resource Conservation and Development, Inc. seeks to encourage public awareness and participation to help protect and maintain the Bayou Teche Watershed. The organization has planned a series of educational sessions and hands-on activities designed to address the causes, effects, prevention and elimination of water pollution. The focus of this community education effort will involve area high school students who will learn to protect the beneficial plants, fish and animal species that rely on the watershed by working with scientific partners to analyze water samples, identify pollutants and sources of pollution and participate in ongoing efforts to monitor water quality.

Atchafalaya Basinkeeper, Inc. (ABK)
Year: 2012
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing, Solid Waste Disposal

ABK will develop a stewardship program for community stakeholders to improve water quality and decrease industrial pollution, including litter and wetland loss in the Atchafalaya Basin. The program will provide training workshops focused on teaching fishermen and other users of the basin effective monitoring and reporting methods for possible violations of Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. The project will also educate residents on alternative ways to eliminate trash, reduce dumping in the Basin and educate fishermen on the impacts of littering. A network of concerned citizens and commercial fishermen will be created to monitor the waterways in an effort to work with local governments to better protect and improve the water quality and habitat of the Basin. The surrounding residents represent a diverse population such as French-speaking Cajun families, Laotian, African American, Vietnamese, Native American and Hispanic communities.

Mossville Environmental Action Now, Inc. (MEAN)
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

MEAN will host workshops which will help residents of Mossville, their physicians and medical providers better understand the connection between exposure to toxic substances and public health. The residents of Mossville live and work within close proximity to more than 14 industrial plants that emit high levels of toxic pollutants. The physicians and health professionals will receive training on how to administer an environmental health assessment which will lead to better diagnoses and treatment of the health impacts experienced by the community. The project will also provide information about the types of health effects that may be a result of exposure to toxic substances and how the community can reduce residents’ exposures.

Louisiana Bucket Brigade
Year: 2008/ 2009
Community Resiliency

Collaborating with refinery neighbors to develop a comprehensive understanding of unauthorized discharges from Louisiana's 17 refineries. This refinery efficiency initiative will review the incident reports that detail these discharges from 2005-2008. They will educate the neighbors through information sessions with the communities.

Louisiana Environmental Justice Community Organization Coalition
Year: 2007
Air Quality, Healthy Homes

The identified issue for this project is exposure of residents to toxic air emissions from industrial facilities. The environmental and/or public health result the community hopes to achieve is the reduction in exposure to toxic air emissions. LEJCOC will concentrate on two communities in Shreveport, LA and St. James Parish along Highway 44 and 18 and train residents on the use of Alternative Dispute Resolution so they will be empowered to negotiate with the industries in these two communities to reduce the residents' exposures. They will work with the industries to make changes to their equipment and/or operating controls, which may involve: (1) coming into compliance with permits; (2) meeting emission levels lower than the permit levels; and/or (3) instituting non-permit initiatives to reduce resident exposure.

McNeese State University
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances

The purpose of this project is to evaluate the long-term effects of Ethylene Bichloride (E.C.). Community residents, in the Lake Charles’ area, have been exposed to varying amounts of the chemical between 1994 and 1995 for a prolonged periods ranging from 6-18 months. Although physiological effects of E.C. have been studied by NOSH, OSHA, and EPA, little data exists concerning long-term neuropsychological effects (e.g., memory, executive functions and language). The research that does exist has involved small groups of individuals and has produced contradictory results. In the current study, we will evaluate 50 EDC-exposed individuals using standardized neuropsychological instruments to establish a database of documented impairments and guide affected individuals into the medical system for appropriate treatment. The primary investigator and two colleagues will work with two graduate students to conduct and interpret neuropsychological evaluation and provide public awareness meetings. The fundamental environment issue focuses on determining if specific individuals and the community at large suffer from or remain at risk to secondary EDC exposure.

Boat People S.O.S.
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

“Health and Environmental Risks Awareness Project in New Orleans” (HERAP_NO) will address fish consumption from polluted waters among the low-income Vietnamese refugee and immigrant community in New Orleans, and lead contamination in the waters where they fish (Mississippi River, Lake Ponchartrain, and surrounding bay areas). Neighborhood-based Support Groups (NSG) will be formed to assist HERAP_NO in this project. These leaders will be trained to test for lead contamination, how to read the results, and how to document the results and to proceed if levels exceed safe levels. Vietnamese young people will be recruited for the project and will be trained to conduct research to identify and assess sources of water pollution and lead contamination and to survey the community to determine their level of understanding about the contamination and the potential danger involved in fish consumption from these waters. Flyers, brochures, and other information materials on this research will be shared with the community at community workshops and meetings. Target: 5,000 low-income Vietnamese immigrant/refugee families composed of many elderly who can’t speak English.

Louisiana Environmental Justice Project
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances

This project will provide necessary information on low-income African-American and Hispanic, residents regarding blood levels and levels of understanding of the dangers of lead contamination, based on research conducted within the communities by trained fellow community residents. African-American children are five times more likely to suffer from lead poisoning than Anglo children, but more information is needed. In the Hispanic community, data from screenings is lacking and the extent of lead-related problems is unclear. Community personnel will be hired and trained to go door-to-door to conduct pre-screenings and surveys in these communities, targeting at least 1,500 households in two neighborhoods for general canvassing. They will meet twice monthly to plan and participate in the training programs provided by the Lead Speakers’ Bureau. The information will be restructured to be understandable to the trainees. The results of the research will then be presented to the communities in a culturally relevant manner. The results of this community-based, grassroots-centered project on lead poisoning will be compiled into a report that will be shared nation-wide via Leadnet. Target: Three low-income, ethnically diverse communities: the Eighth Ward–African-American community, and the Carrolton/Mid-City Hispanic neighborhood.

Mossville Environmental Action Now, Inc. (MEAN)
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

The “Comprehensive Environmental Response: Community Health and Education” project will enable MEAN to conduct an environmental health needs assessment of approximately one-thousand households. The survey results will be shared with the different state and federal agencies involved in Calcasieu environmental issues. Six community meetings will then be held in the different communities to inform the people of the results. Information will also be provided on how to improve environmental safety in their homes and jobs. The information will also be disseminated in MEAN’s monthly newsletter. Medical and environmental experts will be invited to participate in two “Community Education” workshops where the research will be discussed. Health issues raised as a result of the research will also be discussed and the experts will be able to provide ideas about how to address environmental health concerns.

The Louisiana Bucket Brigade (LABB)
Year: 2001
Air Quality

The Community Air Quality Project will strive to build capacity and involve the community in the design of activities to address the air quality concerns of the residents living near industrial plants in Norco, New Sarpy and Convent, Louisiana. The project will also generate information on pollution in the community by providing air sampling information and photos and videos of pollution as it is happening. Health professionals and scientists will be utilized to enhance the communities’ understanding of environmental health and environmental information systems. Community volunteers will be trained to collect and interpret the data in order to understand the effects of air quality on human health and the environment. All information will be posted to LABB’s Web site so that the benefits of these activities will be multiplied. The LABB will also promote increased oversight and enforcement action regarding industries that continue to pollute.

Louisiana Environmental Action Network (LEAN)
Year: 2000
Water Quality

The Environmental Justice Riverkeeper project addresses water quality along the lower Mississippi (known as the Industrial Corridor or “Cancer Alley”) and targets five African-American communities with high levels of toxins in their water supply. The project’s goals include: create an organized network of communities to work on water quality issues and an information exchange network; serve as liaison between local community organizations, government agencies and regional environmental groups. Technical resources will be translated into a format accessible to local residents.

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Maine

Aroostock Band of Micmacs
Year: 2011
Air Quality

Arrostock Band of Micmacs seeks to addresses air pollution through community education initiative. The project establishes a sustainable approach for disseminating air quality information to communities most susceptible to adverse health effects associated with air pollution. The project will also provide community education about the causes, extent, and occurrence of local air quality pollutants.

Central Maine Community Health Corp/Healthy Androscoggin
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances

The "New Mainer Healthy Homes Advocacy and Education" Project will help New Mainers, resettled immigrant families, understand their rights to quality housing that is free of lead, pests, mold, and harmful pesticides. The overall purpose of the project is to empower New Mainers with the knowledge to protect their families from these environmental hazards. The goals of the project will be achieved by utilizing the Healthy Homes Healthy Families community partnership and will include education, home visits, and recruiting and training of Neighbor-to-Neighbor community educators.

United Somali Women of Maine
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances

Developing and implementing an outreach campaign on lead hazards, the risks of pesticide application, and basic life skills to educate the refugee population residing in the Lewiston/Auburn area of central Maine. The project’s goals are to increase community capacity to ensure the environmental quality and safety of their home environments while also reducing lead and pesticide hazards in homes.

Passamaquoddy Tribe Sipayik
Year: 2003
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

Through the project, tissue samples from five marine species typically consumed by the Passamaquoddy Tribe will be collected and tested for dioxin and several heavy metals. Tissue results from the project will be compared with those of a previous study done in 1998. The additional testing will provide sufficient data for the Tribe to conduct a risk assessment. Results of the risk assessment will be discussed at several public meetings, which will also allow for residents to voice their concerns. The Passamaquoddy Tribe is an indigenous Native American Tribe on eastern Maine and Maritime Canada. Culturally, the Passamaquoddy is one of several tribes of the Abanaki group. Pleasant Point Reservation is located in the easternmost region of the United States, on a narrow peninsula between the towns of Perry and Eastport. The Reservation consists of 100 acres originally deeded to the Tribe by the state. An additional 210 acres of land adjacent to the original parcel in the towns of Perry, Pembroke and Robbinston were annexed by the Tribe. Another reservation, Indian Township, is located 50 miles inland.

Penobscot Indian Nation
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

A Strategy for Controlling Toxics into the Penobscot Nation Reservation. The project will develop information for the Penobscot Nation to use while dealing with sources of toxic pollution that are beyond the Nation’s territorial jurisdiction. The project will include the following steps: (1) Review what is already known about mercury, PCBs and other toxic pollutants in the Penobscot River. (2) Review what is already documented about the cultural importance of the River for tribal members. (3) Prepare a report explaining the existing regulatory framework for controlling suspected sources of mercury, PCBs, and other toxic pollutants. (4) Prepare a short paper designed to help communicate to individuals and groups in the larger society how pollution in the River affects the Nation differently from other groups. (5) Conduct a workshop on the report and paper for Nation’s Tribal Council, tribal staff and tribal attorneys. (6) Conduct a series of meetings with stakeholder organizations. (7) Devise a strategic options plan that can be followed to move forward with the information and networks that will have been developed.

Bayside Neighborhood Association (BNA)
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

The BNA has been and is, the critical bridge for communication among Bayside residents, city officials and developers. BNA’s vision is to promote neighborhood revitalization and address concerns about lead contaminated soils. The objectives of this project are (1) to perform lead analyses on urban residential soils in the Bayside Neighborhood, in Portland, Maine; (2) to apply a low cost, in-situ mitigation technique (phytoremediation) using food source plants to remediate lead contamination in backyard gardens; and (3) to inform the public of the research results.

Maine Lead Action Project (MLAP)
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

The MLAP will partner with three existing Healthy Communities/ Communities for Children coalitions in Houlton, Bath, and Rumford communities to develop prevention and education intervention campaigns targeting low-income, high-risk populations. Specifically the project would establish a primary prevention model with the following goals: (1) Increase awareness of childhood lead poisoning prevention among all target communities, with a special focus on outreach to low-income families; (2) Promote lead screening of children, which will serve to educate families about lead poisoning and provide an interim baseline of information about the prevalence of the problem; (3) Strengthen organization, agency, and business partnerships including those with daycare providers, healthcare providers, social services agencies, landlords, realtors, and others in order to facilitate information exchange that will promote a nurturing community with safe housing where our children can live, grow, and thrive. MLAP will measure the success of the project by determining if there is a marked increase in the number of lead screenings in the three project communities.

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Maryland

Patapsco Latino Action Network
Year: 2017
Water Quality, Marine Debris

The Patapsco Latino Action Network (PLAN) project seeks to clean-up marine debris and engage community residents in the local Baltimore neighborhoods of Brooklyn and Curtis Bay. These neighborhoods are in close proximity to high levels of industrial activity and the impaired Patapsco River branch of Baltimore Harbor. The project will expand the use of the program’s community-led conservation model in the communities. Additional project activities include: (1) organizing four clean-ups and three neighborhood beautification events, (2) surveying community members on perception of marine debris and other environmental issues, (3) developing Spanish-language outreach materials, (4) conducting educational outreach to PLAN partners on marine debris and other environmental challenges in the Brooklyn/Curtis Bay, and (5) developing a marine debris mitigation action plan.

CASA de Maryland, Inc.
Year: 2016
Healthy Homes and Housing Policy Improvements

This project aims to address unhealthy housing conditions and develop housing policy improvements in the Langley Park community. Common environmental hazards in Langley Park apartment complexes include vermin and insect infestations, failing heating and plumbing systems, and problems with mold and moisture. These hazards are linked to several health issues, including asthma (due to mold and pest droppings), cancers and developmental issues in children (due to chemical exposures to homemade pesticides and fungicides), and carbon monoxide poisoning (due to using the stove as a source of heat). CASA’s Langley Park Housing Matters Campaign will: 1) establish a broad multi-stakeholder coalition dedicated to advancing healthy housing and improving environmental conditions; 2) educate and engage residents to avoid environmental health hazards and work with apartment complex management and the County to resolve complaints; and 3) research and develop a list of policy recommendations focusing on strengthening existing regulations and creating new ones to improve environmental conditions in Langley Park.

Parks & People
Year: 2015
Farming and Fishing

Healthy urban soils play a critical role in building communities that are food secure and environmentally resilient. This project will focus on vacant lot sites located in Baltimore City’s East and West/Southwest Public Housing Development areas, providing outreach and hands-on-training to residents engaged in edible gardening. Specifically, the project aims to educate over 2,000 city residents on the importance of soil and the preventive and precautionary measures of dealing with soil contaminants, provide hands-on training to 12-15 community youth in soil sample collection, sample analysis and soil remediation, provide assistance for the collection and analysis of 30 soil tests in the targeted communities, and select 4-6 vacant lot demonstration sites (based on soil sampling results) to conduct hands-on training in either soil remediation or mitigation strategies, such as building raised beds. Furthermore, the proposed project seeks to increase the area of “green” spaces in these communities, which will help reduce the amount of stormwater runoff and the “heat island” effect caused by impervious surfaces (e.g., roofs, sidewalks, roadways).

Coalition to End Childhood Lead Poisoning
Year: 2013
Toxic Substances

The Coalition to End Childhood Lead Poisoning seeks to increase public awareness of the risks associated with lead paint poisoning in accordance with the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) new recommendation to lower the reference level for blood lead levels in children. The goal of this project is to increase community knowledge of available services, and educate health care practitioners on how to handle the new regulations and an expected influx of new cases in light of the CDC recommendation. The organization will distribute updated educational materials to area health care facilities, child care facilities and area residents. The campaign will target the entirety of the City of Baltimore with emphasis on neighborhoods that have high concentrations of elevated blood lead levels in children and high minority populations.

Episcopal Community Services of Maryland
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

Supporting the implementation of an intergenerational community education program to address the issues of household health factors that contribute to lead poisoning and asthma in Collington Square –an impoverished urban neighborhood in East Baltimore. The planning and implementation of this project will contribute to the increased knowledge base of community residents as they seek to address these environmental and public health issues.

Coalition to End Childhood Lead Poisoning
Year: 2005
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

The Coalition project will provide a sustainable multimedia outreach and education campaign to tenants and rental property owners in Baltimore City about lead poisoning. It will focus on pre1978 rental properties. The objectives are to: empower tenants to understand and assert rights under federal laws for the safe repair of lead hazards in their homes; empower parents to insure that lead hazards are addressed in their children’s drinking water supply; and assist rental property owners and contractors in increasing compliance under federal lead related laws for lead safe work practices and disposal of lead hazardous materials. Partners include the Maryland Lead Poisoning Prevention and Healthy Homes Partnership, Baltimore City Public School System and the Baltimore City Health Department.

Thorpe Foundation
Year: 2003
Water Quality

The purpose of this project is to identify and address environmental issues associated with the Catoctin Mountain water source and its migration to the Chesapeake Bay through classroom and field study. This project seeks to empower and educate the “at-risks” youth in Emmitsburg and Thurmont in northern Frederic County and City, Maryland.

Park-Reist Corridor Coalition
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

The program, “ALERT: Asthma and Lead Education Readiness Training” focuses on educating approximately 100 teenage mothers from low-income, inner-city Baltimore neighborhoods on the dangers of lead poisoning and asthma. It intends to hold monthly meetings with stakeholders to assist in training and to supplement this training with teaching the teenage mothers to use internet resources regarding asthma and lead poisoning.

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Massachusetts

Central Maine Community Health Corporation (CMCHC)
Year: 2018
Toxic Substances, Lead Exposure, Safe Housing

The Central Maine Community Health Corporation (CMCHC) and partners seek to help the underserved community residents of downtown Lewiston who experience extreme poverty and disproportionate housing-related health impacts, including lead exposure and asthma, by increasing the number of healthy residential housing units available and empowering those residents to access healthy housing.  This project was born out of a community-driven effort and CMCHC’s Neighbor-to-Neighbor program where community residents identified the need for the city and local organizations to support local landlords to improve their housing stock and remediate environmental housing hazards.  After convening diverse stakeholders, CMCHC will implement strategies that provide tools and resources to landlords to create healthier housing and empower the underserved community to access safe housing.  Project activities include: 1) creation of a Safe Housing Public Database of local rental units that have passed a recent health inspection, 2) outreach and education for the underserved community residents in downtown Lewiston to notify them of new resources for finding safe housing, 3) recurring First-time Investment Property Owner workshops; 4) creating a Landlord Network for landlords and other housing stakeholders, 5)  creating  a Rental Registration and Inspection Program in Lewiston; and 6) marketing and promotion of local landlords who are working to provide safe housing.


The Trustees of Reservations (ToR)
Year: 2015
Job Training, Farming and Fishing, Air Quality, Water Quality

The Boston Youth Conservation Corps (YCC) seeks to empower and educate urban youth ages 15 – 18 about their local environment, while engaging them in experiential learning and developing job-readiness skills. Projects such as enhancing urban greenways, tending gardens, and planting native vegetation trails immerse teens in the natural and green spaces of the city, while raising their awareness of pollution, air and water quality, access to healthy food, and organic vs. conventional food production. For many participants, the YCC is their first exposure to issues of environmental and food justice. YCC participants raise awareness within their communities about local environmental and public health issues, and emerge from the program as passionate environmental stewards with the commitment and skills to address environmental justice issues in Boston. The project seeks to address high rates of asthma, diabetes and obesity in Boston’s poorest neighborhoods that report a disproportionately high number of asthma incidents and diabetes hospitalizations, disproportionately high rates of adult obesity and the least amount of open space per child.

Regional Environmental Council (REC)
Year: 2015
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

The project will promote efficient water use, storm water run-off prevention, and the use of gardening practices. REC’s project also seeks to increase access to healthy food in Worcester’s lowest-income/highest risk neighborhoods through an educational program for urban gardeners in Worcester, MA. Greening our Gardens project activities will educate gardeners on these practices via community workshops on strategies that urban growers can use to implement these practices through intensive support at four community gardens to strengthen capacity to sustainably grow healthy food, and build sustainability through the creation of a resource guide for the network of 60+ community and school gardens supported by the REC. The project will impact gardens across the city, but resources will be focused in Worcester’s five lowest-income/highest-risk neighborhoods. REC is partnering with the Stockbridge School of Agriculture and the MA Chapter of the Northeast Organic Farming Association.

Montachusett Opportunity Council
Year: 2014
Water Quality

Through its “Clearwater Revival” project, the Montachusett Opportunity Council (MOC) seeks to address the negative impacts of stormwater runoff from the polluted Nashua River in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. By helping to reduce the river’s bacterial, viral, and parasitic load that threatens the health and vitality of Fitchburg’s low-income residents, MOC and its partners will raise community awareness about storm water runoff and water pollution prevention. Residents will benefit from community workshops, “park and walk” audits, and interaction with community leaders and decision makers. Another key effort of this project is the development of youth peer leaders who will build community capacity by creating videos, leading neighborhood educational tours, and hosting workshops to educate residents about local water quality issues.
 

Partners for a Healthier Community, Inc.
Year: 2014
Healthy Homes

The “Springfield Healthy Homes Collaborative” will work to reduce the disproportionately high rates of asthma and poor housing conditions in low-income neighborhoods throughout Springfield, Massachusetts. The main focus of this collaborative is to reduce residents’ exposure to lead and other toxins by implementing a Healthy Homes approach that integrates harm reduction and home remediation strategies. Community residents will be actively involved in leadership roles and project planning and implementation, while working with local government leaders and decision-makers. Specifically, residents will partner with housing organizations and local government to form a task force charged with conducting neighborhood household assessments, identifying and educating high-risk families and children, and advocating for funding to sustain and implement Healthy Home initiatives area-wide.

Health Resources in Action
Year: 2013
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The project seeks to educate child care professionals on best practices for controlling lead poisoning and asthma triggers in home-based childcare facilities. The Boston Healthy Homes and Schools Collaborative (BHHSC) will build on existing partnerships to engage the community in education, training, and policy initiatives targeting area home-based child care facilities. By encouraging behavior changes and conducting trainings focused on healthy homes initiatives, the project will also address the disproportionate rates of asthma and lead poisoning among children in Boston's low-income neighborhoods.

Alternatives for Community and Environment (ACE)
Year: 2013
Air Quality, Community Resiliency

ACE will educate area residents and decision makers about potential environmental hazards in New Bedford, Massachusetts communities and provide support and guidance to local community organizations about productively working in collaboration with state and federal agencies. Information will be used to create factsheets and other materials to be distributed via community listening sessions designed to educate residents and area workers about public health threats that exist near homes and work sites. ACE will investigate the impacts of dredged sediments on local air quality and public health in communities where residents suffer from disproportionately higher rates of cancer, asthma and cardiovascular disease. ACE and its partners will investigate and document contaminated sites and the cumulative impacts of those sites.

JSI Research and Training Institute
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

The goal of this project is to build the capacity of Latino youth in Lawrence, MA to take a leadership role in identifying and addressing toxic exposures in the home. Youth leaders will teach community members to conduct in-home assessments to identify health hazards such as lead and other asthma triggers and how to safely store and use household pesticides and chemicals. Project participants will also develop the skills necessary to engage in outreach opportunities by hosting community workshops, facilitating peer-to-peer trainings and presenting the project and related findings to the Mayor’s Health Task Force.

Partners for a Healthier Community
Year: 2012
Air Quality

The Springfield Community Air Mobilization Project (SCAMP) will work with residents in several Springfield, Massachusetts neighborhoods impacted by high levels of outdoor air pollution and other environmental hazards. The goal of this project is to foster full resident participation in efforts to educate community residents on how to assess air quality, understand associated health concerns, conduct air monitoring/assessment and implement strategies to reduce exposure and health risks. SCAMP will also partner with area schools to educate youth on strategies to address air quality issues and prepare them to become community leaders.

Groundwork Lawrence
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency, Farming and Fishing

Groundwork Lawrence seeks to educate low-income residents about the importance of safe soil and steps to reduce their exposure to contaminated soil. They will work with residents to test the soil in their backyard for contaminants such as lead and map these soil tests along with existing data made available as part of the city’s home de-leading program. Maps that identify contaminated hot-spots will be used for future city planning. The project will also work with partners in the community to replace the contaminated soil in one of the vacant lots currently being used for gardening by local residents.

Regional Environmental Council
Year: 2012
Air Quality, Renewables and Energy Efficiency

The Regional Environmental Council (REC) seeks to educate and mobilize residents in Worchester neighborhoods to address environmental and health issues associated with poor indoor air quality. REC will engage and encourage community support by hosting a series of locally based workshops, door to door canvassing events, and partnering with area small businesses and faith-based organizations. REC will work with residents to improve ventilation and air circulation in older homes, identify and reduce excessive moisture and reduce potentially harmful biological agents as they relate to indoor air quality. The project will also provide residents with resources and information necessary to access local and state energy efficiency programs in an effort to reduce carbon emissions as well as lower energy and heating costs.

Health Resources in Action
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The Boston Healthy Homes and Schools Collaborative (BHHSC) addresses lead poisoning and asthma in low-income Boston neighborhoods. The BHHSC, a program of Health Resources in Action (HRiA), will address environmental health hazards in residents of low-income and predominantly minority Boston neighborhoods. The project focuses on the city’s 800 licensed Family Childcare Providers (FCPs) who care for children in their own homes. Sixty percent of Boston’s FCPs (serving 3500 children) are located in the low-income neighborhoods with a prevalence of lead poisoning and/or asthma. BHHSC will encourage FCPs to change behavior and improve living conditions through healthy housing education and the development of an Enviro-Healthy Family Childcare Certification Program.

Nuestra Communidad
Year: 2011
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Air Quality

Nuestra Communidad facilitates access to weatherization services to Grove Hall Residents. This project connects residents of the Grove Hall section of Boston with low or no cost weatherization services. Nuestra will collaborate with local grassroots organizations to educate over 2500 Grove Hall residents about the benefits of weatherization through an intensive, geographically focused campaign.

Groundwork Somerville
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

Through the project "Combating Climate Change on a Local Level", Groundwork Somerville’s (GWS) High School Green Team will conduct a 20-week, door-to-door energy efficiency campaign focused on encouraging residents and business owners in the East Somerville and Clarendon Hill communities to replace incandescent light bulbs with more energy efficient compact florescent light bulbs. The Green Team also will host three “Energy Education Fairs.” The fairs will focus on reducing home energy consumption, implementing energy-efficiency measures, and highlighting critical links between home energy use and climate change impacts. The goals of the project are to build awareness and provide practical instruction about home energy efficiency and how it relates to global climate change.

Boston Public Health Commission
Year: 2010
Air Quality, Job Training

The Boston Safe Shops Project is designed to protect the health and well being of workers in small automotive repair shops and the neighborhoods in which they are located by preventing air pollution, promoting green job growth, and connecting workers with education and health care resources. Grant funds will be used to offer a new and important component to this project - a skills training program leading to certification on repair and maintenance of hybrid vehicles. This training will act as an incentive to implement pollution reducing alternative products in neighborhood shops.

Chelsea Neighborhood Development
Year: 2010
Solid Waste Disposal

"Cleaner Chelsea Campaign" will educate residents about new trash collection procedures, reduce litter on the streets, and increase recycling tonnage in Chelsea. Through community and City partnerships, the Cleaner Chelsea Campaign will coordinate city-wide public outreach and education about recycling which will include home visits, distribution of recycling bins, and house meetings. The project goal is to increase recycling from 7% to 14% citywide.

Groundworks Lawrence
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Water Quality, Air Quality

The GreenStreets Tree Planting Program works to increase vital tree cover in a sustainable manner in the City's densely populated, low-income urban environments. Groundworks Lawrence works directly with homeowners to increase the urban tree canopy by providing educational workshops, technical assistance, and supplies free of cost. The GreenStreets Tree Planting Program seeks to address the impacts of climate change by increasing the urban tree canopy which will sequester and absorb carbon dioxide. An increase in the urban tree canopy also mitigates the heat island effect by reducing energy costs, decreases storm water runoff and erosion, and improves air quality.

Worcester Roots
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

Through the project “Toxic Soil Busters: Soil Science Research for Healthy Neighborhoods,” Worcester Roots will investigate the effectiveness of low-cost remediation methods for lead soil contamination. The project will involve the implementation of low-cost remediation techniques, soil science research, and GIS data mapping. Participants of Worcester Roots’ lead safe landscaping program will partner with researchers from institutions of higher education to learn scientific methods and implement activities. Worcester Roots will produce written materials to aid residents and community based organizations in implementing techniques based on research findings.

Main South Community Development Corporation
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Job Training

The project “Building Community Participation in Clean Energy and Green Infrastructure Projects” will assist residents of the Kilby/Gardener/Hammond neighborhood in developing knowledge about the clean energy and green infrastructure sectors to positively impact their quality of life and health. Knowledge about these sectors will empower the community to meaningfully participate in future development projects in their neighborhood. Particular attention will be paid to the involvement of neighborhood youth through local schools and the Boys and Girls Club. An additional benefit will be the introduction of green job networks, as residents interact with professionals and are introduced to green job skills training offered by local community colleges.

Spanish American Union, Inc.
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

Improving the quality of the indoor environment in public housing developments by reducing exposure to pesticides, encouraging integrated pest management, and reducing asthma triggers for families at risk. The project will collaborate with partners and work with youth to provide education, outreach and encourage actions to raise awareness and reduce health hazards and risks from pesticides for families in public housing in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Vietnamese American Initiative for Development
Year: 2007
Fish Consumption, Water Quality

The identified issue for this project is worker exposure to flammable and toxic floor finishing products. The environmental and/or public health result desired is the reduction in exposure to these toxics by floor finish workers. Viet-AID will accomplish this goal by: (1) working with and educating business owners and workers to practice safer handling techniques and use less toxic alternative floor finishing products; (2) work with business owners to promote product replacement by switching to less toxic products; (3) working with state and local governments to adopt legislation that requires floor finishers to be certified and to ban toxic lacquer sealers; and (4) educating customers on less toxic floor finishing products.

Committee for Boston Public Housing, Inc.
Year: 2006/ 2007
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The project will reduce the exposure of children to the air toxins associated with the use of the pesticides, insecticides, fungicides, and rodenticides used by public housing residents by conducting in-home training on Integrated Pest Management (IPM). IPM focuses on using safer pest elimination methods and reducing and/or eliminating the number of pesticides used in the homes as well as its relationship to asthma exacerbation. The program will offer a pesticide exchange program and replace commercial pesticides with Home Safe kits and with input from residents, create a public health campaign and the dangers of pesticide use.

Lawrence Environmental Action Group (LEAG)
Year: 2005
Community Resiliency

LEAG will conduct research to increase the scientific understanding of the implications of using mercury in spiritual and cultural ceremonies and to understand its effects on the health and well being of the community of Lawrence, Mass. This project seeks to educate the residents through the dissemination of bilingual educational information and facilitate meetings between residents, public officials, neighborhood/civic groups and health-related organizations to address the environmental and public health concerns of the residents related to this environmental exposure. Partners include the JSI Center for Environmental Health Studies, Casa de Salud and several Lawrence city officials and agencies.

Neighborhood of Affordable Housing (NOAH)
Year: 2004
Job Training, Community Resiliency

As part of the Chelsea Creek Vision Plan, NOAH and its partners will train two environmental youth crews. The crews will be trained to identify and categorize contamination levels at key sites along the creek using available site histories and local knowledge. Based on the type and level of contamination, the crews will research and identify best practices for remediation of those sites as well as determine possible liability issues. Students from the Urban Ecology Institute will research policy barriers preventing the transfer of control over the identified sites to partners wishing to create public open space on the site.

Neighborhood of Affordable Housing (NOAH)
Year: 2003
Air Quality, Water Quality

Business and Community Environmental Justice Roundtable on Chelsea Creek: The project will consist of three roundtable discussions designed to bring together local businesses owners and citizens along the Chelsea Creek in Chelsea and East Boston, Massachusetts. The principal goals of the roundtables are: (1) Encourage business “buy-in” to the community’s Chelsea Creek Vision Plan; (2) Foster business collaboration and investment in specific cleanup and Brownfields redevelopment projects; and (3) Find mutually agreeable ways to improve air and water quality. Specifically, the project will improve air quality by adding forest cover and green space along the creek. Water quality will be addressed by cleaning up waterfront Brownfields sites. NOAH’s mission is to extend the supply of quality affordable housing and foster economic growth, as well as to act as a catalyst for a variety of community initiatives.

Pioneer Valley Project (PVP)
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The goal of this project is to reduce the incidence of lead poisoning and asthma-related hospitalizations from neighborhoods in Springfield, Massachusetts, by 10 percent within a year. To successfully meet of this goal, PVP will: (1) Facilitate information exchange, resource sharing and collaboration between partners to address disproportionate exposure of residents to indoor environmental hazards in the target area; (2) Build on Springfield’s extensive network of community organizers, family advocates and community health workers to identify housing bearing disproportionate burdens and help engage members of the target audience in problem-solving and health education; (3) Interpret environmental data using Geographic Information Systems and other tools to assist the public in understanding the impact of indoor environmental hazards. PVP is a coalition of church, labor and community groups working for social change. PV is a member of the InterValley Project and the Organizing and Leadership Training regional networks. This network helps leaders of religious, labor, tenant and immigrant groups to address the environmental, economic and social justice issues that affect low-income members of their communities.

Regional Environmental Council (REC)
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

The goals of the project are to: (1) Improve the health of residents in Worcester, Massachusetts disproportionately impacted by environmental hazards by building awareness of toxic chemicals in and around the home, and teaching residents to avoid exposure by purchasing alternative products that are not as toxic; (2) Build stronger links among community groups, churches, REC, health care providers, students and city agencies; and (3) Train community leaders on how to research and interpret health and environmental data. The REC builds public awareness of local environmental issues through research and education. Programs focus on inner-city neighborhoods who have traditionally been excluded from the environmental decision-making process. REC also spearheads local and regional environmental advocacy, especially for parks, trails, open and green space, Brownfields redevelopment, recycling, environmental justice and water protection.

University of Massachusetts (UMass)Dartmouth
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances

Environmental Data Transfer Project: The Dartmouth Lead Program offers comprehensive lead poisoning prevention services to residents of southeastern Massachusetts. The following services will be provided: screening, family counseling, lead inspections/legal enforcement, education, and financial assistance for de-leading. The goal of this project is to add the environmental activities (lead inspections, re-inspections, court appearances, etc.) from approximately 2,000 UMass Dartmouth Lead files to the state of Massachusetts’ Environmental Record Database. UMass Dartmouth will engage a computer software company to create the necessary software to accomplish the proposed transfer of information, and will hire a part-time employee to do the data entry work.

Mystic River Watershed Association
Year: 2002
Water Quality

In order to facilitate communication and information exchange, MyRWA proposes a multi-tiered approach for Environmental Justice Across the Mystic, offering a range of levels of engagement. Public Forums (3) are envisioned as a means to create interest in the wider community, offering evening gatherings that have value as one-time events, while building future training and summits opportunities. EJ Workshops (2) are targeted for varied sectors of watershed constituents, including specific high target groups such as municipal officials and employees, community-based organizations, watershed groups, as well as general residents. These will utilize the EPA EJ Training Collaborative methodology and materials carried out by partners who have completed EJTC training and/or have extensive EJ expertise. The Mystic Watershed EJ Summit is a half-day gathering of participants invited from all of the above activities as well as strategic invitees, such as the Mystic EJ Advisory Committee, to focus on providing a format for reflection on the outcomes and lessons gained from the forums and EJ trainings, as applied to the communities and daily lives of the residents of the watershed. Faculty from Tufts WaterSHED Center and the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies (CIS) have partnered with MyRWA in the implementation of the Tufts New Century Environmental Leadership Institute (NCELI), known as the River Institute. Three River Institute interns will be dedicated to the priority areas of EJ for the summer of 2003.

Action for Boston Community Development (ABCD)
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances, Air Quality, Community Resiliency

Through the project ABCD and Health Care For All (HCFA) will coordinate educational outreach on housing and health concerns through radio and community television programs, and by partnering with other community-based organizations, like the Haitian Multi-Service Center and Vida Urbana/City Life, to distribute information. To further promote environmental justice education, ABCD and HCFA will also organize a community forum made up of key community-based organizations, health agencies, environmental organizations, immigrant advocacy groups, and immigrant media outlets. Forum participants will be trained to take leadership in identifying contamination sources in their neighborhoods, knowing the current laws that protect communities and how to report violations, and working in a coalition with local environmental justice and health access groups in addressing toxic waste and clean air.

Chelsea Human Services Collaborative
Year: 2001
Air Quality

The Green Space project will address the severe truck traffic problem that is a major contributor to the soaring asthma and respiratory illnesses in Chelsea. The Green Space project plans to involve 750 people in its traffic reduction campaign by organizing its members, staff, volunteers and youth crew, and by recruiting new members. Green Space will then accomplish the following: (1) compile quantifiable data on truck traffic in Chelsea by doing research and conducting traffic counts and surveys, (2) determine air quality and the quantity of diesel exhaust through monitoring, (3) educate community members about the health hazards of diesel exhaust through a series of workshops, (4) highlight the project research at a community forum, (5) initiate roundtable discussions to develop a plan to reduce truck traffic, and (6) finally seek support from the City Council and City Manager for the plan.

The Food Project
Year: 2001
Farming and Fishing

In 2001 The Food Project’s youth, staff, and community members will work through their urban agriculture program and capacity-building initiatives to: (1) Educate peer organizations and participants at local and regional conferences about the connections between healthy food, healthy land, and healthy communities; (2) Launch the second year of a public media campaign that focuses on the value of a sustainable local food system; (3) Develop further business partnerships to increase awareness of, and support for, safe local food systems; (4) Utilize an organic agriculture lot as a tool for neighborhood environmental education about sustainable agriculture; (5) Increase organic food production on its lot by 30 percent; (6) Coordinate a youth-led National Action day to link 20 like-minded organizations in the U.S. to carry out a set of simultaneous community service activities organized by youth.

Nuestra Comunidad Development Corp.
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

The goal of the Swiftly Auto Mall Environmental Education and Prototype Project is to demonstrate that the auto service industry can be both environmentally-friendly and economically viable. The purposes of the project are (1) to implement an environmental education program to teach best practices and pollution prevention to auto repair mechanics, and (2) to create an analysis of the effectiveness of the program to generate change in business practices and to determine the value of replicating the program. The project will allow auto mechanics in the Roxbury and surrounding areas to understand relevant environmental laws, how to comply with the laws, and how to go beyond compliance and be both environmentally-friendly and economically viable.

Campaign to Protect Chinatown
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

Funding will help the Campaign to Protect Chinatown to provide environmental education about the immediate and long-term effects of pollution and construction to Chinatown residents. Through workshops conducted in Chinese dialects, the Campaign to Protect Chinatown wants to arm residents with the tools to actively participate in public meetings and make evaluations on the impacts of development in their community.

Nuestras Raices, Inc.
Year: 2000 
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The purpose of this project is to educate the Holyoke community, primarily consisting of Puerto Ricans, about the environmental health issues related to asthma and lead. Nuestras Raices wants to recruit four young adults from the youth that are participating in their gardening programs. These four young adults will receive interactive and bilingual training three hours a week for 12 weeks. The training will teach them about basic environmental sciences, leadership skills, environmental assessment methods, and GIS mapping. The four young adults will conduct research, surveys, and community forums to assess the concern of the community.

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Michigan

Huron Pines
Year: 2018
Water Quality Improvements

Huron Pines seeks to create coastal community collaborations between rural towns on the Lake Huron shoreline in order to develop and implement water quality improvements in the area.  The small, rural cities of Au Gres, Tawas, East Tawas, and Rogers City are disproportionately impacted by stormwater pollution and high unemployment.  This project will 1) identify environmental degradation issues due to stormwater runoff, 2) strategically plan and leverage funding to protect water quality in the long term, and 3) facilitate the creation of change from within to get these small, often competing cities to work together for the betterment of the Great Lakes and, in turn, the health of local residents.  Project outputs include: 3 high-level reviews of current stormwater data and ordinances of the area, 4 green infrastructure presentations by stakeholders to the regional community foundation, and a long-term study reflecting data on beach closures, water borne illnesses and water quality, 6 meetings between city officials and school leadership regarding the creation of a green infrastructure curriculum, and 4 Learning Days for Huron Pines staff and local city leaders.

Refugee Development Center
Year: 2017
Toxic Substances
This project seeks to reduce the high rates of lead exposure among refugee children in Lansing. Annually, two in three children who test for high blood-lead levels are refugees and live in rental properties in the city. This project will meet with a minimum of 75 refugees to assess their proficiency in identifying and mitigating lead paint hazards. Refugee Development Center will then develop print, web, and video materials to educate refugee families on home health hazards. Materials will be available in six refugee languages to reach a variety of populations. At least 50 refugee residents will pilot/test film, booklets, and web materials to be used subsequently in educational home visits.

Keep Growing Detroit
Year: 2015
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing
Healthy urban soils play a critical role in building communities that are food secure and environmentally resilient. This project will educate urban growers on the importance of soil and the preventive and precautionary measures of dealing with lead in soil and will demonstrate the positive impact that urban agriculture has on soil quality. Project goals are: 60 site visits, 135 soil samples, 352 yards of compost distributed, 50 raised bed gardens built, 10 workshops with 230 residents educated and 75 gardeners trained on the importance of soil testing, how to take a soil test, and how to interpret the results.

Southwest Detroit Environmental Vision Project
Year: 2014
Illegal Dumping, Pollution

This project seeks to address the adverse health effects of illegally dumped waste by safely cleaning up and repurposing at least two large dump sites in southwest Detroit where nearly one-third of families live below the poverty line. This clean up collaborative includes working with local residents, area businesses, schools, and non-profit organizations to improve living conditions and strengthen economic development. Together, the collaborative will identify large-scale dump sites, determine the potential for reusing and/or repurposing onsite material, and develop plans to redevelop cleaned sites into viable community green spaces. Residents will benefit from the availability of newly developed community spaces including gardens, pocket parks, and orchards.

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community
Year: 2013
Farming and Fishing
The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community Natural Resource Department will conduct a survey to determine fish consumption rates and practices by members of the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community who rely heavily on the consumption of fish for subsistence, economic and cultural needs. The research will focus on the most vulnerable members of the Keweenaw community including children, pregnant women, women of child bearing age and tribal elders. The survey results will be used to refine efforts to educate the community on how to reduce exposure to contaminated fish and help community leaders make informed, risk-based regulatory decisions to eliminate toxins in local waterways.

Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians
Year: 2012
Water Quality 
The Pokagon Band Department of Natural Resources, in partnership with the Pokagon Band Department of Education, will train tribal youth ages kindergarten through 12th grade on the cultural importance of water, water pollution, natural purification methods, and the current state of tribal waters. Students will also investigate the extent to which non-traditional practices have polluted tribal waters, monitor tribal water resources, and provide recommendations to the Tribal Council on the prevention, reduction, and elimination of pollution in tribal water. Kindergarten – 6th graders will investigate the importance of clean water to humans, fish, and wildlife and will educate the community through artwork on the causes, effects, prevention, and elimination of water pollution.

Southwest Detroit Environmental Vision
Year: 2010
Air Quality, Water Quality
This project will conduct outreach to collect video testimonies from area residents and students on the disparate impacts of local truck traffic and the air and water quality impacts of the local wastewater treatment plant. This project will educate residents, students and the business community on the impacts of truck traffic and diesel emissions in the community and available diesel emissions reductions programs. This project will conduct one-on-one visits to eight local truck companies who have fleets to educate them on emissions reduction, anti-idling and partnership opportunities. This project will take significant steps toward seeking mitigations through raising community awareness and extending beyond to begin overall regional awareness. This project will seek to build support from residents, the City of Detroit and the business community for diesel retrofits, anti-idling education and in the longer term a broad-scale diesel retrofit program for our border region trucks. This project will be taking necessary steps toward mitigations, which can eventually lead to reductions in carbon emissions and a positive impact on climate change.

Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice
Year: 2010
Community Resiliency
This project will address local climate change impacts through community outreach and education. This project will address local climate change impacts utilizing the Community Hazards Awareness Training Workshop (CHATS) model. This project will conduct two Community Hazards Awareness Workshop training sessions reaching a total of 400 community residents.

Kent County Health Department
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances, Air Quality
This project will train ten community members to perform radon testing and Integrated Pest Management assessment and remediation techniques to local low-income residents. This project will alleviate pest issues in at least 60 target area residences, achieving a reduction in observed insects and rodents, pest evidence, reduction or elimination of over the counter pesticides, and reduction in asthma symptoms.

Cedar Tree Institute
Year: 2003
Air Quality, Water Quality
The Institute will coordinate environmental education and coalition-building for Native American Tribes, faith communities, and project partners. This project will: (1) raise awareness about regional mercury impacts (air/water) from municipal and commercial coal-fired electric power facilities including local impacts from interstate air emissions trading, long-range transport and a local Great Lakes Area of Concern (Deer Lake); (2) initiate a community “burn barrel” education program emphasizing the environmental impacts and human health risks associated with dioxins and backyard burning; (3) provide information about the protection and restoration of Lake Superior. The project will have an emphasis on environmental sustainability through individual and community stakeholder actions.

Detroit Summer
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances

This project will (1) increase public awareness of the hidden toxins in homes and gardens and encourage the use of alternative methods of waste disposal, cleaning, and maintaining homes; (2) increase the skills of youth in neighborhood organizing, soil testing and methods of reclamation; (3) increase skills of youth in creating a toxic free home environment for mothers and children.

City of Flint, City Hall
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

This organization will plan and implement an Environmental Summit which (1) addresses how information regarding environmental issues, particularly cleanups and permitting, are made available to minority and low-income communities; (2) provides an overview of various environmental statutes; (3) provides a primer in public participation and how to effectively provide public comment; (4) discusses ways a citizen can participate in the environmental permitting process; (5) provides information on environmental careers.

Southeast Michigan Coalition on Occupational Safety and Health
Year: 2000
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

The Southeast Michigan Coalition will implement a Community Needs Assessment project that will develop assessment tools so that outreach activities in the predominantly African-American and Hispanic communities in Southeast Detroit can be more efficiently targeted. The Community Needs Assessment project will result in a better understanding of the needs of the Southeast Detroit community around childhood lead poisoning that will direct outreach efforts. The project will develop instruments to identify and prioritize environmental health needs and pilot the tools in the community.

Community Resource Development
Year: 2000
Water Quality, Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

High school age youths in the impoverished rural community located in Antrim County will have the opportunity to research existing scientific data and issues related to the release of hazardous substance from the Tar Lake Superfund site and environs and how the releases affect brownfield redevelopment. The youths will then develop and implement a plan to educate key groups throughout the County. The project will include the completion of a composite map depicting major ground water contaminant plumes, of a video depicting the historical perspective of industry in Antrim County, and of an environmental justice and brownfields redevelopment educational training program that can be presented to community groups throughout the County. A web page will also be created to serve as an information source for the community and a marketing tool for brownfields.

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Minnesota

Red Lake Band of Ojibwe Indians
Year: 2011
Water Quality, Community Resiliency 

The “Well and Septic Inventory” project will identify unsafe drinking water and address failing septic systems on the Red Lake Reservation.” The project will develop an inventory of wells and septic systems on the Red Lake Reservation to assist in repairs of failing systems and educate tribal members about proper maintenance. The goal is to identify water that is unsafe to drink and address the imminent health threats of failing septic systems. The tribe will inventory and assess 60 wells and septic systems, educate 200 tribal members on proper septic and well maintenance, provide quantifiable analysis of drinking water quality, and complete well decommissioning of up to 50 failing wells.

Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

This project will educate and build the capacity of local communities of color in the Twin Cities area to address climate justice and health issues. This project will establish a network of community groups to educate the community about these complex issues, train community leaders to provide community workshops on energy conservation and efficiency and develop and disseminate culturally appropriate educational materials on climate related health issues. The objectives of this project include: (1) increase awareness of how to achieve and maintain a healthy, energy efficient home; (2) reducing greenhouse gas emissions and home energy costs; (3) improving household energy safety; and (4) reducing chronic health conditions.

Women’s Environmental Institute at Amador Hill
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

Providing education and outreach to the community on: GIS maps of toxic pollutants in the affected area, the impacts of perfluorochemicals on the community, and asthma triggers and asthma intervention strategies. The project will also collect and disseminate preliminary scientific information on toxic exposures from industrial pollutants. Additionally, soil and food basket samples will be collected and sent for laboratory analysis and the results will be shared with the communities in culturally appropriate formats.

Independent School District 196
Year: 2001
Farming and Fishing

This project is designed to empower and coordinate grassroots community efforts to begin addressing problems related to the degradation of wild rice habitats on Red Lake Reservation. This project will develop and use a traditional Anishinabe-based model of community participation to involve the Red Lake community members in identifying critical wild rice sites and generating community awareness to the decline of wild rice.

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Mississippi

Mississippi Conference of Black Mayors
Year: 2014
Lead, Water Quality

The “Mississippi Delta Child Lead Reduction Plan” aims to reduce lead exposure and mitigate the negative impacts of old, inadequate housing stock for low-income, minority families and children throughout the Mississippi Delta. This project will create a network of African American mayors, health care providers, and community members who will be tasked with increasing community awareness and education about the harmful effects of lead exposure, common sources of household sources of lead, and preventative techniques. This collaborative effort seeks to develop and implement a “Lead Contamination Action Plan” that will help to identify the homes that have significant exposures, work with area health care facilities to test children’s toys and clothing for lead residue, and develop and implement lead abatement measures.

Caffee, Caffee & Associates Public Health
Year: 2013
Air Quality

The Mississippi Environmental Justice Advocates (MEJA) Project seeks to reduce asthma rates attributable to secondhand smoke by educating communities about the damaging health effects of secondhand smoke as an in-door pollutant and encourage residents to eliminate secondhand smoke from their homes and cars. Through a series of outreach activities including partnerships with area faith-based organizations, residents will be empowered to make behavioral changes that will help to eliminate pollution, decrease incidences of asthma, improve living conditions and increase environmental stewardship.

Legacy Village, Inc.,
Year: 2012
Water Quality, Air Quality

Legacy Village seeks to organize, educate and build capacity among Cary and Rolling Fork residents and property owners, helping them to identify and address potentially harmful contaminants found in drinking water, homes, and air. The project addresses these concerns in a two-phase approach that incorporates community education and research to address environmental vulnerabilities and health risks among residents. Activities include community forums, neighborhood outreach, networking with faith-based organizations and data collection and analysis.

Picayune Carver Culture Museum, Inc.
Year: 2004
Community Resiliency, Toxic Substances, Water Quality

The project will conduct a health survey to determine if there is a pattern or prevalence of any one type of disease or illness resulting from the Picayune Wood Treating, Inc. Superfund Site. The Picayune Wood Treating, Inc. Site was found to have contaminated soils and waterways with creosote on and near a community where 100% of the residents are African-Americans and low-income. Moreover, the project will conduct a historical assessment of the area to identify any additional contaminants present on the site of the Picayune Wood Treating, Inc. The impact of the project will be measured by the number of individuals surveyed, the health condition of those surveyed, the potential health hazards associated with known contaminants, any new contaminants identified, and the number of households receiving environmental information. The project will document all information and record risks or hazards identified. The information will be shared with the community through public forums, small group setting and a final report. The project will train community residents to become a part of the industrial environmental process. They will be taught that appropriate effective involvement will reduce and/or eliminate exposure to contaminants.

Center for Environmental & Economic Justice, Inc.
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances

The state has recently had a wake-up call, as it relates to lead paint and the mandate to eliminate the problem of lead poisoning. The Center will develop a workable plan of lead abatement from homes found with lead during surveys. The project will recruit community stakeholders to work with the lead project to actually conduct lead surveys and provide training to conduct lead abatement in their homes.

Center for Environmental and Economic Justice
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

The purpose of this project is to develop and strengthen the ability of the targeted community to participate effectively in environmental issues that impact their lives and engage in decision making at the Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) by participating in the Restoration Advisory Board meetings. Herbicide Orange Dioxin is being stored in drums at various sites on the NCBC. These drums begin to leak toxins onto the ground and into the water passage. The grantee will initiate independent study and scientific testing of water and sediment in the migration area.

Mississippi 20/20 Network, Inc.
Year: 2001
Water Quality, Air Quality, Toxic Substances

The purpose of this project is the creation of a student-driven process that will make campuses a model of health and safety. The project will also, motivate students to becoming “organizers” of health and safety in their homes and neighborhoods. The project will focus on the five worst environmental threats to children’s health (lead, air pollution, pesticide, tobacco smoke and drinking water contamination).

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Missouri

Kansas City Community Gardens
Year: 2017
Air Quality, Water Quality; Toxic Substances

The Giving Grove project aims for community partners and neighborhood leaders from low-income communities in the urban core of Kansas City to establish 15-20 community orchards on repurposed vacant land. After these orchards reach maturity they have the potential to produce an average of 3,758 pounds of fresh, organic produce per site, for a total of 56,000-75,000 pounds of food on an annual basis. Kansas City Community Gardens aims to improve soil quality, safely repurpose vacant lands, and provide a sustainable alternative to large-scale food production, thereby reducing the use of toxic pesticides in the food supply.

Dutchtown South Community Corporation (DSCC)
Year: 2016
Illegal Dumping and Proper Waste Disposal

The goals of the “So Fresh, So Clean, So Creative, Southside St. Louis” project are to increase public awareness of solutions to solid waste issues and build community capacity to address and enact system-level changes in regard to the amount of litter, improper waste disposal, and illegal dumping in the community. Key project activities include: 1) a localized neighborhood-level Sanitation Systems review; 2) multiple neighborhood cleanup demonstrations and development of recycling educational programs for residents; 3) workshops for landlords and tenants about sustainable materials management for rental housing; and 4) consultations for developing a self-sustaining waste diversion program to leverage resources and create green jobs in historically underprivileged areas of St. Louis.

Trailnet, Inc.
Year: 2014
Green Infrastructure, Pollution

Through its “Green Streets for Everyone” project, Trailnet aims to increase the creation of low-stress, green bicycle and pedestrian pathways as an effective way to help the city of St. Louis improve its watershed management, reduce water and air pollution, increase physical activity in underserved communities, and reduce asthma rates. To achieve these goals, Trailnet will partner with residents, local government, business leaders and universities to create an extensive community engagement plan including technical workshops to help residents understand how infrastructure impacts their health and well-being. Trailnet and its partners will also develop a detailed scope of work to help the city of St. Louis plan, design, and construct easily accessible, and safe bicycle and walking routes.

Black Health Care Coalition
Year: 2013
Air Quality

Through a series of community based workshops, project partners will be utilized to teach parents how to identify and mitigate household asthma triggers and to effectively communicate with area healthcare providers. The Black Health Care Coalition proposes to reduce environmental factors that contribute to childhood asthma triggers in the urban core of Kansas City, Kansas and Kansas City, Missouri. The Coalition will partner with local schools, community centers and faith based institutions to conduct community outreach efforts aimed at educating families of children diagnosed with asthma.

Trailnet, Inc.
Year: 2013
Water Quality, Air Quality

Trailnet will teach residents in three St. Louis neighborhoods how to prevent and reduce pollution, help with watershed management, and reduce rates of obesity and asthma by advocating for a safe and inviting space for walking and biking. Trailnet seeks to create neighborhoods where walking, biking, and taking public transit is a way of life.

Migrant Farmworkers Project
Year: 2012
Solid Waste Disposal   

This project will improve the solid waste disposal practices of the local migrant and seasonal farmworker community in Lafayette County, Missouri and expand an existing aluminum recycling project. Through a series of classes, presentations and experiential learning, the community will learn about the effects of solid waste pollution and the action strategies, including recycling, to mitigate it. Problems associated with solid waste are poorly understood by residents and there is not currently a viable, adequate system for recycling.

Migrant Farmworkers Project
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal, Air Quality

The Migrant Farm workers Project will address public health issues facing migrant and seasonal farm workers in Lafayette County. This project will train local farm workers to educate their community about public health issues that affect migrant and seasonal farm workers, adults and children in Lafayette County, Missouri. The project seeks to increase awareness about the safe handling of agricultural chemicals, the disposal, reuse and recycling of solid waste, and the prevention, detection and treatment of lead poisoning. Farm workers will also learn how to communicate and respond to emergency weather advisories and about the effects of air pollution, such as childhood asthma.

Howardville Community Betterment Committee
Year: 2011
Water Quality, Community Resiliency

The West Hermondale Stormwater Runoff & Drainage Improvement Project will address community infrastructure needs in an effort to prevent flooding. This project will address storm water runoff and flooding by assessing infrastructure needs the West End Hermondale community. The project seeks to build community partnerships and the funding needed to improve runoff of storm water drainage to prevent flooding. The recipient will disseminate information on the Safe Drinking Water Act, distribute EPA educational materials and develop a survey with a pre and post test to help determine the effectiveness of its community outreach efforts.

Grace Hill
Year: 2010
Solid Waste Disposal, Community Resiliency

The goal of the project is to protect Branch Street, the only remaining street in North St. Louis that connects to the Mississippi River, from being closed off from recreational use. Branch Street serves to facilitate healthy activities, ecological education, and helps improve public health. The project will conduct educational workshops for community leaders focused on public and environmental health issues and organize community bike rides to build awareness about the value of the street. The project will also encourage local business facilities to recycle materials by distributing a self assessment tool to help analyze their waste streams and will work to develop relationships with at least four of the local facilities which operate in the community.

Migrant Farm Workers
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

This project will address climate change issues and public health issues that affect the community of migrant and seasonal farmworker adults and children in Lafayette County, western Missouri. The goals of the project are to increase awareness about the dangers of sun and heat exposure, the key words and symbols related to weather advisories broadcast via television, telephone, or in person, and the dangers of lead poisoning and poisoning prevention strategies, including how to evaluate toys and find out about toy recalls. This project also seeks to decrease in pesticide related health issues in migrant populations.

Kamen’s Angels, Inc.
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

The goal of this project is to engage young people from the neighborhood in the process of revitalization by recruiting homeowners to apply for energy audits and home weatherization through existing programs. Neighborhood youth will also receive training through mentorship in home weatherization as well as home renovation and energy efficiency retrofitting. The idea is to foster community involvement with youth, while at the same time, increasing neighborhood energy efficiency and decreasing the cost associated with outdate and drafty homes.

St. Louis Lead Prevention Coalition
Year: 2010
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

The goal of this project is to provide education and resource materials to low-income families in St. Louis, MO, designed to enable them to address common household issues found in older, lower cost housing stock and maintain a healthy home environment by addressing the hazards of lead, mold/mildew, poor indoor air quality, and insects/rodents.

Legal Aid of Western Missouri
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances

Reducing the risk of lead poisoning from house paint, lead-containing toys, and other sources and. The recipient will also increase environmental literacy and meaningful involvement by facilitating sessions “Planeta Para Todos,” to help migrant families to develop a more comprehensive understanding while empowering them to practice preventative measures.

Metropolitan Energy Center, Inc.
Year: 2008/ 2009
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

Providing residential energy efficiency and environmental health workshops and training to the community. The project seeks to increase the awareness of home related energy and environmental problems through the training of community residents with limited English speaking proficiency who wish to become involved in the housing industry dealing with energy efficiency and environmental health issues in residential structures.

Area Resources for Community and Healthy Services
Year: 2007
Air Quality

The identified issue for this project is toxic exposure of residents in their homes and from small businesses located in the affected community. The environmental and/or public health result the community hopes to achieve is the reduction in exposure to toxics. ARCHS will achieve this goal by: (1) creating a public/private partnership led by the City of St. Louis to create a regular pick-up service for household hazardous waste; (2) educating residents on the use of less toxic alternatives and the proper handling and disposal techniques for household hazardous waste; and (3) working with businesses adopt pollution prevention mechanisms.

Black Health Care Coalition, Inc.
Year: 2006/ 2007
Community Resiliency, Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The overall purpose of the proposed project of the Black Health Care Coalition (BHCC) is to provide a community based approach to educating high risk communities about potential environmental health hazards for children, identify those who need additional services and refer them accordingly. One focus of health education will address child exposure to lead. The second population to be targeted is families of children who have asthma. The BHCC plans to: organize interested parties to work in partnership to reduce lead poisoning among high risk children and lessen environmental (home) triggers for asthma.

Stoddard County Development Foundation
Year: 2006/ 2007
Water Quality, Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

SCDF will present meaningful health and environmental education programs to the residents of Penermon in order to make well-informed decisions regarding the benefits of clean water, solid waste management and control of vermin. This project intends to effectively reduce the incidence and spread of chronic and vectorborne diseases and conditions, such as asthma, West Nile Virus and encephalitis, through public education campaigns and community participation programs to promote trash reduction, reduce burning of refuse, recycling and reuse, as well as promotion of better wastewater practices through studies of improved management techniques and technologies.

Ivanhoe Neighborhood Council
Year: 2005
Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

The Council will provide outdoor trash containers, dumpsters, organize tire pickups and organized block clean ups through partnerships to reduce the amount of hazardous waste/toxic substances. Expected results of the project are: a reduction in the amount of improperly disposed trash; an increase number of residents who use dumpsters or clean ups; an increase in the number of residents who recycle; and collected data to show benefits of trash containers in high traffic areas. Partners include Keep Kansas City Beautiful; the City of Kansas City; Missouri and the University of Missouri, Kansas City.

Howardville Community Betterment
Year: 2005
Water Quality, Air Quality

Howardville Community Betterment will develop and implement a safe drinking water campaign in the community by addressing the causes and effects of respiratory (asthma) related illnesses through information collection, workshops and demonstrations to aid in prevention and control of air pollution. Expected results would be a reduction in the number of asthma cases and an increased number of families knowledgeable about air and water quality. Partners include Missouri Bootheel Healthy Start; Missouri Stream Team 31617 - Howardville; and Southeast Missouri Hospital.

Mid-America Regional Council Community Services Corporation (MARC) 
Year: 2005
Air Quality

Urban Air Pollution Inequities MARC will characterize the spatial concentrations of ground level ozone and evaluate the degree of differential exposure among urban and suburban communities. The project will continue work with community members to reduce ozone precursors, promote air quality awareness, and meet federal attainment standards. MARC will also extend partnerships to included more researchers in Kansas City and expand research to include respiratory illness, pollen, and particulate matter. Partnering in this project is the University of Missouri Kansas City Center for the City and Laboratory for Climate Analysis and Modeling.

Area Resources for Community and Human Services (ARCHS)
Year: 2003
Air Quality, Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The primary purpose of this project is to support the involvement of community residents in developing strategies for neighborhood-based pollution prevention projects. This project focuses on air and water quality improvements by helping residents conduct research, receive training, and coordinate public awareness. The objectives of the project include: (1) increasing residents and business participation in developing strategies to address solid waste reduction, pollution prevention, recycling, and (2) develop strategies to address air and water quality issues.

Madison County Health Department
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances

The plan is to continue the Madison County Environmental Roundtable as a forum of communicating with the local residents, to educate the residents about safe remediation of hazards, such as lead-based paint, and to decrease the apathy about the lead hazards in the mining community, thereby assuring all can live, work, and play safely in a healthy environment. The affected communities are rural communities near old lead mining sites. The residents in these communities are not aware of, nor are they involved in the decisions made regarding the cleanup of the sites and the associated health issues.

Douglas County Health Department
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency

This project is designed to increase communication and coordination in the community about environmental issues related to the nearby Superfund site.

Ozark Mountain Center for Environmental Education
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Air Quality, Water Quality

This project will environmentally educate communities whose water, air, land and health are impacted through lead mining and milling/smelting processes.

Clinton County Health Department
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing, Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality

“Clinton County Environmental Health Project” - This project will educate local citizens about groundwater contamination resulting from solid waste disposal on farmland.

Boat People S.O.S., Inc.
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

“Health and Environmental Risks Awareness Project” (HERAP) seeks to empower the disadvantaged population of Vietnamese refugees, through the following activities: - Raise awareness about the health risks associated with carbon monoxide and lead; - Identify and assess pollution sources of carbon monoxide and lead; and -Recruit and train environmental and health advocates for the community.

Metropolitan Energy Center
Year: 2001
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

This project will improve the quality of life for low income residents living in energy inefficient homes within the Kansas City urban core area. It will inform and educate urban core residents about energy efficiency management. Energy efficiency in the home has a direct correlation with afford ability and often with the families’ health. Recent increases of more than 40% in energy prices have placed a great burden on low income residents. The targeted neighborhoods are located between Troost and Prospect in Kansas City, MO’s urban core area. The results of this project are envisioned to be transferable to almost any at-risk community in the Kansas City metropolitan area, the region and the United States.

Barton County Environmental Health Services
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

This project is a dual component educational program to address lead poisoning with respect to low-income families (with small children), landlords, Realtors, renovation contractors, and master gardeners. The first component targets low-income families with children between 6 months and 6 years of age. It is designed to provide educational materials on hazards of lead ingestion, food planning, and demonstrations of lead cleaning/testing techniques. The second component will consist of a series of specialized lead training sessions for at-risk groups.

Junior College District of the Mineral Area, MO
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

This project will address the need for the operation of the Madison County Environmental Roundtable that functions as a public policy group dedicated to education, open communication, and community problem solving. This target community is one of old, lower cost housing located near mine wastes that continue to expose residents to tailings and contamination. This project will also work with the development of a power point computer presentation module to advance knowledge for churches, civic groups, and execute at least eight targeted presentations at local group meetings. The project is a necessary, valuable and inexpensive way to implement some proven methods of community involvement in detached rural mining areas that have socioeconomic and educational barriers.

Operation SafeStreet
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

This project focuses on broadening the communities’ focus to work on ways to fully integrate environmental justice issues in environmental planning solutions. Stakeholder partnerships have emerged to address air pollution, abandoned buildings, solid waste, lead in the environment to lack of green and recreational space to the lack of environmental information. The problem exists that these initiatives disproportionately impact low-income and communities of color. The goal is to have a community-based and environmental justice issue work cooperatively where they exist.

St. Louis Medical Waste Incinerator Group (St. Louis MWIG)
Year: 2001
Air Quality

This project targets residents living near the incinerator. The demographics of this area are low income, less formal education, 50% White and 50% Black. This project will train a core of neighborhood outreach leaders in the science and law of medical incineration, environmental networking, and grass-roots organizing. These leaders will lead MWIG to new partnerships. These partnerships will be with the producers of the medial waster burn off toxins. These new partnerships will enable the community to tackle other environmental injustice issues.

Bridging the Gap
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The grant will create the Environmental Justice Outreach Coalition, comprised of environmental education and health organizations providing resources to minority and low-income communities. The program Bridging The Gap aims to increase educational outreach about EJ issues in disadvantaged communities through partnerships with existing organizations. The Coalition will develop an interactive, culturally sensitive and educationally appropriate anchor display to educate residents in targeted communities about environmental and related health issues. This display along with other individual displays of other Coalition organizations will attend local neighborhood events, fairs, and festivals in targeted neighborhoods.

Operation Safe Street, Inc.
Year: 2000
Solid Waste Disposal

The Team Sweep Environmental Education (TSEE) Phase II seeks to assist targeted communities, identify sources of pollution and implement recycling and recycling and reducing programs as strategies for environmental improvements. Intervention strategies being planned range from litter and trash removal to curbside recycling to permanent community collection points. Based on the early responses and success achieved in year one of the TSEE pilot project, TSEE Phase II anticipates greater inclusion of racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups as environmental stakeholders.

Wyman Center, Inc.
Year: 2000
Job Training

The Wyman Center Field Science Academy’s goal is for up to 100 fourth and fifth grade at-risk students from the Senn-Thoms Middle School in Jefferson Co., MO to attend science camps while they learn about the inter-relatedness and interdependency of the environment, science, society, and themselves. Hands-on activities connected by math-and science-based curriculum will foster learning and personal growth and development. Students participate on a voluntary basis. The majority of these students come from poverty stricken single-parent households. This camp-like project would teach environmental awareness and responsibility at an early formative age.

Children’s Mercy Hospital
Year: 2000
Air Quality

The Home Evaluation Program for the Prevention of Allergy and Asthma is a program designed to address the increasing rates of asthma and allergy patients within the targeted community. Three participants of the Children’s Mercy Summer Youth Program will be supervised and trained to identify, analyzed and remediate indoor environmental contaminants in their community.

D.R.E.A.M Center Partners
Year: 2000
Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality

The purpose of this program is to educate and empower adult basic education students and neighborhood residents regarding environmental and economic issues in which they participate either as consumers and/or contributors. The program aims to address the long-standing community problems of litter, improper trash disposal, ground water pollution, illegal dumping and general lack of knowledge for environmental stewardship at the neighborhood grassroots level. Target audience for this project consists of two overlapping groups: Adult Basic Education Students with a minimum age of sixteen years; residents of the 49/63 Neighborhood Coalition; and Blue Hills Neighborhoods.

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Montana

Blackfeet Tribe
Year: 2017
Water Quality

The Blackfeet Nation will undertake a baseline monitoring study using eDNA testing techniques to determine the presence/absence of invasive mussels in Tribal waters. Invasive mussels can greatly reduce the levels of life-supporting algae blooms in local waters, thusly harming native fish populations. Waters in the Missouri River System in the State of Montana have been declared positive for invasive mussels. The Blackfeet Nation proposes to analyze 150 water samples from 5 bodies of water to determine if Tribal waters have been contaminated by the fouled waters in the Missouri system. Approximately 40 citizen scientists from the local community will be trained in substrate collection and water monitoring activities as a part of the project.

Crow Tribe of Indians
Year: 2013
Water Quality

The Tribe’s proposed Water Quality Education Program will establish a sustainable approach for addressing the adverse health effects associated with water pollution and educate the community on preventative measures to mitigate the effects of contamination. The Crow Tribe of Indians seeks to address fecal contamination issues at a sacred, medicinal spring located on the Crow Reservation. Although the spring is culturally significant to the Crow Tribe and is used for recreational and ceremonial practices, it poses a significant threat to the health and safety of tribal members.

Libby Public Schools
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

This project has two purposes: 1) Identify, educate and track those individuals who attended Libby schools contaminated by asbestos. This will provide a mechanism whereby these individuals and their families will be informed about the potential health consequences of their exposure, send them information in the future, and include them in any medical initiatives regarding asbestos that are developed, including both research into the effects of childhood exposure to asbestos and programs to provide health care or health care assistance. 2) Protect current Libby school children from future exposure to asbestos. The school system is an excellent conduit for providing information to children and their families about the dangers of exposure to asbestos. This is important because of the pervasive use of vermiculite from the mine for household uses, including insulation and garden conditioning.

Fort Belknap Indian Community
Year: 2001
Water Quality, Air Quality

The Tribal Environmental Protection Program proposes to safeguard surface, ground and drinking water sources under the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act by participating in Technical Work Group meetings with BLM, MDEQ, and EPA during/after the Zortman and Landusky Mine Reclamation SEIS process. In addition, the Program proposes to protect air and water resources under the CWA and CAA by participating in the military Target Range for the Montana Air National Guard EIS process. Based on this participation and interaction with federal agencies, the Tribe will become knowledgeable about the issues so they can educate members through news articles, meetings, training seminars and passive educational materials which will help them make informed decisions on these and other NEPA actions.

Eastern Plains Resource Conservation and Development Area, Inc.
Year: 2001
Water Quality

This grant will provide public information and capacity building for the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Municipal and Rural Water Supply System and Dry Prairie Rural Water (DPRW) Authority in northeastern Montana. The central issues address the serious health and quality of life concerns related to the very poor quality of existing ground water sources that provide drinking water for municipal and rural residents of northeastern Montana. This rural area project area has a population of 24,000 people, which includes 12,000 members of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. Another objective is to raise public awareness regarding contaminated ground water aquifers and sources that contribute to the contamination.

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Nebraska

Together Incorporated of Metropolitan Omaha
Year: 2015
Toxic Substances

Through this project, Together Inc. of Metropolitan Omaha will partner with the Omaha Healthy Kids Alliance to improve the quality of the indoor environment of Together Inc.’s clients. The purpose of this project is to: (1) provide "Healthy Home Assessments" for Environmental Hazards in at least 125 homes of families with children under the age of 12; (2) offer education to residents about Healthy Homes through in-person trainings and distribution of educational materials; (3) provide Healthy Homes education to Together staff; and (4) collect data on the costs for upgrading homes of residents and create a business plan for continued work to address healthy homes concerns.

Nebraska Families Collaborative (NFC)
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

The project will identify and reduce the incidents of lead poisoning in foster homes by implementing a three pronged approach: 1) “Healthy Home Assessments” will be offered to 445 foster families residing in four high lead concentration zip code areas;  2) environmental hazards education will be offered to 130 staff in nine foster care agencies, 220 NFC staff, and 1,379 foster homes where NFC case manages children; and 3) environmental hazards education will be offered to families in the general community who reside in the four high lead-level concentration zip code areas, as well as, other families residing in low income, underserved communities in Douglas and Sarpy Counties who may be at high risk for environmental hazards. Over 200 children are poisoned by lead in Omaha each year as a result of interior lead-based paint hazards. Families will be educated on problems in their homes and provided information and referrals for services through the Omaha Healthy Kid Alliance.

Public Health Solutions (PHS) District Health Department
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances

Increasing the accessibility to blood lead level testing and lead information for parents of young children, and to increase the lead safety of at risk houses. It will improve the overall health and safety of roughly 4,000 children in the rural five- county health district served by PHS. Lead poisoning awareness and prevention is a vital component of environmental and public health that has historically lacked resources and attention in this region.

Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Home
Year: 2008/ 2009
Community Resiliency

Training staff from the Boys’ Town pediatrics clinic on how to screen patients to identify environmental concerns adversely affecting their health. They will learn how to make appropriate referrals, and work collaboratively to address their patient’s health and environmental concerns. Families served by this clinic will receive information on how to assess services to improve their home environments, as well as, resources and materials to foster relationships with medical and legal professionals to address their concerns.

Sisters Together, Inc. Omaha Chapter
Year: 2005
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The project will collect data to determine the present level of residents’ knowledge of lead and asthma and present the findings to the community decision makers in an effort to work toward a reduction in lead poisoning and asthma in the community. In collaboration with the Urban League of Nebraska and other grass root communities, this will address Clean Air Act and Toxic Substance Act education areas due to the high incidence of lead poisoning and asthma in the eastern portion of Omaha.

Chicano Awareness Center
Year: 2004
Toxic Substances

The purpose of this project is to complete a community research assessment. The research will collect data on multiple sources, risk factors, and prevention strategies for lead poisoning. The project will gather baseline data on knowledge & awareness of multiple sources, risk factors, and lead prevention and determine the preferred method of information dissemination. A model for health information transfer will be developed that can serve as a model for similar communities.

Central Nebraska Community Services, Inc.
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Air Quality, Water Quality

The goal of this project is to inform and educate 100 persons in the effected communities, on the environmental hazards of radon in the air, and Coliform bacteria, lead and nitrates in the water. The project director will regularly attend quarterly Health Services Advisory committee meetings. They will also test 20 private rural water wells for the existence and levels of coliform bacteria, lead and nitrates Radon remediation will be provided in five homes that have radon levels tested at or about 10.0 pCi/L

Lead Safe Omaha Coalition
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances

The purpose of this project is to inform and educate the community in the Omaha/Douglas County area about the dangers of hazardous substances, lead poisoning, and environmental hazards. The goals of the project include: (1) providing 15 lead paint inspections/assessments; (2) referring families in need of lead-based paint related services to the appropriate organizations for assistance; (3) holding five home-based daycare providers’ workshops on lead hazards, and (4) expanding the scientific knowledge and understanding about hazardous substances through various communication mechanisms such as public television, a speakers’ bureau, and website information.

Omaha Tribe of Nebraska
Year: 2002
Solid Waste Disposal

This project will focus on support of the Tribal Recycling Program as part of the comprehensive solid waste management plan. The project will include staff training, ensuring markets for collected materials, and general administrative development of the program.

Nebraska Health & Human Services
Year: 2000
Air Quality, Water Quality, Toxic Substances

This project will educate and promote healthy living through source reduction and through enhancement of the environment by protecting air, water, and land from the effects of mercury contamination. This mercury collection program will encompass the entire state, however will focus on the Nebraska Indian Tribes, including the Omaha, Ponca, Santee Sioux and Winebago Tribes.

Omaha Tribe of Nebraska
Year: 2000
Solid Waste, Toxic Substances

The purpose of this project is to continue the Omaha Tribe’s initiative to increase the education and awareness of household hazardous waste through training on the Omaha Tribal Reservation.

Washington County C2000 Partnership
Year: 2000
Solid Waste Disposal

The Safe Handling of Waste-Managed Environmentally community group will examine alternative waste disposal techniques and alleviate negative social, economic and environmental impacts of leaking landfills on the citizens in Washington County.

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Nevada

Sierra Nevada Journeys
Year: 2017
Water Quality

Sierra Nevada Journeys seeks to protect the local watershed in Washoe County by engaging students from underserved communities. The focus of the program will be galvanizing youth to address polluted drinking water, groundwater threats, and water conservation, all explored through the lens of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education. The project aims to engage approximately 648 students, 72 volunteers, and 24 teachers who will receive first-hand experience with their local watershed and participate in hands-on activities and discussions to increase their understanding about the environmental issues that affect their community.

Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency
 
Pyramid Lake Paiute is going to develop Environmental Education program for the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation. Three communities (Sutcliffe, Nixon, and Wadsworth, Nevada) within the reservation are the focus groups. Within each community, schoolchildren will be the targeted group for most of the educational program activities and tasks. Children, ages 10-13 years, will serve as the “educators” after being educated by the program. The youth will educate their families and the community on the issues that they learned through alternative educational activities, such as presentations and a youth group (4-H group). A 4-H group focusing on these issues will be formed and called “Enviro-Friendly Home Economics”. This group will serve as the education liaison for the community and their families.

Shoshone-Paiute Tribe of Duck Valley
Year: 2001
Farming and Fishing, Water Quality

The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of Duck Valley Reservation project will address environmental justice issues stemming from the abandoned Rio Tinto Mine that impacts the reservation. Over the last 20 years the tribe has become increasing alarmed that prior mining activities in a drain that feeds into the East Fork of Owyhee River (Mill Creek), are causing more than occasional fish kills. The Shoshone Paiute has documented impacts on the Owyhee fishery and impacts to the watershed date back to the active mining and milling initiatives especially during WWII and the mid-70's. This project will consist of three research tasks: (1) collect and analyze impacted Mill Creek surface water of the Owyhee River; (2) collect and analyze native fish in vicinity of the impacted effluent discharges of the Owyhee River; (3) collect and analyze the willow roots, leaves, and stems from areas impacted and not impacted, to be used for a basis of comparison of exposure pathways. Data generated from this research and testing will be evaluated from a toxicological perspective for both human direct exposure and food chain accumulation through the fishery or willows that line the banks for the Owyhee River. The research will identify any concerns to the health and safety of the local population, recreationists, livestock and wildlife.

Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe
Year: 2000
Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The burning of trash results in environmental and health problems in the Fallon Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony. The residents living in the more densely populated areas of the colony and the three reservation subdvision make up over 65% of the entire reservation population. Half of these residents that live in these areas cannot afford a monthly disposal service. There has been numerous complaints of toxic smoke created by the burning activities. The goal of this project is to: (1) Educate the public of the hazards of burning trash in their yard. (2) Determine possible alternatives to the burning of trash and present recommendations to the Fallon Business council. The above goals will be met by gathering information from pre-existing data on burning trash and sharing it with the community. Recommendations on alternatives will examine recycling centers and other means of disposal.

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New Hampshire

The Way Home, Inc.
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The Way Home, Inc. will provide education to help tenants and property owners understand healthier alternatives for pest control and to reduce incidences of adverse health effects due to the mishandling of pesticides and pesticide residue. The project, which targets multi-family residential buildings, seeks to promote the safe use of household pesticides and healthy pesticide alternatives resulting in reduced exposure to pest infestations that may cause asthma in children and allergic reactions. The Way Home, Inc. will further its objectives by partnering with certified pest management professionals to establish a residential building inspection and monitoring system to detect household pests and train residents and property owners to safely use pest control products while providing comprehensive plans for long term pest control.

The Way Home, Inc.
Year: 2006/ 2007
Toxic Substances

The project will facilitate community education and outreach to assist in developing community and tenant advocacy groups and leadership to empower the members to participate in a meaningful way in the decisions and policies which affect their health. This project will raise awareness of lead poisoning, its health effects, causes, hazard identification, control, reporting and remediation as well as the tenant's rights and responsibilities in regards to safe affordable housing. The project will engage these stakeholder groups in a collaborative team to build the necessary levels of understanding and respect of each member's role and interest in creating Healthy Homes to protect the health of the community and a sustainable future for the neighborhoods and their residents.

The Way Home, Inc.
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances

Healthy Home Services Project - The Healthy Home Services Project goals and objectives are to build the Manchester, NH community’s capacity to expand the number of Environmentally Safe Housing units available to low income renters, with a focus on reopening, with appropriate renovations, units closed due to lead paint hazards. Objectives include to 1.0 Continue the 2001-02 EJ project’s task of identifying closed rental housing units that could be made lead safe for families with young children; 2) Build community support for stakeholder participation in the pilot lead abatement/rehab project that is being created by the 2001-02 EJ project through The Way Home’s Healthy Home Services program and its network of community partners; and 3) Evaluate results from the first six months of the 2002 pilot project and assist stakeholders with problem solving to identify barriers to reopening the closed units and to design alternative strategies for reopening/renting units as lead-safe housing for families.

The Way Home
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances, Air Quality, Community Resiliency

The purpose of The Way Home’s Community Organization for Environmentally Safe Housing project is to increase Manchester’s stock of affordable, lead-safe housing. The project goals are to (1) use a peer education process to reduce environmental hazards to children’s health in low-income housing, (2) influence landlords to reduce exposure to hazards in their older housing units and make safe housing available to needy families, (3) provide temporary lead-safe housing for families with lead burdened or at-risk children, (4) provide specialized cleaning to reduce lead dust and asthma triggers in the homes of low-income families with at-risk children, and (5) offer property owners low-cost methods to reduce lead hazards as primary prevention of lead poisoning. Through the project The Way Home specifically plans to map all of the housing units in Manchester that are in need of lead-safe renovations.

Keep Providence Beautiful/ Groundwork Providence
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency, Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality

The Environmental Education Outreach Project was designed to increase West End residents’ understanding of community environmental and public health problems and solutions by (1) identifying and assessing environmental risks and pollution sources in the community; (2) devising strategies for environmental improvements; and (3) providing education, information, and training on crucial environmental and public health issues, such as lead contamination, solid waste disposal, water pollution reduction, and recycling, among others. The project will first establish an Executive Committee of organization and resident stakeholders, and then use grassroots outreach to increase membership in partner neighborhood associations by 20 percent. Twelve environmental education workshops will later be held on topics that are most important to the West End community, printed informational brochures on the same 12 workshop topics will be published in English, Spanish, and Cambodian, two neighborhood cleanups will be organized, and a set of standards for community development projects will be developed to ensure that they are completed in an environmentally sensitive fashion.

The Way Home, Inc.
Year: 2000
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

Entitled Peer Education as a Model for Environmental Justice, the project will address the disproportionate levels of exposure to lead and asthma triggers in inner city Manchester. This project will provide home visits to low-income families to educate residents about environmental health issues. The education of landlords and the renovation of units will also occur. At community Coalition meetings, GIS formats will become a tool to further educate the community on the relationship of environmental hazards in the home and children’s health.

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New Jersey

Center for Family Services, Inc. (CFS)
Year: 2018
Illegal Dumping, Community Clean-up

CFS’ PowerCorps Camden, a program composed of teams of young leaders serving to address environmental challenges in the community, will work directly with the Camden Collaborative Initiative to plan and execute a demonstration project creating community engagement and utilization of Camden Reports, an active portal empowering the community to report illegal dumping.  In instances of illegal dumping reported to Camden Reports, the portal will alert the appropriate authorities and activate PowerCorps Camden members to undergo training and respond to those impacted areas.  Project activities include community events focused on illegal dumping education, school presentations to engage youth through projects, partner meetings, training for PowerCorps members, distribution of informational flyers and brochures on dumping, and the production of a marketing and advocacy campaign including PSAs and videos about Camden Reports and the hazards of illegal dumping.  Outputs and outcomes of the project include, but are not limited to, increased education of community residents, increased utilization of Camden Reports, an increase in the number of PowerCorps members trained, an increase in the number of students engaged in educational outreach and clean-up efforts addressing illegal dumping, and an increase in the number of community events disseminating public information about illegal dumping and instruction on Camden Reports; all done in an effort to keep Camden beautiful, safe, and clean.

Coopers Ferry Partnership (CFP)
Year: 2017
Water Quality

CFP will accelerate the restoration of local water systems by increasing riparian and urban forests, and connecting both adult and youth residents to water-related health activities in the local area. Stormwater flows and combined sewer overflows will be abated through the tree planting efforts, reducing both human pathogens in these water systems and the broad suite of environmental contaminants that harm these environments. Proposed project activities include: three tree groves of approximately 30 moderately-mature trees to be planted in riparian and floodplain open space, and two community tours of the natural aquatic habitats benefitting from the green infrastructure and the riparian restoration efforts of the community.

Ironbound Community Corporation
Year: 2013
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing, Air Quality

This project will educate residents about strategies used in reducing toxic substances in soils while teaching them innovative approaches for soil restoration to help foster sustainable urban gardening and green infrastructure. Ironbound Community Corp. seeks to transform two vacant, under-utilized lots into community green spaces that will serve to educate, improve air quality and enhance the quality of life for residents of the Ironbound neighborhood in Newark, New Jersey. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute to greening their community by learning to build raised beds, plant and maintain trees, and construct and operate composting bins.

Ironbound Community Corporation
Year: 2011
Farming and Fishing

ICC greening, gardening and educating the community. ICC will create a community learning garden with greening activities for residents of all ages. The project will grow existing gardening efforts at the East Ferry Street Family Success Center (EFSFSC), add new sustainability elements such as a rain harvesting system, and will link all greening and gardening activities to education components that engage and empower residents to create healthier more sustainable places where they live, work, learn and play. The project targets children active in the after school program, families at the EFSFSC, and all interested residents from the local community.

Comité de Apoyo a los Trabajadores Agrícolas (CATA)
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

CATA helping to reduce exposure to pesticides for southern New Jersey farm workers. The project will educate and train migrant farm workers in Southern New Jersey about the risks of pesticide exposure. Southern New Jersey has an increased indigenous migrant population from the states of Oaxaca and Chiapas in Mexico and the northern areas of Guatemala. This project will assist newer farm workers in implementing protection standards in the workplace and identify training needs to enhance protection in the fields and camps where they live.

Lazos America Unida, Inc.
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing, Solid Waste Disposal

Educating community members of New Brunswick, New Jersey concerning the risks associated with lead exposure, and demonstrating methods for safe gardening practices to avoid lead poisoning. The organization will survey area residents to determine: the extent of backyard gardening usage; what residents are currently growing; whether existing backyard garden plots have had soil testing, and what residents already know about lead in soil, and other sustainable gardening practices. The results of the survey will be used to create a safe backyard gardening manual, which will be complimented by offering training workshops for residents. In addition, the organization will educate residents on ways to reduce solid waste, with an emphasis on the composting of household kitchen scraps and yard waste, to help sustain a long-term success in the community.

Heart of Camden, Inc.
Year: 2008/ 2009
Air Quality, Community Resiliency, Toxic Substances

Studying and identifying the environmental and public health issues in Camden City, NJ. Specifically, it will develop a comprehensive environmental health information tool, consisting of emissions data, contaminated soil sites, the status of pending air pollution mitigation and site remediation effort data. A description of known and potential health effects, related to the identified pollutants will be developed. In addition, the project will analyze and compare the hospital utilization rates of Waterfront and South-Central Camden community members (i.e., for respiratory and cardiovascular disease) to other urban and suburban New Jersey communities.

Green Faith
Year: 2008/ 2009
Air Quality

Studying air monitoring efforts and truck route identification related to operations at Port Newark, NJ. Toxic releases from this area will be identified by community youth and adult residents. The recipient will perform broad-based outreach and education on the results of these efforts to a range of Newark community and faith-based organizations. An Environmental Health and Justice Tour will be conducted for Newark residents. The project will provide the foundation for a long-range, comprehensive "greening" of Port Newark.

Isles, Inc.
Year: 2004
Toxic Substances

Isles, Inc. is seeking to improve housing conditions by partnering with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), School of Public Health and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI). The partnership will research and report the extent of multiple exposures of contaminants found in the older housing stock in the City of Trenton, New Jersey. The information collected will be used to encourage home repairs by landlords, changes in household cleaning and maintenance practices, and improved local code enforcement utilizing “healthy home” principles. Isles will increase community capacity to address this problem by training community members to collect dust samples (metals, pesticides, lead) from 75 homes. The samples will be analyzed by the laboratories of EOHSI and to serve as healthy home counselors. Isles will communicate these results to occupants, community and faith-based groups, city officials, landlords and similarly situated communities outside Trenton, NJ to raise awareness of findings, and to encourage changes as indicated by the data. Also, the project may assist toward identifying dangerous levels of toxins before children or other vulnerable residents are harmed or adversely affected.

Tri-County Community Action Agency, Inc.
Year: 2002

Toxic Substances, Water Quality
The Bridgeton Lead-Safe Housing Initiative will address the need in the City of Bridgeton, Cumberland County, New Jersey, for awareness of lead hazard in household dust and water. The project will include: testing resident homes for lead in water and household dust; providing lead poisoning prevention education; providing participants with lead home cleaning kits; and training each participating household to identify families at-risk of lead exposure. To this end, participating household will be challenged to locate at least one additional at-risk family and refer them to the Bridgeton Lead-Safe Home Initiative.

Citizen Policy and Education Fund
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

The project is to involve community members on a campaign to educate tenants on the dangers of lead poisoning and how to sample their dwellings for lead dust, lead hazards, and, when applicable, lead in their water. The results will be used to enforce disclosure and abatement laws and persuade landlords to make the appropriate repairs to these premises. Landlords will be made aware of reduced-rate financing programs available to them as well as grant opportunities from the local municipality. In particular the project will: educate community leaders, property owners, and tenants about the sources and effects of lead poisoning on children and the community as a whole; facilitate communication between those responsible for complying with the law,; empower community members to sample their homes; and assist property owners to overcome financial barriers to abatement by making them aware of low cost, economical loans, and available financial assistance from private and public sectors. The City of Newark, New Jersey will be the target area for this project.

Boat People SOS, Inc.
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

Through a series of outreach activities including information workshops, radio talk shows, and monthly newsletters Boat People SOS aims to build community capacity and enhance community understanding of lead paint hazards faced in Camden homes. This Virginia-based organization is targeting Vietnamese refugees in Camden, New Jersey.

Rutgers, The State University
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The Community University Consortium for Regional Environmental Justice at Rutgers University-Newark will expand its community-based risk-mapping program within their partner communities. The grant monies will be used to develop a formal training program and manual on how to develop and to use community-specific risk-maps and to develop an automated method of linking community-designed base maps to a full range of Web-GIS data.

Greater Newark Conservancy
Year: 2000
Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The Newark Recycling Outreach Project will address the environmental justice issue of recycling in the city of Newark, NJ. The Greater Newark Conservancy will work with local community groups to increase the recycling rate in a target community in Newark’s Central Ward. One hundred percent of the City’s residential non-bulk waste eventually goes to an incinerator that is located in Newark’s East Ward. This is significant because Newark already has a serious air pollution problem, and the incinerator emissions may contribute to elevated levels of asthma for City residents. Higher recycling rates will lead directly to a reduction in residential solid waste, which can help stem the air pollution problem at the local level. This project will act as a model that can be replicated in other parts of Newark.

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New Mexico

Amigos Bravos
Year: 2018
Water Sampling and Monitoring Project

Amigos Bravos will work in the rural area of the Taos Valley to address water contamination of the Rio Fernando de Taos.  E. coli contamination impairs the entire length of the river and has disproportionately impacted the people of Taos as the water quality has continued to diminish over the years.  Year one of the proposed project will focus on determining detailed sources of the on-going E. coli contamination on the Rio Fernando de Taos.  While there is much speculation about the sources primarily responsible for high E. coli levels in the Rio Fernando, studies have yet to positively identify the main contributors.  The Rio Fernando de Taos Revitalization Collaborative proposes to conduct a microbial source tracking (MST) study in which bacteria genotyping technology will be used to identify the animal group source (human, cattle, dog, beaver, etc.) of bacteria in river water samples.  By identifying and focusing resources on the most significant bacteria sources, the Collaborative will be better equipped to plan projects that achieve measurable reductions of E. coli in the river.  During year 2 of the project Amigos Bravos will focus on: hiring a watershed group coordinator to organize the group and coordinate its activities, field trips and watershed education activities and trainings for collaborative members and the public, conducting outreach activities, such as the creation of an outreach plan and information materials, and conducting public meetings to establish broad-based, diverse membership.

Pueblo of Sandia

Year: 2017
Water Quality

Sandia Pueblo camps seek to address surface water impairment on the 19 Pueblo reservations by providing water quality monitoring trainings and improving educational outcomes for tribal youth. Of the 19 Pueblos, 17 have impaired surface waters flowing onto the reservation. Sandia Pueblo will implement culturally responsive 2-day science camps for up to 250 students that include lessons on water monitoring techniques, the scientific method, and stream ecology. The camps will use an engaging outdoor-based curriculum and extensive community involvement to expose students to career options in STEM disciplines.

Friends of Valle de Oro
Year: 2015
Water Quality

Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) is the Southwest's first urban refuge. A major known problem for the Refuge and the Mountain View neighborhood is stormwater impacts that have long plagued the South Valley. The Refuge will be used as part of a plan to manage stormwater under a new pilot watershed-based MS4 (Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System) permit and a new project of the Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority (AMAFCA) to install stormwater management facilities in the South Valley, including use of the Refuge for end-point collection and treatment. This project will inform that process using various tools, primarily canvassing and outreach to community leaders, to achieve four goals: research baseline community understanding and awareness of the Refuge and the National Wildlife Refuge System; Create marketing materials and host community events to raise awareness of the Refuge; and its development and encourage community participation; Identify community needs and issues and ways the Refuge can support these needs; Identify potential negative environmental and economic impacts of the development of the Refuge and formulate recommendations to minimize or eliminate such impacts.

TEWA Women United
Year: 2015
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

The project will educate tribal and rural communities in Northern New Mexico to understand environmental and public health issues related to one of our most vital resources – water. Project activities seek to educate the residents about local strategies to maintain clean and safe water supplies by demonstrating how traditional dry land farming techniques can be combined with contemporary strategies to improve water use efficiency. The project, developed by community members, is a collaborative effort between local schools, organizations and government. Tewa Women United has partnered with the City of Española for an Edible Food Forest terrace garden project. Specific project goals are: 1) Demonstrate wise use of water and water harvesting; 2) Educate our community on sustainable gardening methods.

Zuni Youth Enrichment Project
Year: 2013
Solid Waste Disposal, Air Quality, Water Quality

The Zuni Youth Enrichment Project will sponsor a youth development program designed to educate Zuni youth about the importance of environmental stewardship from a Native American perspective. Youth participants will become “Ambassadors for Change” by initiating recycling efforts within their households and continuing this effort by reaching out to their community at large. Youth participants will host a series of discussions on topics such as waste disposal, recycling, and reduction of solid wastes on the local Tribal radio station. Students will also learn about efforts to protect native lands, air and water through hands on interactive sessions with the Zuni Department of Natural Resources including training in water testing and excursions to ecologically important points on the Reservation.

Ben Archer Health Center
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

The Breathe Easy project will provide pesticide training to farmworkers and their families. Through home-based, personalized health education, the project’s goal is to minimize exposure of pesticides, allergens and asthma triggers in Luna County, a rural community, populated by predominantly Spanish-only speaking residents. The Breathe Easy Project will educate farmworkers on pesticide safety in the work place and help them understand how to limit exposure of pesticides to their families.

Chimayo Conservation Corps (CCC)
Year: 2012
Air Quality, Water Quality

Chimayo Conservation Corps (CCC) will conduct a series of workshops to address local environmental and public health concerns associated with impaired water quality. The workshops will focus on ways to reduce sediment from accelerated erosion entering the local streams and the solid waste dumping into the dry washes. The workshops will be held in the Lower Embudo Valley which includes a number of small villages, largely of Hispanic heritage and will feature site tours and presentations focusing on public education. The project will leverage existing community networks and local partnerships to establish a local waste and pollution action team. The project targets community awareness and education on small erosion control techniques, reducing solid waste, and litter in the community.

Border Environmental Health Coalition
Year: 2011
Water Quality

The Border Environmental Health Coalition advocates for safe drinking water and improved sanitation for Colonias residents. This project develops advocacy training for residents of Fort Hancock who seek to improve their drinking water and sewer/wastewater situations. Colonias residents bear a significantly higher income-cost ratio for obtaining safe drinking. Teaching Colonias residents to effectively advocate is one of the most effective ways to address environmental justice issues associated with unsafe drinking water and sewer systems.

Earth Works Institute
Year: 2010
Water Quality

Educate/empower youth and young adults in collaborative efforts to create clean and safe outdoor spaces, such as city drainage systems, trails and park areas through their employment, development of educational outreach media and installation of storm water infiltration gardens. The project will also use art and educational signage as community education tools and green jobs training hubs in economically challenged neighborhoods surrounding Santa Fe High School and the nearby Arroyo de los Chamisos. Santa Fe High School (SFHS) students will be trained as stewardship ambassadors to conduct educational outreach in low-income communities, neighboring areas where storm water demonstration and signage projects are being developed. Institute of American Indian Arts students will mentor and coach SFHS students and will provide artistic expertise to develop and implement murals, curb stencils and interpretive signage to educate community members, reduce pollution and increase stewardship activities around the school and the adjoining arroyos (dry creek).

Connections
Year: 2010
Farming and Fishing, Job Training

Season extension through hoop house utilization in McKinley County. We plan to make the continued growth and consumption of fresh produce as accessible as possible in an area that has one of the highest poverty rates in the country. These efforts will serve to increase sustainable green jobs in our area through education and community producer to producer networks. Project will take an organic approach to sustainable agricultures thereby minimizing chemical risks and promoting education about the harmful effects of pesticides. Focus on shortening the food transportation chain so as to cut carbon emissions and reduce green house gases produced by way of long distance transportation.

Gila Resources Information Project
Year: 2010
Job Training, Renewables and Energy Efficiency 

This project proposes to build capacity for green jobs training and education benefiting high school students in environmental justice communities in New Mexico that will equip those students with the knowledge, skills and abilities to compete for employment in the growing green jobs sector. Green workforce development in communities with environmental justice concerns is critical to ensuring that all New Mexicans are well prepared for the existing as well as the thousands of estimated future clean energy jobs. Students will receive classroom-based as well as hand-on training in the areas of energy efficiency and weatherization, renewable energy technologies, water conservation, home safety, automotive retrofitting, as well as workplace readiness and success skills. The curriculum will be piloted at Aldo Leopold Charter High School in Grant County, and then disseminated for use at the secondary school level throughout New Mexico. This project will directly benefit low-income high school students in Grant County and statewide by providing pathways out of poverty through green jobs training and education. By providing green jobs opportunities, education and training, doors to employment and social and environmental justice will be opened to those who face high rates of unemployment and underemployment and potential disproportionate impacts from climate change in New Mexico. A trained green jobs workforce in New Mexico will support state entities in their efforts to develop clean energy and green industries and to meet the labor needs of the estimated 235,000 new green jobs expected in New Mexico by 2020.

Mountain View Neighborhood Association
Year: 2008/ 2009
Air Quality, Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal

Addressing the increasing tensions related to environmental issues between Mountain View residents and government staffers through community outreach and education. The goals of this project include: developing air quality permitting documents in understandable language to make it easier for the residents to comprehend, and educating the residents and businesses on how to properly dispose of hazardous waste and the impact it has on the environment.

American Indian Law Center
Year: 2008/ 2009
Community Resiliency

Providing information on state permitting processes and environmental justice to New Mexico tribal communities, tribal leaders and others. The project will publish workshop materials that describe environmental and natural resources extraction permitting processes. It will also educate New Mexico tribes regarding environmental justice concepts. The information will be disseminated at workshops held in tribal communities throughout the state.

Doña Ana County Colonias Development Council
Year: 2006/ 2007
Toxic Substances, Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The Colonias Development Council (CDC) intends to develop the Colonia Environmental Action Initiative to address the community’s exposure to toxic materials and contaminated groundwater due to the presence of several landfills and industrial entities located in or near the communities. Through this initiative, CDC and its partners will work with the large colonia communities of Sunland Park and Chaparral to: (1) build community knowledge and capacity to effectively assess and monitor present and potential community environmental hazards; (2) develop leadership capacity among the residents and support them in the formation of “Comités de Vigilancia”; and (3) create a partnership forum that brings together major stakeholders (community –based groups, Public health, New Mexico Environment Department, New Mexico State University) to exchange data and work plans to monitor ongoing potential hazards and address existing contamination.

Dona Ana County Colonia Development Council
Year: 2003
Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

This grassroots organization will be developing and implementing a train-the-trainer and community organizing initiative to increase community capacity to respond to threats of importing waste from outside the state to landfills in their neighborhoods. The aim of the initiative is to educate Colonia residents in Las Cruces, who are primarily Hispanics, about environmental issues facing their communities. The project also seeks to help the community develop the skills to address these concerns through critical thinking, problem solving, active participation and engaging in the political system. The training component of the initiative is a train-the-trainer effort designed to teach Colonia residents to: (1) identify potential environmental exposures and hazards involving air, water, solid waste and toxins in their communities; (2) access information about environmental conditions in their communities; (3) engage the political system to promote environmentally safe policies and to address unsatisfactory environmental condition in their communities and (4) take action to prevent environmental exposure to toxins and waste due to unhealthy community practices as outlined in the New Mexico Department of Health Strategic Plan.

La Cienega Valley Citizens for Environmental Safeguards
Year: 2003
Water Quality, Toxic Substances

Hazardous contaminants threaten the water supply of communities downstream and downwind from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and residents, primarily Native American and Hispanic, in the region, are not well informed of the problem. The goal of this research project is to develop an independent survey of the communities surrounding LANL. The survey will assess and evaluate the perception of the community about the effects and risks to human health from hazardous substances. The survey will also help identify their perceptions as to the presence of hazardous substances in the water and air near Santa Fe. The research project is being conducted to assess the knowledge and understanding of the community residents about the contaminants affecting the communities. The results of the survey will help enable the community to focus on the public health and socioeconomic issues affecting their community.

Sawmill Advisory Council
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

The Sawmill Advisory Council in Albuquerque is a nonprofit organization that seeks to address a gamut of long-standing environmental issues. The community of Sawmill/Wells Park neighborhoods currently suffers, and has historically suffered, from environmental health risks and hazards (i.e., toxins and poor water quality). The community is insufficiently involved in decision-making processes and believes that they are bearing disproportionately high and adverse effects from the negative environmental consequences resulting from industrial and commercial operations near their homes. This project seeks to expand effective, community-based, community-driven capacity by: (1) stakeholder mapping; (2) training leaders to access public health information systems and public environmental data and (3) establishing a community oversight committee to disseminate health and environmental information. The oversight committee will also guide the designing and implementation of advocacy dialogues with all accountable City and State environmental policy making organizations.

Community Networking Resources, Inc.
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency

This project’s purpose is to educate communities and EJ organizations on ways to use new technologies in assessing environmental hazards in the community and to close the “digital divide” that exists today. Low-income communities lack resources to have computers, and thus, don’t have access to the Internet. This is a serious impediment to furthering the work of EJ organizations. Seven of the Southwest Network for Economic and Environment Justice (SNEEJ) organizations will participate and a representative of each will be sent to the trainings. Basic computer skills will be taught to EJ activists and will establish the groundwork for a network of community based/grassroots border organizations to learn to use Geographic Information System (GIS) technology. The training will build technology capacity and will increase the effectiveness of SNEEJ affiliates to conduct their work. Target: Seven SNEEJ affiliates and the low-income residents in the communities represented by these affiliates (low-income, people of color communities).

Cambio, Inc.
Year: 2001
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

This project aims to expand the Wilderness Training with a structured plan of recruitment and follow-up. Both rural and urban youth will be included and will be taught to collect and test water and soil samples, to identify sources of pollution, and to establish baselines. The training will focus on youth leadership, environmental justice youth education and recruitment, threats to the communities’ water supplies, and unlawful solid waste disposal. The project will then empower young people to deal with these issues by forming an environmental justice caucus. The young people will work with their peers to identify problems in their own communities and will then work with adult environmental networks to address those problems. A Tierra Norteña Wilderness Training Handbook and a one-page fact sheet will be produced as an outcome of the training. The materials will be used for future training in the environment and environmental justice principles.

Bernalillo County Environmental Health Department (BCEHD)
Year: 2001
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The Pajarito Mesa/Bernalillo County Alliance will facilitate four community-based meetings to educate residents on safe drinking water, disposal of solid wastes and county policies. Trainthe-trainer programs will then be conducted, with the assistance of BCEHD and SWOP, to further educate the residents on these and additional topics. A project coordinator, hired from the community and a team of community communicators will be recruited to conduct training of the other residents. Community cleanups will be coordinated biannually in an attempt to ensure safe disposal of solid wastes. Improved spirit of cooperation between the residents, the County, BCEHD and SWOP, as well as the residents’ increased understanding of environmental issues and ability to organize and work together around those issues, are expected outcomes of this grant.

Rocky Mountain Youth Corps (RMYC)
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Renewables and Energy Efficiency

The purpose of this project, “Cascading Leadership: Youth Led Indoor Air Quality Training & Demonstration at Taos Pueblo” is to improve indoor air quality in an early childhood school at the Taos Pueblo as a pilot demonstration project. As the youth are trained, they will train and empower community members to correct unhealthy situations in their homes, schools and work places. This project will improve awareness about the causes and effects of indoor air pollution, identify measures that should be taken to address this issue and existing community resources available to assist in this effort. RMYC will test for radon, lead, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, proper ventilation and energy efficiency. Approximately five hundred parents and children who attend the school will participate in the project. The families’ homes will be tested and properly weatherized and participate in the public demonstration. The project will result in improved air quality and energy efficiency in the demonstration project school, which means less risk of lung cancer, asthma, and other health problems. The community members will be educated about indoor air pollutants and methods to improve air quality. Finally, the corps members will be trained in indoor air quality assessment and weatherization, providing them with marketable skills and improved self esteem.

Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The ENIPC is a consortium of eight pueblos in northern New Mexico. ENIPC ENV has established a community environmental-awareness program, illuminating environmental health issues. ENIPC ENV wants to expand the outreach to address environmental justice concerns by investigating the relationship between environmental justice and health. The finding will be communicated to the tribal communities. The purpose of the project is to enhance the understanding of environmental and health issues, to encourage greater public participation, and to promote the information-gathering process. A document will be produced incorporating the issues. Future research needs will identify and include a research program for students. An overview of environmental statutes will be provided.

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New York

Fifth Avenue Committee
Year: 2017
Air Quality, Water Quality

Fifth Avenue Committee will develop and promote an EJ Curriculum for public housing residents in Red Hook and Gowanus, Brooklyn. Topics covered will include indoor and outdoor air quality concerns, as well as the health and management of local waterways. The targeted housing developments are home to nearly 10,500 residents living in over 4,700 units dealing with a wide range of disproportionate environmental harms including poor air and water quality. The curriculum will be presented in Spanish and English. The project will foster resident engagement by providing them with tools and opportunities to educate others, organize, and participate in public processes for a cleaner and safer environment. The proposed final curriculum will include up to 8 workshops for 15-25 community participants each.

People United for Sustainable Housing, Inc. (PUSH)
Year: 2016
Green Infrastructure (GI) Implementation through GI Worker Development

This is a two-part educational project that will 1) prepare local, underserved communities impacted by water pollution to address local water quality issues and 2) support job readiness in the green infrastructure (GI) and environmental restoration sectors. The project will produce a cadre of qualified workers and contractors for work in the GI and restoration sectors throughout the Buffalo River Watershed through an organized series of multi-faceted educational training workshops. Community residents participating in the workshops will be trained as natural habitat stewards with valuable environmental stewardship and maintenance knowledge, including the skills and abilities to support the many restoration efforts currently underway and being planned for the Buffalo River watershed. The workshops will also educate residents about how to be community leaders in affecting positive change in the City of Buffalo. The project brings together a diverse group of partners who are working to contribute to making the Buffalo River Watershed a more sustainable and livable community for all and supports the development of trainees to become well-versed community leaders.

Rocking the Boat
Year: 2017
Water Quality

High School students from the underserved neighborhoods of the South Bronx will monitor pathogens at six sites spanning the Bronx River over the course of a year. Rocking the Boat proposes to increase youth capacity in the STEM-related job sector through development of this water monitoring program. Throughout the year, students will present monitoring results, findings, and conclusions at 5 community outreach events that typically reach 600 community residents each. The Bronx River Alliance, Rocking the Boat’s project partner, will make all water monitoring data publicly available through their online database of Bronx River water quality, as well as the EPA’s STORET database.

Council on the Environment, Inc (GrowNYC)
Year: 2015
Water Quality

GrowNYC aims to install rainwater harvesting systems for the purpose of capturing storm water that flows off rooftops to reduce flooding and storm water flow entering the sewer systems. Through this project, GrowNYC will train and educate a team of area youth to install, repair and maintain green infrastructure in local community gardens located in the Harlem section of Manhattan. Also, GrowNYC will educate community residents through workshops, GrowNYC’s online Green Infrastructure toolkit and on-site educational signage paired with visible green infrastructure projects in public spaces (community gardens).

Friends of Van Cortlandt Park
Year: 2015
Water Quality

The Friends of Van Cortlandt Park “Wetland Stewardship for a Healthier Bronx Watershed” project will reduce the amount of water that flows from Van Cortlandt Lake and Tibbetts Brook into the sewer, thus reducing sewer overflow into the rivers during heavy storm water events. A combination of classroom study, hands-on participatory group work, and outdoor service projects will stimulate eager students to become involved in planting, invasive plant removal, and other activities that will decrease the storm water runoff from entering the Harlem River and East River watersheds.

Easter Queens Alliance (EQA)
Year: 2015
Air Quality

This project seeks to engage community residents in the development and implementation of a plan to reduce exposure to the emissions from the operation of JFK airport and airport-related sources that could affect the health of the residents living adjacent to JFK airport. Eastern Queens Alliance will conduct air monitoring sampling to assess the extent of air quality and its effect on the community in proximity to the airport. In addition, EQA will perform community outreach and education about environmental harms and risks related to the emissions.

St. Regis Mohawk Tribe
Year: 2013
Air Quality

The St. Regis Mohawk Tribe Air Quality Program plans to implement a clean air intervention project that will educate the Akwesasne tribal community to reduce exposure to indoor environmental asthma triggers. An indoor air quality expert will conduct an air quality audit of each home and help participants select mitigation strategies tailored to reduce exposures to toxins including radon, mold, household chemicals and smoke. Participants will receive continued real-time monitoring to evaluate the impact of these strategies as well as follow-up visits to assess the program’s success, answer questions, and provide support in making life changes that promote healthy indoor air.

Green Guerillas
Year: 2013
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances, Water Quality

Through its Youth Tillers Program, Green Guerillas seeks to recruit and train a team of area youth to work on composting, rainwater harvesting and the reduction of pesticide use through organic gardening. Along with the Green Guerillas staff, Youth Tillers will work with 15 Bedford-Stuyvesant community gardens to expand current compost systems or install new systems to reduce solid plant waste and food scraps. Participants will also improve upon or install rainwater systems to help harvest hundreds of gallons of water to reduce runoff and sewer overflow. In turn, youth participants will educate area residents using hands-on demonstration techniques, educational materials and by conducting healthy gardening and cooking classes.

Clean Air Coalition of Western New York
Year: 2012
Air Quality 

The Clean Air Coalition of Western New York will educate community leaders in Buffalo about the adverse health impacts of freight transportation on communities closest to freight transport hubs. The project will build the capacity of local leaders to understand and advocate for solutions to reduce their community’s disproportionate exposure to diesel exhaust. This project also educates residents about the possible health risks from exposure to pollution associated with high freight traffic. Residents will learn how to take air samples and share air quality data with the broader community.

Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, Inc.
Year: 2012
Water Quality

Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, Inc., working closely with a broad range of partners, will lead a collaborative, community-based watershed planning and protection initiative focused on the urban watershed of the City of Peekskill, New York. These local bodies of water provide various uses for the community including subsistence fishing, swimming, and recreational uses. Through training, technical assistance and hands on activities, the community will develop the knowledge and tools to address the needs of the watershed and learn to become actively involved in government decision making. Residents will also learn about environmental hazards and health risks associated with polluted local waterways. The project will foster youth involvement through the creation of an Urban Watershed Steward program, promoting peer-to-peer learning, neighborhood cleanup projects and sustainability.

Onondaga Environmental Institute, Inc.
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

Onondaga Environmental Institute‘s (OEI) project seeks to address elevated blood lead levels and high asthma rates affecting low-income, minority residents in Syracuse, New York.

This initiative will educate residents about the dangers of living in unhealthy homes and provide residents with available corrective actions. The primary vehicle for raising public awareness will be four community meetings in economically stressed neighborhoods with high incidences of lead poisoning, asthma hospitalization and pre-1978 housing stock. Residents will receive training on the dangers of toxic substances such as lead, asbestos, radon and mold which may be present in residents’ homes. The project will also offer OSHA and EPA certification training to under-employed and unemployed city residents seeking employment opportunities in the building and construction trades.

Rockaway Waterfront Alliance (RWA)
Year: 2011
Water Quality

RWA launches yearlong habitat wetland restoration youth training program. RWA seeks to train 15 low-income high school and middle school students about the environmental justice issues plaguing the waterfront. The “Rockaway Youth Marine Conservation Corps,” an intensive, yearlong marine debris removal training and habitat wetland restoration program aims to cultivate a new generation of environmental stewards. Students will learn marine debris removal and oyster gardening and participate in wetland restoration along the Sommerville and Norton/Conch Basins. Students will also design and implement projects that educate and involve their schools and community in the cleanup and restoration of the Jamaica Bay.

Onondaga Environmental Institute
Year: 2011
Water Quality

High school students learning to be environmental stewards in Syracuse, NY. This project will educate high school students in Syracuse, NY, about protecting water resources and fostering environmental justice. Onondaga Environmental Institute will help students gain an understanding of the various pollutants and contaminants that affect their health and ecosystems. The lessons will be inquiry-based and will encourage active learning, helping students gain the knowledge, inspiration, and skills needed to use existing laws and policies to foster environmental justice. “Onondaga” will partner with Orenda Springs, an experiential learning center, to provide students with hands on experience and the communications and leadership skills required to become future environmental stewards.

West Harlem Environmental Action, Inc. (WE ACT)
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances

WE ACT to conduct research identifying lead sources in northern Manhattan and the South Bronx. The project seeks to expand scientific knowledge on best practices for the detection of lead poisoning hazards in households in Northern Manhattan and South Bronx. WE ACT will conduct research identifying exposures to lead from dust particles in the home, public drinking water systems and consumer products. WE ACT will communicate its findings to 600 residents of low-income communities of color and immigrants living in Northern Manhattan and the South Bronx. WE ACT will also conduct research designed to compare the efficacy of one-on-one tutorial versus DVD video instructional and outreach formats.

UPROSE, Inc.
Year: 2010
Water Quality, Air Quality

Educating and engaging the community residents of Sunset Park (Brooklyn, New York) around water quality, air quality and climate change issues. The project will measure and map local air pollutants for sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) using mobile air monitoring equipment. Also, the project will collaborate with students at the Sunset Park High School and local middle school on a project to test tap water and local waterways for contaminants such as lead, mercury, pesticides, bacteria and nitrates. The recipient will incorporate local climate change adaptation into the project discussion to help residents understand the relationship of their environment and the implication of a changing global climate on the natural resources (such as air and water).

Cypress Hills Local Development Corporation
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Air Quality, Water Quality, Job Training

Conducting energy audits and educating homeowners and renters located in the Cypress Hills area of Brooklyn, NY to increase their overall energy efficiency to make the Cypress Hills neighborhood a green, safe healthy and livable community. The recipient will investigate the air quality inside homes and survey residents regarding issues of air quality and respiratory health. Also, the applicant will educate homeowners on ways to reduce water usage in their homes via home energy retrofits and weatherization as well as educate residents on ways to reduce the amount of toxins released into the local water system by using non-toxic cleaning supplies and properly disposing of harmful materials. Furthermore, the project will assist young people from the neighborhood by offering green jobs training opportunities, thus providing participants with the skills to conduct home energy audits and basic weatherization.


Rocking the Boat, Inc.
Year: 2010
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal, Job Training

Educating apprentices on the causes, effects, prevention and reduction of water pollution in the Bronx River. Apprentices will learn data collection techniques and apply these in their sampling of the waterbody. Also, the apprentices will provide results to the New York City Department of Environmental Protection to assist the local agency in identifying areas (in the Bronx River and along the shoreline) whereby solid waste materials need to be removed for proper disposal. This job skills training program will teach volunteers the following: how to build and repair the organization’s boat fleet which is used to conduct the water monitoring sampling; prepare oyster habitats in the Bronx River; and assist with a reef enhancement project and monitor its effectiveness in slowing the rate of motion (subsidence) and compaction of the river bottom.

West Harlem Environmental Action, Inc.
Year: 2010
Community Resiliency, Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

Organizing stakeholders in Northern Manhattan, New York, to develop a community-based climate change readiness plan. The recipient will work with New York State and New York City agencies as well as local community members to develop a climate change readiness planning process that will address specific concerns in Northern Manhattan. Using collaborative problem solving techniques, the recipient will identify the local challenges posed by climate change (i.e., sea-level rise and extreme weather events) on this community through a survey and needs assessment, and in turn share this information and partner with government agencies to address the specific environmental and public health risks challenges associated with water quality protection, wastewater treatment, solid waste management, and coastal zone flooding.

Citizens’ Environmental Coalition
Year: 2010
Solid Waste Disposal, Air Quality


The purpose of this project is to increase community involvement and understanding of the environmental, health, and climate change aspects associated with landfills (with a special focus on air quality) so that citizens, students, teachers and community activists can contribute solutions on how to control, reduce or eliminate the threat of living with these hazards. The recipient will be educating and identifying the environmental, public health, and climate change issues associated with the Seneca Meadows Landfill in the City of Geneva, New York. The recipient will conduct air quality screening to monitor the fugitive emission gases from the landfill. The air monitoring study will be used to determine if the air quality near those residents surrounding the landfill are within national air quality standards. Furthermore, the applicant will educate residents on solid waste disposal practices and develop a waste management plan to reduce the landfill waste intake.

Hudson River Sloop Clearwater
Year: 2010
Water Quality, Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

This project seeks to increase knowledge of environmental and public health issues for residents located in Peekskill, Beacon, Poughkeepsie and Kingston. The recipient will conduct Climate Justice Assessments for each community, which will be developed by engaging residents on local water quality, air quality, solid waste management practices, toxic substances management, and pesticide applications, with an emphasis on climate change.

Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper
Year: 2010
Water Quality

The purpose of this project is to increase awareness for community residents in Buffalo and Niagara Falls, New York on the environmental harms and risks associated with their local waterways. The recipient will conduct water quality sampling and monitoring at the local waterways within the cities of Buffalo and Niagara Falls. Results will be used to help community residents find solutions to address the environmental problems facing their local waterways. Furthermore, the recipient will educate residents on the historical and current industrial toxins which have polluted these waterbodies and the harmful affect these contaminants have on local aquatic wildlife and recreational usage of the waterways. Volunteers from local high schools will assist in conducting outreach for this project.

South Street Seaport Museum
Year: 2010
Water Quality

Educating community residents in the Harlem section of Manhattan, New York on the environmental harms and risks associated with their local waterways. The recipient will educate community members on water pollution impacting their local river; how toxins (e.g., PCBs, Cadmium, Mercury, etc.) accumulate in the food chain; and the harmful effects the warming temperatures of the river, via climate change, impacts the local aquatic species and marine habitats.

Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

To prevent lead-paint poisoning through education and community outreach, and mitigate indoor environmental conditions that exacerbates asthma (e.g., rodent infestation and mold). The recipient will help the community to develop an understanding of environmental and public health issues by identifying 150 households at risk of environmental hazards, including lead poisoning, asthma exacerbation due to rodent infestation, and pesticide exposure, with an interest in developing strategies to remove those hazards. The recipient will educate the community both about the dangers of pesticide use to control vermin infestation as well as the benefits of integrated pest management. By educating residents on the importance of identifying these risks, and further take steps to remove them, the community will build local capacity for addressing household hazards.

Make the Road New York
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances

Conducting research and educating communities on the toxic risks of lead paint and pesticides. The research will identify the level of exposure to those risks and the reasons for that exposure (e.g., lack of knowledge, lack of alternatives, etc.). Residents will be educated on ways they can reduce their individual/household exposure, the dangers of lead paint poisoning and how to identify household toxics. The recipient will promote healthier alternatives, such as the use of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices as an alternative to toxic household pesticides.

Healthy Schools Network, Inc.
Year: 2008/ 2009
Air Quality

Engaging low-income communities and their schools in learning how to avoid asthma triggers, and empowering them to take action to reduce these triggers. The recipient will identify and select 15 communities from among six New York State counties, based on hospital discharge asthma-mapping data and student profiles from the NYS Departments of Health and Education, respectively. School officials will be identified, educational forums conducted (including webinars, meetings and interactive workshops) and local partnerships cultivated. Recommended actions will be provided to local schools and their communities for follow-up.

Southwest Area Neighborhood Association, Inc.
Year: 2007
Air Quality, Healthy Homes

The identified issue for this project is resident exposure to household hazards, namely lead, asthma triggers, and carbon monoxide. The environmental and/or public health result desired is the reduction in exposure of residents to these household hazards. SWAN will accomplish this goal by: (1) educating the residents on how to avoid household hazards and how to make personal changes to reduce exposure; (2) assisting residents on how to gain access to resources and services that address exposure to household hazards more effectively and efficiently; and (3) conducting follow-ups with the participants in the program and the resource providers to determine if changes in behavior occurred or if services were rendered.

Brooklyn Center for the Environment, Inc.
Year: 2006/ 2007
Water Quality, Air Quality

The project will establish a Youth Consortium to bring students together with community-based organizations to collectively address clean air and clean water issues in the community. The five primary goals of the project are: 1) engage students as an affected stakeholder group, 2) assess environmental health factors in the community, 3) inform the general public of clean air/clean water issues, and 4) build the capacity of collaborating community-base organizations to involve students in addressing clean air and clean water issues, and 5) propose an action plan that will effect change in the affected community. This project brings together community-based organizations and other organized stakeholder groups with high school students in the Williamsburg-Greenpoint area of Brooklyn, NY to address clean air and clear water issues in the community. The participants of the project will engage in hands-on activities to explore techniques and local resources available in monitoring their community’s environmental health.

West Harlem Environmental Action, Inc.
Year: 2006/ 2007
Toxic Substances

The project goal is for residents to transition from current pesticide use to safer alternatives in order to reduce negative health impact from pests and pesticide application in this community. The campaign will seek to address the issues through 3 major initiatives; 1) build a collaborative of Northern Manhattan residents and stakeholders who will both determine and ultimately implement the work that is to be done; 2) identify and fully define the specific problems related to garbage disposal, pests, rodents and pesticide use in the community; 3) empower the Northern Manhattan community through education , training, and outreach to both work towards the full identification of the problems and act as key players in the implementation of solutions.

West Harlem Environmental Action, Inc. (WEACT)
Year: 2005
Air Quality

WE ACT is an organization dedicated to empowering communities, as well as, improving the environmental health, protection and policy decisions which affect low-income, and/or communities of color. WEACT will provide training/workshops to the residents and communities of Northern Manhattan and South Bronx on potential harmful indoor air exposures and their associated environmental health effects to infants and children. The workshops will further educate the residents on available measures they can apply to reduce these potential environmental/ public health impacts. Partnering with WE ACT is the Columbia Children’s Center for Environmental Health (CCCEH).

Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation(BOEDC)
Year: 2005
Water Quality, Air Quality

BOEDC works with local residents and business owners to create green pathways throughout the Bronx. This project will study the control of storm water runoff, water quality, heat generation via the installation and data collected from the construction of a green roof. Green roofs consist of vegetation grown atop roofs. The green roof thus replaces a portion of the vegetated footprint that was destroyed when the building was originally constructed. By recovering green space, this project seeks to identify potential improvements in the quality and absorption rate of storm water runoff (thus reducing stagnant water sources for vermin and insects). In addition, the pilot will demonstrate the reduction in heat generation levels that in turn creates a public health benefit to those individuals sensitive to outdoor air quality levels (e.g., asthma) during the summer months in an urban setting. Partnering in this project is Green Roofs LLC.

Council on the Environment, Inc. (COTEI)
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

COTEI proposes to provide a pesticide education and action curriculum at Bronx Regional High School (Bronx, New York). A trained student organizer will devote an entire semester (32 weeks) to teaching two classes. Each class will learn about home and school pesticide use, their possible health effects and alternate methods of pest prevention or removal. Classes would then conduct outreach and education projects including: setting up educational tabling events, writing letters to the editors of local school newspapers, developing public service announcements (PSAs) for the radio; preparing a student research paper, fact sheets and poster board displays all of which would be presented at local environmental centers and other venues. The project will also include components to educate the custodians and other school personnel about the use of integrated pest management (IPM) in preventing and removing pests; the parents about safe methods of eliminating cockroaches to lower the incidence of asthma and the residents of the South Bronx about hazards of using illegal pesticides. Satellite Academy youth will develop a small composting program in their school cafeteria. They will give presentations to schoolmates to educate them about NYC solid waste issues and the role of composting as a waste prevention and recycling strategy. They will work with the custodians to set up the program and monitor participation. Compost will be delivered to a community garden located across the street from the school. Students will prepare and disseminate a newsletter about composting (and the project) to the school community.

St. Regis Mohawk Tribe, Environment Division
Year: 2002
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

The goal of the project is to inform the community of the potential health risks associated with the exposure to environmental impacts from industries located upstream by expanding a clearinghouse of environmental health related documents. Also, pamphlets would be produced and distributed, on a yearly basis, on the current fish consumption advisories impacting fisherpeople within the community. Questionnaires contained on the pamphlets will be evaluated to measure the usefulness of the documents to fisherpeople within the community. Ultimately, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe would like to use the collected data in order to develop their own Tribal Safe Fish Consumption Standards.

East New York Development Corporation
Year: 2002
Solid Waste Disposal

The objective of the project is to conduct a highly visible community education/involvement campaign around two remediation projects at the Pennsylvania Avenue and Fountain Avenue Landfills (sites located within the East New York Development Corporation service area) in Brooklyn, New York. This would be performed by educating and publicizing information - about contaminants found on these sites (where they come from, why they are still there, associated removal and clean-up costs, technologies/strategies employed to implement contaminant removal. Also, information concerning health effects of the current sites as they exist will be explored and provided to the community, and lastly, discussions concerning trade-offs (if any) will be discussed with the communities during a series of designated public meetings.

Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency

The focus of the project is to conduct primarily an environmental health conference. Through funding assistance, the Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment (ATFE) will be able to directly impact the people of Akwesasne by giving the organization, environmental health experts and University-based researchers the opportunities to report 15 years of research findings directly to the community and decision-makers. Because oral tradition is an integral part of community tradition, providing a conference format and allowing people to ask questions will meet the needs of the Mohawk general public. AFTE’s participant recruitment plan will include: seeking co-sponsorship from community partners; seeking commitments from community Directors of Health Clinics and Environmental Programs; providing a forum with dynamic speakers; using innovative ways to share years of collected research information, including using a live broadcast to address the needs of the fluent speaking members of the community, namely the elders. Further, leaders and health care providers from the other 21 Native communities in the region will be invited to participate in the conference, including members of the Haudenosaunee Environmental Task Force and the Haudenosaunee Whole Health Initiative.

Vassar College, Department of Geology and Geography
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency

The goals of the project are to identify environmental hazardous facilities as well as past and present land uses; describe the character of the communities in which they occur using variables such as race, linguistic isolation, and economic class; and evaluate correlations in terms of environmental justice. The Vassar College, Department of Geology and Geography, intends to meet this by utilizing a Geographic Information System (GIS) to create a comprehensive database of environmental and demographic data that can be correlated spatially. In addition, the project will include a database consisting of results from two previous angler surveys conducted within the Hudson River area by the New York State Department of Health. By focusing on the Mid-Hudson Valley Region of New York State (i.e., comprising the Counties of Greene, Ulster, Orange, Columbia, Dutchess and Putnam), the college anticipates the project will serve as a model for other communities wishing to examine the correlation between environmentally undesirable land uses and community demographics in order to address claims of environmental injustice.

Brooklyn Center for the Urban Environment
Year: 2001
Job Training, Farming and Fishing

This pilot program is an interactive hands-on program that emphasizes career development and environmental justice by exploring the community and environmental issues surrounding local gardening sites. The teens in the effected communities will engage in a systematic study if environmental conditions at these sites and relay the data to a GIS program.

Make The Road by Walking
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

Make the Road by Walking will undertake a Community Environmental Health Project that will target environmentally hazardous conditions known to exacerbate or cause asthma and childhood lead poisoning. This two-phase project (research and mapping and community organizing, outreach and education) aims to build community capacity to identify local environmental justice problems and to enhance community understanding of environmental and public health systems.

UPROSE
Year: 2001
Solid Waste Disposal, Community Resiliency

UPROSE will educate parents, senior citizens, and other adults about the environmental justice issues that are currently impacting their community. The Sunset Park community in Brooklyn houses numerous industrial users, former industrial sites, solid waste transfer stations, auto salvaging operations as well as other industries. UPROSE will conduct targeted outreach to community groups and community-based organizations in the area including churches, hospitals, schools and senior citizen centers. The purpose of which is to enhance community understanding of environmental and public health information systems and generate information on pollution in the community.

Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment, Inc. (ATFE)
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

The ATFE proposes to build upon existing partnerships, which will enable them to collect, analyze and consolidate data on both contaminant levels and cultural use areas using GIS mapping. The target audience for this work includes their existing partners: ATFE members, a community advisory group which consists of health care providers, educators, environmental programs and cultural institutions in Akwesasne that continues to participate in cultural activities. The ATFE expects by the end of the project to develop an atlas which will visually show levels of contaminants and their overlap with traditional cultural use areas and to conduct a series of meetings that will communicate the findings of this project to interested community members.

Chinese Progressive Association (CPA)
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

The Lead Poisoning Prevention/Asthma/Air Pollution will focus on increasing awareness on the correlation between health and the environment in a linguistically and culturally appropriate way. The environmental focus will be asthma and lead poisoning. CPA will conduct community workshops targeting tenant associations, community groups, senior centers, day care centers and churches.

West Harlem Environmental Action (WE ACT)
Year: 2001
Air Quality

WE ACT in partnership with the Healthy Schools Network, plans to work with four schools in Harlem and Washington Heights to address the issues of indoor air quality and empower parents to protect their children from environmental health threats in schools. In schools, common indoor air issues included inadequate fresh air, carbon monoxide, irritant dusts, poisonous molds, volatile organic compounds formaldehyde and pesticides. WE ACT and Healthy Schools Network will use “Tools for Schools” kits provided by EPA Region 2 to work with parent/youth teams to prioritize what environmental solutions need to be implemented.

Atlantic States Legal Foundation
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency, Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

The goal of this project is to organize an environmental justice committee representing the ethnic minority community in Onondaga County for whom English is not their primary language (e.g., Spanish, Albanian, Asian, and Russian). The Environmental Justice Committee will be educated on what environmental and health information is available and how to disseminate it to minority populations. Examples of valuable information include lead paint inventory (GIS mapped), TRI, Onondaga Lake fish advisory, and other information regarding identified Superfund sites and subsites in the County.

The Rochester Council on Occupational Safety & Health (ROCOSH)
Year: 2000
Air Quality

In conjunction with the target community Rochester City School District, ROCOSH will conduct a project that will address the issue of indoor air quality in the Rochester City Schools. They will also partner with the Board of Education Non-Teaching Employees-American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (BENTE-AFSCME Local 2419), and the Rochester Teachers Association (RTA Local 616). The project will address the Clean Air Act and the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act by assessing the air quality in the Rochester public schools by utilizing the EPA Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools kit to ensure that the schools they target have a healthy environment for learning.

Council on the Environment
Year: 2000
Solid Waste Disposal, Air Quality

The Greenpoint-Williamsburg Environmental Education Project (GWEE) will address the following environmental justice issues: 1) the prevalence of environmentally related public health issues in minority/low income communities, and 2) the process through which environmental information is made available in these communities. Students participating in the project will monitor air pollution throughout the community focusing, in particular, on diesel bus and truck traffic. All criteria pollutants will be measured and reports will be prepared, and results from the air monitoring will be made available to the community. Students will also stimulate their classmates, families, and neighbors to reduce solid and hazardous waste and will educate the community at large about waste prevention methods.

El Puente de Williamsburg
Year: 2000
Solid Waste Disposal, Air Quality

The EcoLab project will involve young Latinos in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, in understanding environmental hazards in the community, identifying solution, and developing creative tools to promote environmental justice among their peers and other community residents. The two primary issues that the project will focus on are the lack of green open space in the community (less than 0.5 acres per 1,000 people), and solid waste management (garbage trucks, waste generation, recycling). A key environmental justice issue to be addressed is access to information and opportunities for informed participation. In a bilingual community where residents do not always understand the statistic connecting air pollution with asthma prevalence, it is important to develop creative communication mechanisms to engage people in discussing possible solutions and priorities for action.

Brentwood Council of Parent/Teacher/Student Associations (PTSAs)
Year: 2000
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

The Brentwood Council of PTSAs, in collaboration with the Brentwood Union Free School District and Dr. Luz Claudio, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, will investigate a suspected correlation between high incidences of childhood asthma and cancer in the geographic catchment area of Brentwood and North Bay Shore (Brentwood School District). Also under investigation are the many toxic waste and Superfund sites directly impacting this catchment area. Prior studies conducted by the Brentwood/Bay Shore Breast Cancer Coalition and health care professional noted that the catchment area appears to have a high and disproportionate incidence of childhood cancer and childhood asthma. Grant monies would be used to conduct a survey and study to learn the extent and severity of asthma and cancer among the target population in the catchment area. The funds will also be used to map these childhood disorders and to correlate the resultant demographic data with the location of the many toxic wastes and Superfund sites. Non-project funded follow-up would include a comprehensive strategy of education and prevention which can lead to improvements tin the quality of life for the more than 93,000 residents living in the catchment area.

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North Carolina

Cape Fear River Watch, Inc.
Year: 2016
Subsistence Fishing Hazards due to Pollution and Water Quality

This project will bring together several partners to educate and empower residents living along the lower portion of the Northeast Cape Fear River who rely on subsistence fishing. The Northeast Cape Fear River has been classified as “impaired” due to high levels of mercury contamination detected in fish tissue samples. Subsistence fishers and their families are at risk from exposure to mercury and other toxins in the fish tissue. The project will educate the affected communities about the risks of subsistence fishing using empowering, culturally-specific, and appropriate language and techniques, including train-the-trainer sessions. Additionally, the project also will help build the capacity of the affected community to better participate in the regulatory processes that affect their source of subsistence fishing and drinking water.

Greensboro Housing Coalition
Year: 2014
Healthy Homes, Air Quality

The “Healthy Homes Greensboro” collaborative will work to reduce housing-related asthma hospitalizations in low-income, minority neighborhoods in Greensboro, North Carolina resulting from exposure to toxic chemicals. Community residents and collaborative partners will create a comprehensive plan for healthy homes and advocate together for multi-level policy changes, including the enforcement and strengthening of current policies and regulations, funding for community education initiatives, and working with local government to address gaps in healthcare. The Coalition and its partners will also identify at-risk families residing in substandard housing, repair homes with mold damage, enforce housing safety standards, and provide Integrated Pest Management solutions to residents to address and eliminate the misuse of pesticides and other toxic chemicals.

Rural Empowerment Association for Community Help (REACH)
Year: 2015
Community Resiliency

The purpose of this project is to enlighten the public, including grassroots, mid-range, and upper level stakeholders about the correlation between industrial animal operations and developing environmental stressors and how to protect themselves from these risks. This project is primarily concerned with the effects of these impacts can have on industrial animal operations.

Clean Energy Durham
Year: 2013
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

Clean Energy Durham will launch a volunteer driven, neighbor-to-neighbor energy education program for low-income residents of Lee County, North Carolina. Residents will learn the benefits of reducing electricity and how this reduction can lead to a decrease in pollution produced by area power plants. The project aims to educate disproportionately impacted communities by encouraging environmental stewardship, increasing residents’ leadership skills, and building capacity to create sustainable and healthy environmental change. The program will train volunteers throughout the community who commit to teaching their neighbors about saving energy.

Cape Fear River Watch, Inc.
Year: 2012
Water Quality

Cape Fear River Watch, Inc. intends to address the lack of affordable environmental education for children living in the Greenfield Lake and Burnt Mill Creek watersheds in Wilmington, North Carolina. The organization will establish environmentally-focused camps for underserved children ages 8 to 17. The camps, with activities focused on learning about the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act and the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, will teach participants to be excellent stewards of the environment through personal action. Students will gain experience in scientific methods related to the survey of water quality and field work. Learning data analysis will lead to finding solutions to minimize negative impacts on local waterways. Students will also be encouraged to make real-world connections and develop critical thinking skills through the exploration of New Hanover County watershed.

Toxic Free North Carolina
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

Toxic Free NC seeks to improve the health and safety of migrant and seasonal farmworkers through education about pesticide exposure by creating a plain-language analysis of EPA’s Worker Protection Standards available in both Spanish and English. The project will develop and deliver a series of training sessions throughout North Carolina. These sessions will cover workers’ rights as they relate to pesticides in the workplace and EPA’s proposed revisions to the Worker Protection Standard. The project hopes to encourage immigrant and low-income workers to become engaged in local and federal rulemaking processes that may impact their health, safety and welfare.

Rural Empowerment Association for Community Help (REACH)
Year: 2011
Water Quality

REACH studies Swine Lagoons in NC – This project will detect, assess, and evaluate arsenic concentrations in surface water located near swine lagoons and spray fields. Arsenic trioxide and arsenic pentoxide are both designated as hazardous substances under Section 102(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The project seeks to enhance community knowledge of toxicity indicators in animal waste and provide information on the impact of water quality as it relates to swine and public health.

Roger-Eubanks Neighborhood Association
Year: 2010
Solid Waste Disposal, Renewables and Energy Efficiency

The focus of PITCH is to achieve reductions of waste inputs to landfills and repair household energy and water inefficiencies. This will be achieved by reducing household solid waste, composting kitchen waste, recycling mixed paper, and using compost in a local community garden. In addition, the project will educate the residents on conserving water and energy through weatherization improvements, repairs of small-scale plumbing and sewage inefficiencies, and replacement of incandescent light bulbs with fluorescent ones. The project will engage Orange Country residents, the broader public, and news media on PITCH-In’s call to action for waste reduction and environmental stewardship.

NC Environmental Justice Network
Year: 2008/ 2009
Water Quality

Providing outreach, education, and technical assistance to communities and health care providers in 5 rural counties of eastern North Carolina. The project will assist these communities in organizing to advocate for local governmental decision-making to approve policies and programs that will reduce or alleviate the environmental health impacts of confined animal feeding operations (CAFO) in the target counties. The project will also assist communities in organizing landowners, testing and analyzing wells for groundwater pollution, and to advocate for local decision-making to implement cleanup/repair efforts on community wells or identify and implement alternative drinking sources like tapping onto county or community water lines.

Rural Empowerment Association for Community Health
Year: 2007
Air Quality, Water Quality, Pollution

The identified issue for this project is residents' exposure to air and water contaminants, particularly hydrogen sulfide, from local hog operations within Duplin County. The environmental and/or public health result the community hopes to achieve is a reduction in the exposure of residents to air and water contaminants from local hog operations. REACH hopes to achieve this goal by: (1) working with local hog operations to utilize new technologies that will eliminate the need for lagoons and spray fields; or (2) working with local hog operations to get them to comply with state guidelines for operating spray fields.

Rural Empowerment Association for Community Help (REACH)
Year: 2005

Toxic Substances
This REACH environmental health research project will address the health disparities of low-income individuals and people of color who suffer from allergies, asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and depression in Duplin County, North Carolina. These health disparities are possibly resulting from exposure of toxins from animal waste at nearby industrial

West End Revitalization Association
Year: 2001
Water Quality

This project will address the environmental problems that occur as a result of failing septic systems and no water/sewer services: The project objectives are; (1) conducting educational workshops for residents in the target area and (2) supporting activities of planning, funding, and installation of water/sewer services for the long-term public health and safety of current and future residents

Shaw University
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

Shaw University proposes to enhance the role of the Environmental Justice Education and Research Center to better address the disproportionate share of the negative environmental consequences, which result from lack of education, knowledge, and awareness of environmental justice issues and concerns. The Center proposes to engage high school and college age students in research activities that respond to community, and environmental justice issues affecting Raleigh citizens.

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North Dakota

Clean Water Fund
Year: 2000
Water Quality

With this grant Clean Water Fund plans to implement a project to help farmworkers in the North Dakota Red River Valley area inventory environmental threats near their residences which could impact their health, and help them develop and implement strategies to resolve or mitigate these problems. The project will conduct workshops/training to help farmworkers identify problems, assist in research and the development of strategies to address these problems, train other agencies to help recognize environmental problems, and develop and distribute Spanish language materials on environmental issues.

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Ohio

Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership (TNP)
Year: 2017
Toxic Substances

TNP will create an educational initiative to reduce exposure of residents to potential soil contamination from former industrial activities. The initiative includes the creation of a curriculum of best practices for residents and volunteers re-purposing vacant land in Warren through urban agriculture, food production, recreation, yard expansion, and other means. A range of educational materials will be shared with residents throughout the neighborhoods of Warren. Materials will be distributed strategically across multiple points of interaction including before, during, and after nearby demolitions; and during the launch or continued re-use of vacant land for food production or recreational use.

Environmental Health Watch
Year: 2013
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

This project seeks to decrease health disparities, increase food access, improve water quality, and implement storm water management solutions in Cuyahoga County. Environmental Health Watch will implement an eight week hands-on summer program for youth ages 11 to14 helping participants to understand the importance of water quality and learn storm water management solutions in an urban farm setting. The training program will concentrate on urban organic gardening basics including vermiculture, composting, and data collection. Trainees will also learn to facilitate community meetings and meet with local leaders and policy makers to advocate for food justice and equity on behalf of themselves and their community.

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

This project will address the need for community education about the risks and sources of lead exposure in children while also addressing lead exposure from dilapidated housing conditions. The project will test for lead and other contaminants left in the soil by residential demolition. Residents of the City of Youngstown will perform outreach to connect neighbors with programs and services that can help them abate dangerous lead conditions in their homes. This project will also provide soil testing for neighborhood vacant lots in an effort to identify lead hot spots and assist community groups in planning gardens and other vacant land reuse projects.

Ohio Environmental Council
Year: 2012
Water Quality,
Toxic Substances, Water Quality, Community Resiliency
The Ohio Environmental Council will plan, coordinate and execute two “Fracking 101” trainings and two citizen town hall meetings in Appalachian Ohio designed to educate citizens on the possible public health and environmental impacts of deep shale drilling and to give those citizens access to decision makers. Trainings will address four key topics including testing drinking water, examining state regulations governing fracking, farm and landowner issues and possible health implications of fracking.

Cleveland Tenants Organization
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances

Cleveland Tenants Organization’s goal is to reduce the misuse of pesticides by tenants and landlords when treating bed bug infestations. The project will educate landlord and tenant populations in Cleveland, Ohio about safer and more effective bed bug control options This project will train outreach staff to work with landlord-tenant populations in addressing prevention and treatment issues surrounding bed bug infestations and educate landlords, property managers and tenants in subsidized multi unit family housing about the prevention of bed bug infestations and pest management methods to more safely control and treat bed bug populations in rental housing units.

Earth Day Coalition
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances

This project will address environmental issues associated with vacant lots and local climate change impacts. This project will work directly with the community to revitalize, develop and utilize vacant plots of land from the city land bank and significantly expand open space, restore natural habitats and green the community with native plants. This project will educate local residents on native Ohio plants, pesticides, and sustainable naturescaping. This project will address climate change and help students and residents learn how to document the carbon footprint of landscape actions.

Communities United for Action
Year: 2010
Air Quality

This project will provide education and outreach to four low-income communities in Mill Creek Valley. This project will educate residents on air toxics and develop strategies to reduce air pollution. The project will connect community leaders with eighth grade classes at three neighborhood schools to educate students on air pollution, toxic chemicals, and environmental justice. The project will develop local environmental justice leaders and a local action plan to reduce air pollution.

Cleveland Tenants Association
Year: 2007
Air Quality, Healthy Homes

The identified issue for this project is resident exposure to indoor environmental hazards. The environmental and/or public health result the community hopes to achieve is the reduction in exposure to such hazards. Cleveland Tenants Association and Environmental Health Watch hopes to achieve this goal by: (1) conducting educational outreach at tenant sites and community events regarding hazards and self-protective actions to reduce risk related exposure; (2) performing building inspections with tenants to evaluate hazards; (3) assisting tenants organize to secure landlord repairs and/or remediation of hazards and to affect local policy decisions regarding hazards and regulation and enforcement procedures; and (4) providing referrals for additional resources, such as home visits and additional educational opportunities, as needed.

Earth Day Coalition
Year: 2005

Air Quality, Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal
The purpose of this project is to build a network of minority student leaders to work with a low-income and minority neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio to promote community involvement on the neighborhood s environmental, health and quality of life issues. The local environmental issues to be addressed are outdoor air quality, community drinking water and water quality concerns, and solid waste concerns including illegal dumping and recycling. The project will provide resources, information access tools and hands-on training to the community. The project will enhance internet education and build community capacity in the community where significant environmental and resulting health hazards exist. Partners include the St. Martin De Porres School and Glenville Community Development Corporation.

Earth Day Coalition
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing, Water Quality

Bridging the Digital Divide: Fish Consumption, Water Pollution, Public Health Education and Environmental Justice Project: This project will (1) bridge the gap between environmental regulators and minority communities by empowering citizens with information, education, training, resources and technical assistance on fish consumption issues; (2) provide EJ communities with information and training, in partnership with the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, which will include hands-on training with water quality testing kits, information on what fish is safe to eat, how often one should eat fish, where is the pollution coming from, how communities can work toward pollution prevention; (3) conduct an expo on fish consumption issues.

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Oklahoma

The ARC Foundation
Year: 2017
Water Quality

Oklahoma suffers from frequent heat waves and drought during summer months, which disproportionally impact low-income residents. ARC seeks to train up to 200 Oklahoma City residents on affordable water conservation practices for home use, as well as to bring more awareness to the community about the need to protect its natural water resources. The program will develop a curriculum to train local youths and adults on the design and installation of residential water collection and storage systems. The course curriculum will also include identifying sources of fresh water available for consumption (surface/groundwater) and exploring strategies for conserving water at home. The project aims to install approximately 23 water collection and storage systems.

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
Year: 2015
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The project will call for the implementation of an education project focusing on the importance of keeping our water sources clean. The hands-on program will provide educational activities and recycling support to school children, elders groups, and civic groups in the areas surrounding Wister, McAlester, Sardis, Beaver’s Bend, and Hugo Lakes in southeastern Oklahoma. The goal is to help citizens recognize the critical role of each individual in reducing the negative impact of litter in the local environment, protecting and conserving local waters, and making a positive impact on the environment. This project, titled “Project Oka” (Oka is the Choctaw word for water) will be headquartered in the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Environmental Sustainability Office in Durant, Oklahoma (zip code 74702), but will extend to other areas in southeast Oklahoma including Wister, McAlester, Tuskahoma, Broken Bow, and Hugo. The project will support the community by addressing local environmental issues and reducing vulnerability through education of citizens. Participants will be empowered to recycle litter instead of dumping to maintain the health of local water systems.

Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians
Year: 2013
Water Quality, Air Quality

This project will develop a training program to address drinking water and air quality issues that compromise the health and welfare of members within the Otoe-Missouria Tribal Community. The tools and resources provided during training will enable citizens to better understand environmental regulations, empower them to make informed decisions and have greater impact with regulatory and enforcement agencies when reporting violations.

Windhollow Foundation, Inc. (WHF)
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances

The Windhollow Foundation will conduct testing identifying asbestos and lead paints in Anadarko area abandoned housing. The project involves the testing of dilapidated, abandoned housing, mostly dating between 1900-1960, located in the Anadarko, OK area. Testing will identify areas of public health concern, particularly asbestos and lead based paint. The project also addresses a lack of awareness and skills deficiency in the local Minority Small Business Building Contractor population. WHF encourages asbestos, lead and mold removal training. This will educate residents allowing them to be equal partners in the pursuit of environmental justice.

Retired Educators for Youth Agricultural Programs
Year: 2003
Solid Waste Disposal

This community-based organization’s mission is to increase opportunities for culturally diverse youth in agriculture in the rural areas of Bristol, Newly and Gypsy, in Creek County, Oklahoma City. They will promote management practices that will help improve and prevent roadside dumping in the community A REAP paraprofessional and students will actively identify roadside dump sites and host workshops addressing solid waste management in their own communities. REAP will work with an Oklahoma State University solid waste disposal specialist to provide educational material and resources addressing solid waste management. TOLA is a 501 is a (c) (3) non profit organization that will assist REAP students to distribute educational material and coordinate an educational workshop addressing solid waste management in under served communities. REAP will coordinate a committee consisting of OSU, NARCS, TOLA and residents. This committee will provide technical support to communities researching alternative methods to manage solid waste. Youth participating in Retired Educators for Youth Agricultural Programs ( REAP) are actively involved with 4-H and Future Farmers of America (FFA) projects.

Kaw Nation of Oklahoma
Year: 2002
Water Quality

The nation will conduct educational outreach and advocacy in rural areas on or adjacent to tribal land, in order to enhance the goals of the Kaw Nation Environmental Department. The petroleum industry and agricultural activity have had an adverse impact on Tribal surface and groundwater quality. A recent watershed study revealed a potential risk to human health and the health and diversity of surrounding habitat. The sources of the contaminants are diverse. Data is needed to identify the pollutants and their sources. An Environmental Co-Operative will be created to train researchers, conduct the research, and share the information obtained via workshops and environmental awareness sessions so that adverse environmental concerns on and/or adjacent to Kaw tribal land can be addressed. Target: Kaw Indian Nation–low income Native Americans.

L.E.A.D. Agency
Year: 2002
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

The impacted communities near the Tar Creek Superfund Site in Northeast Oklahoma has to deal with severe contamination problems affecting all areas of their lives. Native Americans in the Northern Oklahoma area depend on subsistence fishing and hunting to supplement their diets, but twenty-three years ago acid mine water began being discharged into streams. Tar Creek runs through five communities, and two rivers flowing through the County bring toxic substances, mine water, and discharges loaded with heavy metals to the Grand Lake of the Cherokees. This lake is in the southern edge of Ottawa County. L.E.A.D. will conduct research and identify substances of concern by reviewing available data on releases that impact Ottawa County and its streams, and the amount of miles the contamination extends will be studied. This information will be compiled and edited into an easy-to-understand format and presented in small group settings. Target: The low-income communities of Miami, North Miami, Commerce, Quapaw, Picher, and Cardin, the eight tribes represented and Hispanic residents. Ottawa is the poorest county in Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Landowners and Tenants Association(TOLTA)
Year: 2001
Water Quality

The purpose of the project is to establish community-based pollution prevention strategies to protect drinking water. This will be accomplished by using a Geographical Information System (GIS) to incorporate global positioning (GPS) data to develop a database that will establish baseline data and identify problems through spatial analysis. The database will identify land descriptions and water, oil, and abandon well locations, as well as track contaminated drinking water wells. The database will also provide base information for research and educational materials addressing water quality issues. TOLTA will collaborate on this project with the Retired Educators for Agriculture Programs (REAP) and several State agencies. TOLTA members and REAP students will receive training at Oklahoma State University to complete 450 land assessments to protect their drinking water. Training on GIS and GPS will be conducted by the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Inter-Tribal Environmental Council (ITEC)
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The Inter-Tribal Environmental Council Tribal Community Involvement Project aims at improving communication among stakeholders and identifies ways the tribal environmental departments and members can increase dialog with other stakeholders. Tribal citizens will be queried on their environmental concerns regarding the refinery and their concerns about possible new industry. This research will then be forwarded to local development officials. Understanding and knowledge of environmental justice issues with industry will be increased due to public outreach to tribal citizens. Input from the community will be given to decision-makers in the redevelopment of the Basin Refinery site, thereby assisting them in preventing and eliminating environmental justice problems. A community involvement model for ITEC and non-ITEC tribes will be developed to use in evaluating possible redevelopment of contaminated sites.

Eastside Environmental Coalition, Inc.
Year: 2000
Toxic Substances

This project aims at increasing knowledge about hazardous substance issues regarding Superfund sites in northeast Oklahoma City. The project will focus on the detection, assessment, and evaluation of the effects and risks to human health from hazardous substances near the four Superfund sites populated by mostly poor African-Americans. The project is a cooperative effort of two community-based organizations so that the community can become involved in the decision-making process. A conference will be held focusing on environmental justice issues surrounding the Superfund sites. Three public meetings will be held to identify and discuss environmental justice issues. Two half-day workshops for high school students and teachers will be conducted to teach how to access and interpret public health and environmental data.

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Oregon

Trash for Peace (TfP)
Year: 2017
Solid Waste

TfP’s Sustainability Education Program (SEP) will foster environmental sustainability and stewardship through solid waste disposal education for youth at various affordable housing properties in Portland. The partner properties are in areas of Portland that struggle with issues of poverty, including a lack of proper trash disposal and recycling options. Proposed project activities include: 1) implementing weekly TfP SEP activities at four affordable housing sites, 2) reaching approximately 60 youth and over 200 families throughout the year, and 3) recruiting and supervising a minimum of two youth interns throughout the year in TfP’s enviro-business programming.

Beyond Toxics
Year: 2015
Community Resiliency, Farming and Fishing

This project is designed to achieve community-identified solutions and accomplish measurable results by identifying areas of vulnerability, collecting community data, and building community effectiveness. This project seeks to help residents learn about how protecting natural and local wetlands can reduce the risk of flooding in flood prone areas. Additionally, community participants will learn to take necessary steps to reduce their vulnerability to flooding caused by increasingly frequent storms. Beyond Toxics will also work with residents to reduce health risks from exposure to high levels of fine particulate matter and offer training on growing organic, culturally appropriate food for themselves and launching a community garden. Through this project, Beyond Toxics will provide education, training, and outreach on environmental issues and building capacity for current and future leaders on EJ issues, particularly vulnerable members of the Hispanic community.

Immigrant Refugee Community Organization (IRCO)
Year: 2012
Toxic Substances

The Immigrant Refugee Community Organization (IRCO) will work to reduce environmental exposure to harmful toxic cleaning chemicals and residential exposure to pesticides for the growing number of African immigrants and refugees living in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. Multilingual, multicultural staff from the IRCO, experts, and project partners, will take a “train-the-trainer” approach to provide community leaders from smaller ethnic organizations, such as Burqaa Lami Oromo Community Organization, Burundian Community Association, and Liberian Community Association, with the necessary information and tools to take ownership and thereby improve the health of their families and community. Trained community leaders will engage African families in culturally and linguistically sensitive problem-solving activities at community workshops introducing them to risks associated with over-the-counter products commonly sold and used in the U.S.

OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon
Year: 2012
Air Quality

This project will incorporate community-based participation and scientific research to identify and prioritize risks from hazardous air toxins that disproportionately impact low-income, minority communities in metropolitan Portland, Oregon. OPAL will work to educate community members on air quality standards, awareness of air pollution and land use through trainings and surveys focused on the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality’s environmental justice disparate impact analysis which showed that communities of color and low-income communities are disproportionately impacted by air toxics in the Portland area. OPAL will conduct outreach to community groups, partners and leaders and facilitate workshops to identify and advance community priorities and air pollution risk reduction strategies.

Verde
Year: 2012
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal, Job Training, Farming and Fishing  

The "Let us Build Cully Park" Project focuses on North East Portland’s Cully Neighborhood, which suffers from multiple environmental harms. This project will coordinate outreach and training activities that include a public education program related to the Clean Water Act and storm water management techniques. Outreach activities will target Cully Park’s youth residents and will encourage them to participate in the design of park improvements aimed at avoiding potential exposure to methane and groundwater contamination. Additionally, the project will educate community youth about landfills, park development, environmental protection and green careers to empower students to design a community garden and nature play area.

Beyond Toxics
Year: 2011
Air Quality

The “Families, Health and Air Pollution Project” seeks to reduce the asthma risks among West Eugene School District children. The project will conduct community health research of West Eugene, Oregon. The Project’s goal is to perform GIS mapping and conduct a Toxic tour of the affected community area. Beyond Toxics will work to address the problems of disproportionate pollution exposure and poor health outcomes for children in low-income neighborhoods of the West Eugene School District and educate the community on asthma risk reduction.

Josiah Hill III Clinic
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The” Green Steward” project will train faith based congregations to reduce exposure to toxic chemicals and indoor air pollutants. The” Green Steward” project will train 120 congregants from faith based congregations to reduce human environmental exposure to toxic chemicals and indoor air pollutants. Josiah Hill III Clinic with work with congregations to deliver home workshops and green cleaning parties to raise awareness of toxic chemicals and human health impacts; take action by instructing congregants to use green alternatives and improve air quality in order to achieve better asthma outcomes. JHC will conduct blood screening clinics at each congregation and educate on lead poisoning and environmental hazards for young children.

DEPAVE
Year: 2010
Water Quality

Following on our successful 2007-9 re-greening efforts, DEPAVE will continue our high momentum community green space redevelopment efforts during 2010 with up to six additional de-paving projects working with a diverse array of partners. DEPAVE plans to use this present funding request from the EPA to match recently awarded grant monies from EMSWCD to re-green two North Portland schools; Portland Village School and Astor Elementary, with a combined impervious surface area footprint of 7,000 square feet. By replacing paved areas at both of the planned sites with playfields and native plantings, runoff rates will be reduced from 10% to 55%. The physical removal of asphalt from these sites will be completed by volunteers and will involve members of the local communities. Thus, the proposed de-paving projects will not only restore native soils, allow for on-site rainwater infiltration and beautify urban spaces, but will also serve as a method for community building and provide educational outreach opportunities. Through participation in these public greenspace redevelopment efforts community volunteers will gain education and inspiration for potential de-paving and re- greening opportunities in their own backyards, multiplying the projects' benefits.

Oregon Toxics Alliance
Year: 2010
Air Quality

The West Eugene Industrial Corridor Environmental Health Project is a partnership between Centro Latino Americano, a community-based Latino human services organization, and Oregon Toxics Alliance, an environmental health advocacy organization, to engage an underserved and vulnerable community in environmental health actions. Neighborhoods in the West Eugene Industrial Corridor have higher percentages of Latino, disabled and poverty level residents than all other areas in Eugene. The purpose of the project is to enhance the community’s understanding of environmental pollutants, improve the community’s ability to communicate their environmental health concerns, and mobilize community and business partnerships to help minority and low-income neighborhoods reduce their exposure to toxics. The project activates community involvement by organizing public education opportunities, take-action events and community-based surveys at the neighborhood level.

Verde
Year: 2008/ 2009
Community Resiliency

Building the capacity of low-income, people-of-color residents of NE Portland and residents of the Hacienda CDC’s affordable housing project, to participate in and benefit from a major sustainable redevelopment project in their neighborhood. The project will include intensive outreach and education to local residents on the economic, environmental and public health challenges and benefits of the redevelopment project.

Multnomah County Health Department
Year: 2008/ 2009
Community Resiliency

Educating low-income and minority communities in the Portland area about sustainable ecological, economic and public health development practices. The recipient will build community capacity to benefit from and participate meaningfully in sustainability initiatives, while enhancing the accountability. The project will strengthen the capacity of the Multnomah County Sustainability Program to reach underserved and disproportionately impacted communities.

Organizing People, Activating Leaders
Year: 2006/ 2007
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

The Lents Community Project seeks to reduce the community’ polluted air, toxic hazards, substandard housing and a host of other environmental health risks in the Portland metro area. This project will focus on three national environmental justice priorities: (1) reducing asthma attacks; (2) reducing exposure to air toxics; and (3) revitalizing contaminated sites. OPAL will incorporate the first two priorities –asthma and air toxics- within Portland’s I-205 Breathe Campaign. OPAL intends to empower the community through education, training and outreach will help stimulate leadership development and proactive involvement around social and environmental justice issues.

Benton County
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

This project will increase high school students’ awareness and knowledge of local environmental health issues. High school students will participate in environmental research projects related to pesticides and well and surface water contamination. Benton County is a rural community whose students are primarily from low-income and Hispanic families.

Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Indians
Year: 2003
Community Resiliency

The project is an effort to develop and print education and outreach material on environmental contaminants. These materials will be provided to a broad range of tribal members (3000) and others in the adjoining community.

Oregon Center for Environmental Health
Year: 2002
Farming and Fishing, Water Quality  

The purpose of this project is to continue to promote safe fishing and fish preparation among low-income, minority and immigrant fishing communities along the Willamette River. Brochures, posters and flyers will be printed and distributed that describe the health hazards of contaminated fish and the reduction of risk through proper preparation and cooking. In addition, an “Adopt a Fishing Hole” campaign will be launched using multi-lingual volunteers to educate subsistence fishers and a task force will be developed to encourage participation in clean up initiatives.

Create
Year: 2001
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

This project will educate Washington county farm workers about pesticide exposure and protection; will research to determine pesticides exposure levels among Washington county farm workers; increase farm worker families’ understanding about environmental and public health information systems; help to determine ways in which the community can participate in environmental justice processes and pesticide education programs.

Create
Year: 2001
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The pesticide research project is designed to determine levels of exposure experienced by Washington County farm workers and their families. Research will be conducted to analyze data on toxic levels and their effects on and risks to human health.

Legal Aid Service of Oregon  
Year: 2001
Water Quality

This project will: (1) facilitate increases of communication, educate, and enhance understanding of accessing safe drinking water for low-income, migrant farm worker communities; (2) conduct drinking water testing in low-income and migrant farm worker communities; (3) build community capacity to identify the degree of the problem; (4) educate and build communication between affected communities and agencies regulating and enforcing safe drinking water.

Oregon Environmental Council  
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

Develop from a previous Environmental Justice grant, the resource guide, “Healthy Albina”, will be distributed to community members. This outreach activity will provide information on environmental and public health systems using GIS and other available databases.

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Pennsylvania
 

Women for a Healthy Environment
Year: 2017
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

This project will provide education and outreach to community residents of Pittsburgh about public health risks associated with lead exposure and will provide solutions for reducing such risk. Over 60% of Pittsburgh’s housing units were built before 1950 which indicates greater potential exposure to lead. The project will develop a comprehensive educational awareness campaign on the sources of lead, its health impacts, strategies that can be taken to reduce those risks, and community training that focuses on equipping citizens with tools and resources to engage with decision-makers and advance policies and plans that address lead exposures. Proposed project goals are to hold 36 community workshops, 2) Engage 500 community residents on lead risks, 3) Conduct advocacy training with 20 residents, 4) Facilitate 6 stakeholder meetings between new community leaders and City decision-makers, 5) Refer 36 residents to lead-focused programs, and 6) Distribute over 350 faucet mount filters and pitchers that remove lead in water.

Friends & Farmworkers, Inc.
Year: 2015
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The goal of the project is to educate farmworkers about pesticide exposure and to prepare community leaders to educate others on the subject. It will provide them with knowledge, training, and educator skills needed to directly address pesticide exposure. Farmworkers in Erie County, PA will benefit first and foremost by learning about the health risks associated with pesticide exposure; knowing and understanding the laws intended to protect them and the willingness of Friends of Farmworkers (FOF) to help; and becoming aware of the importance of environmental sustainability for the health of both the farmworker community and the general population.

Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture (PASA)
Year: 2015
Farming and Fishing

The project will empower farmers to adapt to environmental conditions through sustainable agricultural methods including building soil and enhancing biodiversity on their farms. By bringing farmers, extension educators, researchers, and private and land grant universities together to learn and share with one another, the project will foster a community-based learning and innovation network to guide future work supporting the Pennsylvania agricultural community. PASA will host two on-farm Field Days, one Pre-Conference Track at the 2016 Farming for the Future Conference, and one webinar. The project seeks to increase Pennsylvania farmers’ knowledge about new environmental impacts on farms, both ecologically and economically. At least 100 farmers in Pennsylvania will attend educational workshops and increase their understanding of key environmental stressors and sustainable agricultural methods that can build farm resiliency. Through a Project Planning Committee and culminating Round Table Meeting, a community-based learning and innovation network including farmers, agricultural organizations, Penn State Extension, and university students and researchers will be formed to advise project development and set new goals for future collaborative work.

Clean Air Council
Year: 2013
Air Quality

The Clean Air Council will identify and address public health concerns in Philadelphia’s Port Richmond neighborhood where residents are disproportionately impacted by high levels of air pollution. Residents will participate in workshops and coalition building to develop policy solutions that will reduce harmful exposure to pollution from area factories, chemical processing facilities, ocean-going vessels, and heavy traffic from nearby Interstate 95. The workshops will also help residents understand the current policies available to reduce air pollution exposure in over-burdened neighborhoods and provide an advocacy model for other waterfront communities facing similar issues.

Concilio de Organizaciones Hispanas de Filadelphia, Inc.
Year: 2013
Toxic Substances

The organization seeks to reduce children’s’ exposure to lead poisoning for Philadelphia families living in old, deteriorating homes. Through the use of culturally appropriate education materials, residents will receive education about preventing lead and carbon monoxide poisoning and fire safety planning.

JASTECH Development Services, Inc.
Year: 2013
Toxic Substances, Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

This project will develop a community-based campaign and community advisory board to address the presence of toxic substances in local waterways in the Overbrook community in Philadelphia. The organization plans to minimize residents’ exposure to poor water quality through a series of outreach initiatives and community cleanup efforts. Through a series of workshops, residents will learn to properly dispose of household chemicals and other toxic substances, recycling techniques and how to effectively engage community leaders in an effort to participate in policy and decision making processes.

The Clean Air Council
Year: 2011
Air Quality

The Clean Air Council to develop air quality assessment for Port Richmond community. The Clean Air Council and its partners will develop a neighborhood air quality assessment in the Port Richmond community in Philadelphia. The goal of the assessment is to promote a healthier environment and improved public health. The assessment will be used to advocate for improved emission controls at area ports, to promote changes in policy, to have input into Philadelphia’s comprehensive plan and zoning code revision efforts and to provide a model for participatory health assessments.

Concilio
Year: 2011
Air Quality

Concilio educates Latino families about asthma related health risks and triggers. Concilio will provide an asthma education program where families increase their knowledge of asthma triggers and learn what steps they can take to protect children’s health. Concilio will provide in-home visits to 40 Spanish-speaking families who use Temple University Hospital’s emergency department for asthma related complications. During hospital visits, Concilio will provide bilingual asthma education, an environmental health assessment of the home, contact information to remediation services and primary health physicians, and help families develop a plan of action to reduce asthma triggers related to air pollution.

Berks County Conservancy
Year: 2010
Solid Waste Disposal, Farming and Fishing

The Berks County Conservancy's "Operation G.R.U.B." Project (Gardens Replace Urban Blight), will work with city residents to transform areas of trash accumulation into urban gardens by educating communities about the environmental hazards associated with trash accumulation and the benefits of recycling and composting.

The Philadelphia Department of Public Health Division of Maternal, Child, and Family Health
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances

The Philadelphia Department of Public Health - Division of Maternal, Child, and Family Health (MCFH) will be teaming with the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (CLPPP) to provide outreach support and training for mothers and children at-risk and/or affected by lead exposure.

Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia
Year: 2010
Solid Waste Disposal, Farming and Fishing, Air Quality  

The Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia will work with the Hunting Park neighborhood residents to convert vacant lots that have become dump sites into community gardens. These new green spaces will greatly reduce the health hazards related to pollution runoff. The gardens will be used as outdoor classrooms to further promote stewardship of the environment. Air monitoring data will also be collected.

Women’s Health & Environmental Network
Year: 2010
Community Resiliency

The Women's Health & Environmental Network (WHEN) and partner New Courtland Network will develop and implement a program that will provide education and training to adult seniors focusing on the environmental and public health impacts of climate change and mitigation techniques each participant can take to lessen the effects of climate change.

Heritage Health Foundation, Inc.
Year: 2008/ 2009
Air Quality

Developing a community educational program to teach residents about asthma resulting from indoor and outdoor air quality, lead poisoning from lead-based paint, and asbestos exposures from older building materials. Public meetings will also be held to educate residents on local transportation-generated air quality factors and environmental health issues. In addition, the project will develop partnerships between different stakeholders, including residents, environmental groups and local governmental agencies.

Neighborhood Interfaith Movement
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances

Increasing the capacity of residents in Northwest Philadelphia to reduce pest problems, pesticide use and lead presence in homes and daycare centers through the creation of a community intervention partnership. NIM will collaborate with academic, governmental and non-profit partners to provide train-the-trainer sessions to create Healthy Homes Advocates (HHA), and to conduct Integrated Pest Management training.

Northern Liberties Neighborhood Association
Year: 2006/ 2007
Community Resiliency

The project will protect the public health of the residents by reducing exposure to contaminants; empowering members through education and outreach; encouraging meaningful public participation in the revitalization of brownfields in the community; ensuring compliance with environmental laws and regulations; and providing best practices. NLNA will research and created an inventory of contaminated sites and convene community meeting and focus groups to discuss the redevelopment of these sites. The project will educate and empower the community and create a database to alert communities about redevelopment work at the early stage before actual work begin. Empowering the community to be proactive rather than reactive enables the community to develop a process that will better ensure land reuse development.

Greater North Penn Area
Year: 2004
Air Quality

The applicant plans to study air quality in several communities in Southeastern Pennsylvania. The study will train elementary through high school students (a population diversity of 10-25% nonwhite) and employ them in collecting air sampling data. The study will focus on a regional transportation corridor that spans a broad range of suburban communities. The communities range from older, more diverse and lower than median income municipalities, municipalities of intermediate diversity and income to a newer, higher income and less diverse municipality. The study will identify air quality associated with newer, less diverse, higher income municipalities along the Southeastern Pennsylvania’s regional transportation corridor as compared to the older North Wales Borough to the newer, Lower Salford Township. The findings of this study will be used by regional planning entities.

Penn Soil Conservancy Charitable Trust
Year: 2003
Water Quality

This project will facilitate the formation and organization of a grass-roots action organization, the Dempsytown Road Informs the Neighborhood Committee (DRINC). DRINC will meet quarterly, conduct a water quality survey and bring in a consultant to help residents identify local environmental justice problems. The consultant will help the community members formulate appropriate designs for the Phase 1 aspect of an overall water quality improvement project. This small rural community north of Fryburg, PA has a serious problem with the quality of their drinking water. The community is dependent on private wells and springs that are being contaminated by failed septic systems.

Pennsylvania Resources Council
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Solid Waste

This project will be teaching community members of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania about the health risks associated with household hazardous waste (HHW), proper management of HHW, and alternatives to theses toxic products.

Conference of Consumer Organizations
Year: 2002
Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

The COCO Group is a consortium of consumer organizations. The proposal that they are requesting funding for is the Ambridge Landfill Monitoring project. This project will monitor and study the data that is received from the local Ambridge landfill. The Landfill has shown signs of having such contaminants as Boron, Cadmium, Sulfates and Arsenic. Their goals are 1) to monitor for these contaminants, 2) to see if pollutants have migrated outside the landfill and 3) to gather data beyond that available to the Department of Environmental Protection. They will measure their success if their concerns are enforced and bring a community based remedial program to the landfill.

DBBA Lake Erie-Allegheny Earth Force
Year: 2002
Air Quality, Water Quality

The DBBA Lake Erie-Allegheny Earth Force targeted audience is the inner-city youth in the local Lake Erie city area. The project’s goals are; 1) to help the youth to learn the effects of air and water pollution, 2) gather data dealing with air and water pollution issues, 3) to make civic minded decision on their impact on the local watershed. At the end of the proposal the data and findings of the project will be shared with the general public, hopefully enhancing the community understanding of environmental information systems and generate information on pollution in the community. The outcome for the project will be measured by two tests 1)pre and post testing of the youth’s attitude regarding community involvement and the environment and 2) to test the youth’s skill improvement in the area of decision making, fact-based research, analyzing multiple perspectives and data, being informed about community issues and problem solving.

Crime Prevention Association of Philadelphia (CPAP)
Year: 2002
Toxic Substances

The CPAP is community organization which has three separate community centers in South, North and West Philadelphia. The targeted audience is the local area surrounding their community center. The CPAP’s major concern is the abundance of houses in their community with high levels of lead. They have mapped out their plan using two key steps; 1) to train the community centers’ staff to train the parents about lead exposure issues. 2) Youth will gather public information about lead poisoning and its health effects and then design community information campaigns. At the end of the project the CPAP plans to measure two points in their plan, the process and the outcome. 1)The success of the process will be measured by the number of staff and parents trained in Education and Training components; number of students participating in the in the project: number of homes checked for lead and number of dissemination activities undertaken. 2)The success of the outcome will be measured by the number of families with positive lead tests who receive abatement information and help through the city programs and the number of community households reached by the various dissemination activities.

Historic Rittenhouse Town
Year: 2002
Water Quality

This project will consist of a simple message board that will show environmental concerns that will be collected by the Senior Environmental Corps. This group consists of twenty-five senior citizens volunteers with the help of the local youth from Theodore Roosevelt Middle school and professional staff belonging to the Fairmont Park Rangers Corps and the Center in the Park. The message board will consist of data collected concerning the local waterways. The targeted audiences are the communities of Germantown, Mt. Airy, Roxborough, East Falls, Manayunk and Chestnut Hill. The major goal of the project is to enhance the targeted communities’ knowledge of environmental and public health information system plus generate data on pollution in the community by making it easily accessible on the main roadway. The outcome they desire is to raise the level of community awareness of the environmental conditions of their local waterways. They will measure their success using short term and long term results. The short term will be evaluated by measuring the cooperative groups usage. The long term goal can be measured by the professional staff at the site counting how many people stop and read the message board and the staff will give them environmental literature.

Earth Force, Inc.
Year: 2002
Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The Urban Blight Education Initiative for the West Philadelphia Empowerment Zone. The project will train using its Community Action and Problem Solving (CAPS) process. The CAPS process consists of three key elements; 1) Service learning, a strategy to teach students to meet required core objectives and address real community needs; 2) Environmental education, learn specific information on environmental problems and issues; 3) Citizenship education, help the youth understand how public policy affects them and how they can change it. The goal of the project is to use its CAPS process to educate and make connections with common areas of concern, such as illegal dumping of solid waste on vacant lots; incorrect disposal of toxic substances/household hazardous wastes and outdoor air pollution from poorly sited local business such as auto body shops and dry cleaners. They will evaluate three issues at the end of the program; 1)Progress will be assessed by the teacher’s evaluations on how students meet their objectives and what are the results, 2)students will also evaluate their own objectives and results, 3) the Earth Force staff will obtain information from key people including community residents, local government and school officials, city agencies and environmental resources, political, business or industry representatives as to the effectiveness of the program.

AMD & ART, Inc.
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

This project intends to facilitate communication and coordination among local stakeholders regarding environmental, economic, and social health issues of a previous coal mining community in Somerset County, PA. They hope to facilitate cooperation among community members, government, and the private sector by providing a series of meetings, discussion forums, work shops, and training sessions, which is an extension of the education and outreach started by the Brownfields project and the Shade Creek Watershed Association. The goal is to stimulate environmental cleanup, economic growth, and opportunities for commercial business, recreational areas, and acid mines’ drainage treatment systems, by means of creating well-informed local leaders and cooperation of local businesses.

Clean Water Fund
Year: 2001
Air Quality

The Clean Water Fund seeks to work with the Community/Labor Refinery Tracking Committee (CLRTC) to train South and Southwest Philadelphia residents in proximity to Sunoco how to conduct ambient air sampling tests. Ambient air samples taken from these neighborhoods will be analyzed by a certified laboratory. Results will be presented to the public and discussed with city officials. Their plan also includes organizing community forums to educate the residents about pollution and its health effects. The outreach portion of the project will utilize the broad spectrum of member organizations, multimedia, and personal contact to solicit participation in the exercises. CLRTC, an association of civic and community groups in South and Southwest Philadelphia, will directly oversee the project, effectively serving nearly 82,000 residents in seven communities.

The Village of Arts & Humanities
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Water Quality

The 15-year-old Village of Arts and Humanities proposes to transform a two-block area consisting of 17 vacant lots into green spaces with trees, shrubs, and flowers, fostering indigenous vegetation growth. The North Philadelphia region is primarily African-American with an average income of $10,000. The Camac Area Greening Project will aid in enhancing air quality (trees) and water quality (runoff), education of approximately 150 residents on local ecology, pollution prevention, pollution-related health issues, and watershed awareness.

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Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands

Fideicomiso de la Tierra del Caño Martín Peña – San Juan, Puerto Rico
Year: 2017
Water Quality

*Project delayed due to hurricane recovery efforts. Project start date is dependent on recipient’s needs and readiness to begin*

Fideicomiso will develop a pilot project for the analysis, implementation and monitoring of rainwater harvesting strategies on three lots prone to flooding events in the Caño Martín Peña (CMP) area of the San Juan Bay Estuary, which serves seven local communities. This pilot project is a continuation of the efforts of Fideicomiso and ENLACE (project partner) to manage rainfall discharges and significantly reduce the communities’ susceptibility to flooding events, which result in: (1) water contamination of the San Juan Bay Estuary; and (2) exposure to health risks to community residents. The pilot project will analyze case studies on the three lots, and then implement and monitor strategies based on this analysis.

Coral Bay Community Council, Inc
Year: 2015
Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality

This project intends to raise awareness of the improper solid waste disposal in the Coral Bay community in St. John, USVI. Coral Bay Community Council seeks to increase the community awareness on the associated health risks and environmental hazards to the local coastal waters caused by the practice of illegal dumping of solid waste disposal in guts and bin sites in the Coral Bay Community. Through education and outreach, the applicant will work with local partners and residents to reduce or eliminate the dumping of solid waste in guts and bins, and mitigate point and non- point source contamination of coastal water and marine life.

Desarrollo Integral del Sur, Inc.
Year: 2014
Healthy Homes, Air Quality

Desarrollo Integral del Sur’s (DISUR) “Healthy Lungs, Now!” project will work to reduce exposure to air-born contaminants through an equitable, collaborative problem solving methodology that will positively impact the health and quality of life for the residents of the Tallaboa-Encarnación Community in Peñuelas, Puerto Rico. The project seeks to achieve a reduction in exposure to air contaminants through a focused approach that involves identifying key sources of air pollution in area homes and businesses. Residents will participate in education and training initiatives and public meetings where they will work with local government and representatives from industry to address air quality data gaps and identify best practices for reducing or eliminating emissions.

The Vieques Conservation Fund
Year: 2013
Water Quality

The Vieques Septic System Project will focus on surveying the status of old decaying septic systems that discharge into the ocean near five waterfront neighborhoods on the north coast of Puerto Rico. The goal of the project is to educate the citizens of Vieques, through community outreach efforts, about the pollution and public health risks posed by these deteriorating septic tanks. The project will also provide for the collection of data and surveys aimed at increasing public awareness of the threat of untreated runoff into nearby coastal waters. A comprehensive report containing recommendations for improvement will be sent to local government officials to encourage safer and efficient waste water management.

Leaders for the World, Inc.
Year: 2012
Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality

This project seeks to raise awareness of the environmental and public health effects of improper solid waste disposal in the Cantera Peninsula of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Area youth will learn practices that promote the elimination of water pollution and sustainable environmentally-friendly behaviors. These changes in behavior will lead to the reduction of waste and contaminants in the estuarine ecosystems that are part of the Cantera Peninsula. Youth participants will receive more than 60 hours of environmental education about the Clean Water Act and Solid Waste Disposal Act, learn waste management strategies, and acquire the tools to make informed decisions that promote sustainability.

Recipient: Scuba Dog Society, Inc.
Year: 2012
Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality, Farming and Fishing   

This project will address the environmental and public health threats posed by marine debris surrounding the Loiza coastal communities in Puerto Rico. The residents of Loiza will assess the barriers to protecting local waterways and soil from the illegal dumping of solid waste and address deficiencies in the current waste management services. Through a hands-on educational program including workshops and community forums, residents will learn to conduct environmental assessments, monitor environmental conditions, create a viable community recycling program and establish other safeguards against the negative effects of marine debris on waterways used for subsistence fishing and recreation.

Caribbean Environmental and Development Institute
Year: 2004
Farming and Fishing

The project will conduct socio-cultural research to develop a culturally-relevant health communication model. The model will provide information about ways to prevent exposure and reduce risk from the harm associated with the organic, chemical and heavy metal compounds/ substances found in fish and seafood from the San Juan Bay Estuary System. The goals of the research will be to gather the necessary cultural data to: (1) increase awareness of fish contamination and prevention measures; (2) isolate data gaps in the information about the complex socio-cultural environment of fish consumption among the resident population at the San Juan Bay Estuary System; (3) develop a collaborative relationship between public health researchers, community advocates, and health care professionals serving the affected communities, and (4) acquire the information needed to foster behavior changes among the vulnerable populations at risk from potential exposure(s).

University of the U.S. Virgin Islands
Year: 2002
Community Resiliency

The project, titled Linking Virgin Islands Grass Roots to Environmental Equity, will consist of a series of workshops and local initiative projects that will address several environmental justice issues identified through previous community interactions. Specifically, the project will directly impact teachers and leaders from low-income communities and culturally diverse areas within the Virgin Islands through a series of workshops on environmental justice issues. Over the period of seven weeks, the participant group will attend weekly workshops, and each member will be required to develop a community initiative project addressing one of the environmental justice issues discussed. After the workshop series, participants will have six months for the implementation and completion of their community initiative project. At the end of one year, ten new community-based initiatives will be established. Speakers for the workshop series will consist of scientific, planning and outreach specialists within the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

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Rhode Island
 

Groundwork Rhode Island
Year: 2017
Water Quality, Solid Waste

Central Falls, RI is one of the most densely populated areas in New England and suffers from localized flooding along with little greenspace and tree cover. To address this, GWRI proposes to work closely with Central Falls High School to develop a youth-based environmental program focused on stormwater management, green infrastructure, public green space, trees, and solid waste disposal. Students will receive training from a Landscape Architect, Urban Planner, and related professionals on design, master planning, urban sustainability, and related issues. Students will conduct outreach to Central Falls residents and, based on community input, will then design a Community Greening Plan to include developing three demonstration projects on green infrastructure.

Childhood Lead Action Project
Year: 2017
Toxic Substances

Childhood Lead Action Project's Lead-Safe Blackstone Valley initiative will work strategically in three of Rhode Island's high risk communities to reduce the incidence of childhood lead poisoning, improve the safety of rental housing, and increase the capacity of Central Falls, Pawtucket, and Woonsocket residents to address lead issues in their communities. These cities have a very high incidence of lead poisoning and are home to substantial low-income/minority populations. Lead-Safe Blackstone Valley project activities include promoting effective lead prevention practices, developing Lead 101 and worker safety trainings, and providing training and technical assistance.

Environmental Justice League of Rhode Island (EJLRI)
Year: 2016
Asthma and Air Pollution Mitigation

The two-year asthma hotspot action plan project will work with the residents in the South Providence, Elmwood and Washington Park neighborhoods impacted by the Port of Providence, where air pollution and high rates of asthma are prevalent. The project will connect families dealing with asthma to free services to improve their health, knowledge, and environmental conditions. Project activities, including individualized outreach to residents, community workshops and meetings, and leadership development trainings, will result in the following: 1) increasing residents’ knowledge about the sources of air pollutants and their impact on health; 2) engaging impacted residents in processes to investigate, survey, and monitor air pollution; and 3) developing actionable recommendations to reduce the community’s exposure to pollutants. An asthma hotspot is an area where there is high incidence and prevalence of asthma, as well as very high rates of asthma related emergency department visits.

Childhood Lead Action Project, Inc.
Year: 2015
Toxic Substances

The goal of the project is to work strategically in one of Rhode Island's highest risk communities to reduce the incidence of childhood lead poisoning by increasing the capacity of Central Falls residents to address the presence of lead based paint in their local community. The project will: 1) provide community based education on lead poisoning prevention and tenant rights; 2) coordinate committees of stakeholders in Central Falls to advocate for improved implementation of current laws and regulations regarding lead-based paint in the City, in particular RI’s Lead Hazard Mitigation Act (“LHMA”) and the Federal Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (“RRP”); 3) train contractors on lead-safe work practices through RRP training, and 4) provide training and technical assistance to Central Falls building and code enforcement officials on implementation of the LHMA and RRP. The Childhood Lead Action Project (Project) will partner with four organizations - the Blackstone Valley Community Action Program, Rhode Island Medical-Legal Partnership, RI Department of Health, and Progreso Latino - in a comprehensive and coordinated effort to have the greatest environmental health impact.

Environmental Justice League of Rhode Island
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Job Training

The "Community-Based Home Weatherization in Providence" Project will take place in Providence, Rhode Island. Activities include training residents to perform basic home energy evaluations and home weatherization tasks and then to host several barn raising events. The goal is to provide outreach and education to homeowners and tenants about the benefits of residential weatherization as well as provide opportunities for individuals receiving job training in related fields to participate in energy efficiency efforts.

Providence Community Opportunity Corporation
Year: 2010
Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

The "Public Housing Recycling for Elderly/Disabled" Project will take place in Providence, Rhode Island. Activities include providing education and outreach about solid waste, recycling, and its effects on the environment, creating recycling centers in Providence Housing Authority's high rise developments, and working with elected floor captains to collect recyclable materials. The goal is empower public housing residents to improve and impact the local environment by reducing solid waste, diminishing carbon emissions, and reducing toxic materials.

Rhode Island Legal Services, Inc.
Year: 2008/ 2009
Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

Conducting a ten week class for 15 youth from the Hartford Park Public Housing Project in Providence, Rhode Island. Participating youth will create two 30-second public service announcement videos (one in English and one in Spanish) on the threats to human health posed by common household cleaning products and a 5-minute video on how solid waste and trash contribute to poor living and health conditions in low-income neighborhoods.

Southside Community Land Trust (SCLT)
Year: 2005
Farming and Fishing

SCLT will provide a practical, safe and affordable solution to the environmental and public health constraints placed on a school garden built on the site of a former municipal solid waste dump. The project partners will plan and construct a safe, affordable off-ground garden structure, and share its designs and curriculum with local educators and community members wanting safe alternatives to deal with environmental and public health issues at the site. SCLT is dedicated to assisting communities in becoming more self-sufficient and improving their quality of life through: 1) promoting and implementing community gardening; 2) providing access to locally grown food; 3) facilitating environmental education; and 4) catalyzing solutions for related community needs. Partners include the Olneyville Community Schools Initiative, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, City of Providence, Rhode Island Department of Health, Springfield Middle School, The Hartford Park Tenant‘s Association and a registered landscape architect.

Rhode Island Legal Services, Inc. (RILS)
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances

RILS will conduct a research project that will result in the development of two new policy documents for the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RIDEM). The policy would affect two major environmental justice issues: (1) The siting of schools on sites contaminated by hazardous substances; and (2) RIDEM’s evaluation of issues of environmental equity for low-income and minority persons when reviewing cleanup proposals. The policy documents will be developed by two stakeholder groups set up by RIDEM. RILS’s goal is to strengthen low-income and minority involvement in the stakeholder process.

Paddle Providence, Inc.
Year: 2000
Water Quality

Paddle Providence will educate inner-city youth and their families about the environmental and public health issues related to degraded waterways. Funds will be directed toward enhancement of community understanding by providing summer boating programs as a tool to promote safe recreational uses of the river and parks. The project will also promote collaboration among community organizations to exchange communication and educational information among the stakeholders to address disproportionately high and adverse environmental risks faced by residents, while building community support and environmental stewardship.

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South Carolina

Gills Creek Watershed Association
Year: 2015
Farming and Fishing, Water Quality

This project will investigate the potential presence of mercury in fish within Gills Creek and then effectively communicate those findings and the related health effects to the surrounding communities of Arthurtown, Washington Park, Little Camden, Starlite, Eastway Park, Sims, and Bluff Estates. The Gills Creek Watershed is already one of the most impaired urban watersheds in South Carolina with five different sites listed as impaired, according to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, due to high fecal coliform levels, low dissolved oxygen, and/or the inability to support a balanced, indigenous aquatic community.

Anderson County, South Carolina
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances

This project is a comprehensive, multi-media campaign to inform the public in general, as well as identify at risk groups and inform them of the threats of personal health and safety issues that can arise from the improper use of common household chemicals. This project will involved the dissemination of information through brochures, newspapers, radio, television, billboards, and a website regarding the improper use of common household chemicals. The development of the materials for printed brochures, newspaper advertisements, website, and billboards will be handled by the Anderson County Public Information Office in conjunction with AnMed Health Marketing Department. Radio and television advertisements and public service announcements will be developed by the AnMED Health Multimedia Department in cooperation with Tri-County Technical College. The materials will be tested for effectiveness on a focus group consisting of clients from the Westside Community Center. The Center offers various services to low-to-moderate income persons of all backgrounds. Anderson County will partner with local emergency responders and the regional poison control center in maintaining data for performance measurements. An initial round of media and material distribution will begin in late Fall of 2010, with a second round to follow in late Spring 2011.

A Place for Hope, Inc.
Year: 2008/ 2009
Community Resiliency

Creating a Healthy Community Action Plan Committee (HCAPC) with residents from the Blackmon Road Community in York County, SC. Through a series of committee meetings and an environmental professional training, the committee will create a Community Needs Assessment that will compliment and contribute to a County led Neighborhood Master Plan. These meetings will help in refining and implementing the project goals and objectives of identifying current and needed resources, partnerships, and actions that need to take place among residents and outside stakeholders, and evaluating their progress. Two trainings will consist of a local environmental conference and a regional healthy housing.

Bethlehem Baptist Church
Year: 2005
Toxic Substances

On January 6, 2005, a train wreck resulted in a punctured 90-ton tanker car filled with chlorine gas, which leak into the community. The purpose of this project is to provide more information to the citizens within Graniteville about air and the toxic substances that relate mainly to chlorine. through workshops. The workshops would focus on the citizens concerns about the health effects of chlorine and other toxic substances transported through their community, as expressed during town meetings sponsored by the Graniteville Community Coalition and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. Partners include the Center for Disease Control, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, the University of South Carolina, Arnold School of Public Health, and the Medical University of South Carolina.

Sewee to Santee Community Development Corporation
Year: 2005
Water Quality

As a pilot project, the Corporation will train the citizens of Germantown in the care and maintenance of their septic and potable water systems and identify inspection and maintenance ordinances and/or regulations for Charleston County and the state of South Carolina. As a result, recommendations will be provided to Germantown, for drafting ordinance language, establishing protocols for a model onsite/decentralized wastewater management inspection and maintenance program. This project will also repair or replace several failed septic systems to protect the portable water supply and surface and ground water. Partners include the Howard African Methodist Episcopal Church, Bethel AME Church and the Germantown Neighborhood Association.

Union Heights Community Council
Year: 2001
Solid Waste Disposal

The project, Children Learning about the Environment and their Neighborhood (CLEAN), proposes to involve the youth of the Union Heights community in helping to create a safer and healthier environment in their neighborhood. Substandard houses in the community have been demolished. The demolition of these houses had a negative impact on the community because the lots have become a magnet for trash, illegal dumping and overgrown landscaping. Project CLEAN will involve the youth of Union Heights in: (1) improving the appearance of 66 vacant lots; (2) developing a pollution prevention strategy to help keeps the lots clean and safe and (3) conducting environmental awareness workshops.

Youth Service Charleston, Inc.
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The project plans to engage middle school youth and their adult leaders in addressing local environmental problems in the Charleston Enterprise Community area. The project will train educators about environmental justice concerns, and how to guide students’ exploration of environmental justice issues in their communities. The project also proposes to provide youths with a fact based, structured, and balanced process to research, understand, and work within their community for fair and equitable enforcement of environmental public policies and private practices.

ReGenesis, Inc.
Year: 2000
Solid Waste, Toxic Substances

The Arkwright/Forest Park Environmental Justice Project will support three research projects on the IMC fertilizer plant and Arkwright Superfund landfill sites. The project will continue and expand existing research on health surveys of residents, former employees and families of the Superfund sites. The result will be disseminated to residents through a monthly newsletter.

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South Dakota

Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation
Year: 2010
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Farming and Fishing, Job Training

The project is located on the Pine Ridge Reservation and has three goals. The first is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and empower community youth by building a demonstration photovoltaic solar generation project at an all-electric community building; reducing community energy use; and providing training and community education on these topics. The second goal is to increase community capacity to adapt to climate change and a drier, hotter climate by giving youth experience with organic gardening and rooftop water collection and by providing community education. The resulting vegetables will be given to community elders, providing public health benefits. Third, the project will increase public education about “green economy” jobs and employment in green industries by holding an open house involving regional green businesses and colleges that provide training for green jobs.

Great Plains Restoration Council
Year: 2003
Water Quality

This project will seek to clean up White Horse Creek, by working to remove cattle from the immediate watershed, especially where pens contribute to waste runoff. The cattle industry is one main contributor to water pollution on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The community, members of the Wahancaka Yapi tiospaye, will also be organized to clean up debris and trash currently clogging up additional points of the creek. This effort is focusing on at least the 5 miles of White Horse Creek upstream of Mendelson Valley. White Horse Creek is used in a variety of ways. It is used by Oglala Lakota children to swim in, for cultural ceremonies, the native prairie wildlife relies on the creek for survival, and some residents draw and filter water from the creek for human drinking.

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Tennessee

Community Development Corporation of Greater Memphis
Year: 2013
Air Quality

“Livable Memphis’ REAL Places” plans to address the negative effects of urban sprawl and automobile dependence in inner-city neighborhoods in Memphis, Tennessee. Through a series of workshops, area residents will research their neighborhood’s development patterns and learn how air pollution has resulted in disproportionate rates of asthma and economic disparity. Workshop participants will apply their knowledge through an environmental assets and liabilities survey of their neighborhood. Accordingly, residents will analyze their survey results and learn skills to advocate for change by organizing neighborhood campaigns to convert current liabilities into assets.

Kingsport Citizens for a Cleaner Environment
Year: 2003
Community Resiliency

The goal of this project is to involve the residents of the community in the critical analysis of particular elements of the environmental health in their neighborhood. The residents will also document the history of how the land was used before its residential development. The objectives to be achieved are: (1) designing and conducting a health assessment survey, (2) Training residents to survey fellow residents, and (3) Involving local residents in discussion and development of possible resolution to current environmental issues as they are presented to the community.

Vollintine-Evergreen Community Association (VECA) CDC
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

In 1982, Cypress Creek was designated a Superfund site by the State. Chemical contamination of Cypress Creek from the release of process wastewater by local industries occurred between the 1940s and the 1980s. Based on the history of Cypress Creek, VECA believes a third-party assessment of the local industries study is needed. An assessment, written and presented by an independent evaluator in terms that can be easily understood, will give residents the necessary understanding to utilize the study’s conclusions. The project will produce a written report and a community conference to present the evaluator’s finding to stakeholders.

University of Tennessee
Year: 2002
Water Quality, Community Resiliency

Chattanooga Creek Hazardous Substance Monitoring Program. This project will involve the detection and assessment of hazardous substances in the environment and relates to evaluation of the effects on and risks to human health from hazardous substances. The project will: (1) Collect and analyze water samples from the Chattanooga Creek. (2) Interpret data and prepare reports. (3) Conduct two public meetings to present findings before the community and public officials. (4) Train university and high school students from the impacted community in research techniques to address similar problems in the future.

Coal Creek Watershed Foundation, Inc.
Year: 2002
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

Technologies for Innovative Pollution Prevention Project. This project will address the environmental issues of water and soil quality as affected by illegal dumping and unregulated sewage disposal. The project will: (1) Develop effective communication plans. (2) Identify areas and types of most illegal dumping. (3) Hold two communities clean up days. (4) Train the community and teachers about recycling as an alternative to illegal dumping. (5) Conduct a survey of stakeholders to determine any existing communication flaws and their possible solutions. (6) Research ways to solve sewage problems.

Alton Park/Piney Wood Neighborhood Improvement Corp.
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

The Community Building Initiative for the Alton Park/Piney Woods Neighborhoods proposes to address the several environmental justice issues through this project. They are; (1) the daily contamination created by the abandoned commercial and industries properties of operating industries; (2) conducting research and monitoring activities related to indoor/outdoor toxic substances in and around the community and (3) through meetings, informing the community so that they can fully participate at the decision-making table.

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Texas

Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services (tejas)
Year: 2015
Community Resiliency

The purpose of this project is to work with key stakeholders of the Harrisburg/Manchester area - community residents, businesses, local government agencies, researchers, and first responders - to understand challenges in planning and preparing for disasters, to identify opportunities to reduce risk and impact, and to work together to gather information about potential hazards in the community. The goals of this project are to build community knowledge about disaster preparedness and to spur collaborations between various stakeholders that will lead to increased community resiliency.

Familias Triunfadoras, Inc.
Year: 2012
Water Quality, Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

The Familias Saludables Project is a culturally relevant, bilingual outreach and education project that will engage residents of Texas boarder communities and local government in an effort to address environmental concerns affecting the quality of life along the United States-Mexico Boarder region. These threats to human health include poor water quality, illegal dumping of wastes and toxic substances and incidents of lead and chemical poisoning. Specifically, the project focuses on communities lacking wastewater utilities and residents living in poor housing conditions constructed from salvaged materials. The project will train and educate residents about various environmental hazards, linking residents to governmental resources to aid in the reporting of illegal dumping and other threats to public health.

Austin Community Design and Development Center
Year: 2011
Air Quality, Water Quality

The Cottonwood Creek Environmental Justice Initiative aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and water pollution through community education and research efforts. The project will conduct surveys and studies relating to the causes and prevention of air pollution, particularly carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and the pollution associated with the burning of fossil fuels to produce electricity. Expected outcomes of the project include reduced CO2 emissions, reduced incidence of adverse health effects due to poor indoor air quality (particularly asthma), and mitigation of the threat to human health, local groundwater and creeks resulting from onsite sewage facility malfunctions.

Houston Advanced Research Center
Year: 2011
Community Resiliency

The Yates High School Camera Project seeks to engage communities by capturing images of environmental risks in Houston. This is a collaborative project with photography students at the historic Jack Yates high school, teachers, community members and TEJAS, a grass roots environmental justice group. Students will capture images of local environmental risks and share these pictures to spark conversation about the impact of environmental injustices on health and quality of life. Data profiles will be compiled for each photographed site to identify trends about the causes and effects of environmental threats. The images and findings will be shared with the broader community, including the media and local government representatives to work toward strategies that will preclude the recurrence of environmental injustice in minority neighborhoods across Houston.

Familias Triunfadoras, Inc
Year: 2010
Community Resiliency, Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

Project targets colonias in San Elizario, Clint and Montana Vista, designed to 1) build community knowledge and capacity of residents to effectively assess and monitor present and potential community environmental hazards through community outreach and education workshops, 2) develop leadership capacity among the residents and support the formation of "Environmental Justice Block Committees" in order to monitor illegal dumping; 3) develop a culturally relevant and bilingual social media campaign on environmental issues 4) develop a train-the-trainer curriculum and video production to inform colonia families lacking water and sewer on how to purify drinking water and how to maintain septic systems, why not use salvaged materials to build their home and the importance of enforcing illegal dumping laws 5) create a partnership forum that brings together community based organizations, health offices and universities to monitor ongoing potential hazards in the colonias. Project targets colonias in San Elizario, Clint and Montana Vista who do not have water or wastewater utilities and those living in poor housing conditions that use salvaged construction materials to build their homes.             

City of Alton
Year: 2008/ 2009
Community Resiliency

Improving and promoting healthy environments through utilizing promotoras (indigenous community health workers). The recipient plans to build on the infrastructure of Alton and the Center for Community Health Development (CCHD) history of training and educating Alton colonia residents on key environmental issues. The project combines the expertise of the City of Alton, Texas, the Texas A&M School of Rural Public Health and CCHD in Alton colonias in Hidalgo County, located in deep South Texas along the US Mexico border.

Border Fair Housing and Economic Justice Center
Year: 2006/ 2007
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

The Border Fair Housing and Economic Justice Center intends to implement its Colonias Sanas Initiative (CSI), or Healthy Communities Initiative, throughout the colonias in El Paso County, Texas and Doña Ana County, New Mexico. Specifically, CSI will address perhaps the most pressing needs in the US/MX border region; water pollution reduction, safe and potable water, promoting proper solid waste disposal, improving air quality, controlling toxic substances and unsafe household pesticides. The project will establish a Regional Environmental Consortium (REC) consisting of organizations that, while very diverse, directly deal with the issues of environmental justice in the proposed service area at the grassroots level through their direct involvement in the colonias. REC will develop a bilingual colonia-specific training curriculum. Upon its completion, REC will continue to serve CSI in an important advisory capacity as it seeks to expand the project into other colonias along the US-Mexico border.

Old Acres Homes Citizen’s Council
Year: 2005
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

This project will involve the research of various un-permitted landfills in the community and their potential effects on water quality, water safety and drinking water. The project includes the following activities; 1) Geographical identification of past landfill sites through maps provided by the City of Houston Planning Department; 2) Documenting the current land use of the sites by community volunteers who will visit the site and observe the current land use; 3) Identifying the directional flow of ground water from the sites through observations and assistance from the University Environmental Health Department and 4) Educate students on the concepts related to research sampling of water and soil for contamination.

Greater Austin First Tee
Year: 2003
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The project will work with the youth on the following efforts: (1) implementation of an innovative Turf Management and Water Resources Protection Plan; (2) collaboration with the City of Austin and its effluent water re-use program; (3) redevelopment of a closed municipal solid waste landfill; (4) creation of an open space and nature preserve in a neighborhood that lacks such facilities; and (5) education of the TFTGA participants, their families, partner schools and organizations as well as the surrounding neighborhoods about the benefits of environmentally friendly use and maintenance of public open space. The First Tee of Greater Austin’s (TFTGA) Green Space Management and Water Re-Use Program provides TFTGA the opportunity to use its newly developed golf-learning center site for several environmental initiatives. The First Tee is a nonprofit organization that reaches out to under served youth in Austin. TFTGA deliberately chose to construct its first golf-learning facility in East Austin, an under served area of metropolitan Austin, which included a closed municipal solid waste landfill, as an example of successful redevelopment.

Old Acres Homes Citizens Council
Year: 2002
Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality, Air Quality

A solid waste landfill has been a source of concern in this Houston neighborhood. Water and other substances have seeped from the dumpsite into neighborhood backyards for several years. Because of poor drainage, the homes often flood. A forging company is also a potential health hazard because the plant emits fumes that are possibly toxic. High rates of cancer and asthma have been reported. The project seeks to identify any potential hazardous material coming from the landfill, as well as lead or heavy metal contamination in air emissions coming from Valley Forge. Partnerships with community groups, schools, and the UT Houston School of Public Health will enable extensive research to be conducted, such as the following: a community health survey, a literature review about contaminants, a historical review of the site, and an analysis of the landfill components and the Valley Forge sites. The data obtained will be used to inform the community and to seek solutions to these environmental problems. Target: the community is 72% African American, 8 % Hispanic, and 4% other ethnic groups. 29% falls below the poverty level, and the median income falls fare below that of the state median.

Communities for a Better Environment (CBE)
Year: 2002
Air Quality, Community Resiliency

CBE will work with Southwest Network for Economic and Environment Justice (SNEEJ) and other local organizations to train community residents to effectively monitor and reduce exposure to toxic air pollution in the Austin, Texas area by means of the “Bucket Brigade” model. Two technical assistance trainings will be held for representatives of several EJ organizations, and these representatives will, in turn, train the members of their organizations. They will be trained in air sampling and pollution prevention using well-proven techniques. The trainings will teach participants how to gather and analyze air, water and soil samples. Participants will then be trained on interpreting the air sampling data and to identify the industrial processes that pollute their environment. Target: Austin, Texas area (predominantly African American and Hispanic population).

Casa de Colores
Year: 2001
Water Quality

The Esperanza Unida Environmental Justice Project are youth-oriented community outreach programs providing training on conducting surveys, identifying resources and to enhance critical thinking skills and problem solving. Workshops will focus on the long journey of the Rio Grande and the associated environmental conditions pertaining to human health. Support materials, maps, visual aids and printed materials will be developed for the workshops and outreach effort. After the training, a door-to-door survey of the three communities will be conducted in order to determine what their environmental understanding and needs are. The materials and information will be offered to all residents, as well. This project will promote the development of environmental leaders about the youth so that they can continue the struggle in the future to confront environmental issues affecting the area and to focus on the Rio Grande.

Clean South Dallas/Fair Park, Inc.
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Water Quality, Community Resiliency

The Earth Camp is an innovative classroom and summer camp program providing hands-on environmental education to primarily low-income elementary school students. Students will learn about the clean air and water statutes and participate in air/water quality testing and participate in fall and spring clean-up campaigns. They will develop posters and brochures to disseminate the information they have learned. The learning activities will be conducted in eight South Dallas/Fair Park area schools, and the project will culminate in the Earth Camp 2002, when the students who are selected competitively will explore the Trinity River and the natural habitat of the South Dallas area during the two-week camp.

Community Action Agency Project Bravo
Year: 2001
Community Resiliency

The project “Environmental Justice in the Neighborhoods” will train 130 residents from sixty-five grassroots Neighborhood Improvement Associations (NIA). Through this training, residents will be empowered with the skills to participate in public debates on environmental issues; participate in committees, task forces and/or boards overseeing such issues; and the skills to seek redress on environmental issues concerning their communities. Each NIA will develop an Environment Plan of Action, identifies the issues and solutions to these problems in their community. Youth participation will be insured by selecting two to five students from each of the twenty-seven high schools and middle schools in El Paso County to serve on a Youth Council on the Environment. The students will attend the training as well as participate in four workshops.

Wesley Community Centers of San Antonio, Texas, Inc.
Year: 2001
Water Quality

“Screening for Health’s Sake” is a project involving the residents in the environs of Kelly Air Force Base (KAFB) in San Antonio. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) studies have shown that households over a plume of contaminated groundwater near the base have an increased number of deaths attributed to liver and kidney cancer and leukemia, as well as an elevated number of low birth weight babies and an excess of reported cases of heart and circulatory system defects. This project will research why the most-affected households do not seek the free health screening, and a community health profile will be taken of the residents at the same time to determine their attitudes about the relationship between the contaminated groundwater plume and their perceived illnesses. Using the results of the study, the volunteers of the Wesley Community Centers will produce a bilingual pamphlet explaining the details of the screening and encourage people to get screened. The project will target one hundred households in the contaminated area in which there will be door to door canvassing and community meetings.

Health and Environmental Risks Awareness Project
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The Health and Environmental Risks Awareness Project (HERAP) helps Vietnamese refugee families in the Houston, Texas area form Neighborhood Support Groups (NSG) which deliver information to hard-to-reach Vietnamese residents. Fifteen people from the NSGs are recruited and trained to become community environmental health advocates. Public education and information campaigns are conducted through information workshops and community events (such as the Lunar New Year Festival, Mid-Autumn Moon Festival, etc.), Vietnamese-language radio talk shows, and a monthly newsletter. The target community members consist of three thousand people in the area.

National Organization for Mexican-American Rights
Year: 2000
Solid Waste Disposal

The project analyzes illegal dumping problems in colonias outside Eagle Pass, Texas. A video about the colonias is used as an educational tool to teach residents about the environmental health hazards this creates and the necessity for the community to clean up their own environment. Workshops are held with the community to show the video and to discuss the findings. Using the bilingual video discussion guide, environmental concepts and the health hazards of solid waste are taught. A panel of community activists and environmental advocates will discuss how the community can be empowered to take action to clean up their own environment. The videos are given to schools, churches, etc.

Austin Community Gardens
Year: 2000
Farming and Fishing

The Blacklands Urban Demonstration Project: Austin Community Gardens will promote sustainable food gardening and micro-enterprise development in low-income Blacklands Neighborhood of Austin (60% minority: 33% African-American, 22% Hispanic, 5% Asian). In partnership with many organizations, including Americorps/VISTA, the project will create a community-based demonstration project to educate residents about the value of their land and how to protect it. Water conservation and pollution prevention will also be promoted. Organic wastes will be recycled on site. The project will build community capacity and facilitate stakeholder communication by holding many small classes and workshops about sustainable development and “smart growth.”

Southeast Houston Cleaner Communities for Better Health
Year: 2000
Air Quality, Toxic Substances

In southeast Houston near the Geneva Superfund site, this project will build community capacity to identify local environmental justice problems through several educational events, including Internet classes, bus tour of pollution sources, and an environmental justice workshop. Research that has been conducted on health risks of hazardous waste will be communicated to the community, and assessments on the community members’ health history will be taken. A particular focus will be establishing and assisting with an environmental club at a new high school built near grandfathered facilities. Ninety-five per cent of the students are low-income Hispanics. The students will study the effects of air emissions from these facilities and hazardous waste near the Superfund site. This neighborhood is located near the heavily-industrialized Houston Ship Channel and the population is primarily low-income Hispanic.

Esperanza Environmental Justice
Year: 2000
Toxic Substances

Environmental justice assessments will be conducted in the east San Antonio neighborhoods adjacent to the Tessman Road landfill and the Martinez Creek watershed, which surround the Aztec Superfund site. The health risks associated with hazardous wastes, lead, barium and landfill gas exposure will be communicated to the community by means of a Web site to be developed and a workshop. Environmental justice concepts will also be taught to the residents. A network of community-based organizations will participate in the project. The community is composed primarily of low-income African-American residents.

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Utah

Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment
Year: 2018
Air Quality and Wood-burning Fireplace Retrofit

This project will focus on improving the air quality of Summit County, Utah, a rural area in northern Utah that is subject to severe winter inversions.  First, the project team will launch an intensive education and awareness campaign targeting underserved populations in the community to address the environmental and health effects of wood smoke.  The proposed activities build on current local regulation with a multi-faceted approach to building the capacity of the community through strategic partnerships and the Environmental Justice Collaborative Problem-Solving Model, to initiate changes in knowledge and behaviors.  The project also includes a voluntary fireplace exchange program focusing on low and moderate-income residents in Summit County that would encourage participation by supporting most of the costs associated with removing and retrofitting a limited number of wood units.  20-30 households will be part of the exchange program.  Continual air emissions monitoring is also planned, which would allow the project team to identify target areas, evaluate progress toward goals, and determine when project milestones are met.

Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment
Year: 2017
Toxic Substances Control Act

Lead poisoning is a leading cause of preventable child health problems and only about 3% of Utah children are tested for lead. Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment’s Lead Safe Outreach Program aims to create a safe environment for children by educating the community and schools about the sources and health risks of lead poisoning, informing them about local programs for abatement, educating physicians about screening and the state requirements for blood lead level test reporting, providing information to the Lead Education and Screening Coalition, and sharing information from this coalition back to the community. Project activities include 1) community outreach events, 2) referral to lead screening programs, and 3) presentations at five local schools.

Comunidadas Unidas
Year: 2013
Community Resiliency, Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal

Comunidades Unidas will educate and empower members of the immigrant communities located on the west side of Salt Lake City. Residents will learn to effectively address environmental issues affecting area children and families including reducing hazardous wastes and toxic substances found in homes and community spaces. The goals of the project are to educate and train residents about the appropriate uses and disposal of household chemicals, the elimination of contamination and sanitation in community spaces, and how to utilize peer-based support to provide assistance to high risk families.

The Utah Society for Environmental Education
Year: 2012
Air Quality, Water Quality, Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal

This project educates University of Utah students interested in environmental justice to respond to pollution problems. The goal will be accomplished through the following actions: (1) providing a greater understanding of environmental justice by creating an environmental 18 justice simulation program; (2) engaging University of Utah graduate students in the analysis of previously conducted Rose Park needs assessments that will shape service learning projects; (3) engaging undergraduate students in service learning opportunities based on the needs assessment analysis; (4) ensuring the longevity of serving community needs by creating lasting partnerships between local service providers and students.

Repertory Dance Theatre (RDT)
Year: 2011
Air Quality

The Repertory Dance Theater uses the arts to educate Salt Lake City youth about impacts of air pollution. Repertory Dance Theatre plans to conduct ten Arts/Environmental Residency Programs in K-6 schools in the west and central areas of Salt Lake City and to use the arts to help students understand the impacts of air pollution on the environment their health. The project intends to produce innovative lectures, demonstrations and movement classes in 10 elementary schools. Kinesthetic learning will be used to examine air quality issues and encourage youth and their families to adopt healthy living practices. Participants will be guided through fun problem solving activities focusing on understanding the need for clean air and preventative methods to decrease pollution at home.

Utah Society for Environmental Education
Year: 2011
Solid Waste Disposal

The Utah Society for Environmental Education seeks to create waste recycling program for residents of Rose Park community. The mission of the project is to help alleviate improper waste management by the residents of Rose Park. Current waste receptacles and signage have been ineffective and the community lacks an understanding about the importance of recycling. The project will use information gathered in previous studies to create a waste/recycling education program that will meet the needs of the Rose Park Community and reduce the amount of waste violations in the streets.

Utah Society for Environmental Education
Year: 2010
Community Resiliency

The overall mission of the West Side Environmental Justice Project is to help identify and reduce environmental concerns and issues in the Rose Park area by forming community partnership, performing an environmental assessment, gathering community input, and providing education and environmental stewardship. The specific goals are to: 1) Bring together a Community Action committee for the Rose Park area; 2) identify and prioritize environmental health threats to the Rose Park community; 3) ensure that adults, families and children have access to information about these threats and the means to protect against them, no matter their primary language; and 4) promote practical means to remove or reduce recognized, serious threats that are not being addressed effectively.

Plateau Restoration, Inc.
Year: 2006/ 2007
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

The project is to address immediate threats of herbicide contamination in drinking water for residents of Castle Valley, Utah. It will reduce the need for herbicides by investigating and employing alternative methods of removal of Diffuse Knapweed and other noxious weeds and by educating residents of threats to water quality from herbicides. It will develop a Castle Valley weed management plan and coordinate a Weed Board consisting of landowners, Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, and State land managers and Grand County Weed Department to ensure long-term protection of the aquifer from herbicides. This group will educate residents about these issues through public workshops that include presentations by regional experts in herbicides and health effects.

Utah Federation for Youth, Inc.
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

This project focuses on the 900 South Rail Line Hazardous Substances Research in Salt Lake City. Youth project participants will: (1) receive training to help them to research what substances are being carried on the trains; (2) identify hazardous substances through visual and video recordings of placards on trains and through contact with Union Pacific representatives; (3) analyze recorded data and enter it into a computer database; (4) research the effects of a spill or accident involving each substance and what the implications would be for the surrounding neighborhood; (5) research what actions community members should take in the result of a spill or accident; (6) compile results and make findings available for presentations; (7) publish the results in a bound report; and (8) keep a journal of activities that will be used to create a model that can be used by youth nationwide conducting research in their own neighborhoods.

Utah Society for Environmental Education
Year: 2003
Air Quality

The goal of the project is to understand how air quality affects the communities on the west side of the Salt Lake Valley. The project will identify the air quality concerns of the community and how to address these communities to combat the air quality problem. This will be achieved through developing partnerships with individuals involved in these communities, developing and conducting a research survey of at least 200 people to determine the extent to which community members are aware of and knowledgeable about air quality issues. The results of the research will be made available to the public.

Utah Federation for Youth, Inc.
Year: 2002
Solid Waste Disposal, Water Quality

This PeaceTrees 2003 program involves 60 young people from diverse cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds in the Glendale Area of Salt Lake City. The youth participants will facilitate a community-wide Waste Disposal & Reduction & Water Quality Awareness Campaign. This campaign includes a community day out, performing restoration work along the bank of the Jordan River and clearing away thistle and other noxious weeds, planting 500 bank and water plants at Decker Lake, participating in 2-tier train-the-trainer programs, and facilitating youth involvement in Utah’s coalition of organizations to better maximize resources regarding youth participation in water quality concerns.

Utah Society for Environmental Education
Year: 2001
Solid Waste Disposal, Air Quality

This grant will focus on health concerns being raised over the processing of tires at the Tire Disposal and Recycling Center located in a low-income residential neighborhood in the Salt Lake Valley. The proposed “Tire Dust Project” will evaluate the health impacts of this facility and educate residents of one of Salt Lake’s lowest income communities, providing them with the skills needed to address environmental justice issues related to clean air and solid waste disposal. The project will help the residents evaluate and address their primary health concerns about their local air quality. Addressing the environmental justice concerns will empower the residents to take pride in their community and take action to improve their air quality.

Utah Federation for Youth, Inc.
Year: 2000
Renewables and Energy Efficiency

Peace Trees, 2001 Phase IV will recruit 60 culturally diverse young people—14 to 18 years old—under the direction of the Utah Federation for Youth. The group of young people will be involved in: 1) installing solar powered lighting along pathways on a stretch if the Jordan River; 2) disseminate information in the low-income target community regarding renewable energy sources in English, Spanish, and Tongan; 3) facilitate a day of workshops and demonstrations to show methods and resources for solar and other renewable energy sources; 4) perform restoration work along the bank of the specified stretch of the River; 5) plant 1,000 seedlings in Millcreek Canyon; and 6) receive training in the environmental best practices, communication, multi-cultural success, conflict resolution, and leadership.

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Vermont

Strafford Historical Society (SHS)
Year: 2005
Toxic Substances

SHS will create a one-hour documentary and two 20-minute documentaries on the environmental concerns associated with three copper mines in Orange County, VT, including the history of the mines and the combined work of citizens and the EPA to clean up the mines. SHS has been an active member of the Elizabeth Mine Superfund Site Community Advisory Group, which represents the citizens of the town in communicating with the EPA about the contaminated former copper mining site. SHS is an all-volunteer organization with a small, dedicated core of individuals who focus on special initiatives. Partners are the Strafford Select Board, the State of Vermont’s Division for Historic Preservation and the Center for Environmental Health Sciences at Dartmouth College and local and state government agencies.

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Virginia

Boxerwood Education Association
Year: 2017
Air Quality, Water Quality, Solid Waste

Boxerwood Education Association will develop and pilot a replicable model that addresses the problem of how to advance citizen-level environmental stewardship in under-resourced rural or small-town populations. The pilot will target the town of Buena Vista, a former manufacturing town in economic decline and prone to flooding and water pollution. A primary component of the model is the creation of youth action teams who collaborate with small-scale, local community institutions such as churches, volunteer fire stations, and pre-schools. Project activities include: 1) recruiting at least 48 high/middle school students for the fall and summer action team programs, 2) Green Teams make public presentation/reports to at least five organizations in 2017-18, reaching at least 20 leaders directly and 500 constituents indirectly, and 3) the creation of a sustainable Green Team curriculum and toolkit for other organizations and communities facing environmental justice issues to replicate.

Greater Southeast Development Corporation
Year: 2015
Air Quality

This project aims to build an effective, resident-led partnership that uses community-based participatory research to address respiratory health effects of increased air pollution. Specific goals of the project are to: 1) create a resident-led coalition that will implement an educational program to improve the health of residents in the Southeast Community, Newport News, VA; 2) increase residents' awareness about respiratory disease; 3) increase residents' awareness about air pollutants associated with respiratory disease; and 4) develop self-care strategies for respiratory health. The project will build community partnerships, while hosting forums, workshops and a summer camp to disseminate scientifically sound and community specific information and to educate residents about respiratory disease risks, air pollutants and environmental stressors. Lastly, the project will assist residents with the development of common-sense, flexible approaches for sustaining self-care management as a long-term approach

Southeast Rural Community Assistance Project
Year: 2006/ 2007
Water Quality

The project seeks to reduce the community’s exposure to toxic water caused by high levels of fluoride in two wells that service the community. The project plan includes the development of a Community Committee, whose focus will be on training, educating and providing technical assistance to the affected community. The training will educate the residents about the environmental harms and health risks. Southeast RCAP will work with the committee its partners to develop solutions and assist the community in implementing these solutions.

Vietnamese Community Southeastern of Virginia, Inc.
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances

The Community Health Awareness Project’s focus is Vietnamese refugees in Hampton Roads, VA. The community lives in old buildings which are subject to high levels of carbon monoxide and lead. The project’s goals are to raise health risk awareness, identify and assess pollution sources, and recruit and train environmental and health community advocates. The goals will be met by health advocate training, information workshops held at local organizations, a Vietnamese-language newsletter mailed to the specific families, and flyers/brochures.

White Rock Hill Neighborhood Council, Inc.
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances, Job Training

The Lead Poisoning Prevention Program targets an inner city neighborhood in Virginia for lead poisoning prevention and remediation of lead hazards. The project involves educating and training neighborhood youth and their families about childhood lead poisoning and how to follow-up on lead remediation efforts that have already been established and implemented. The project uses various forms of interaction, education, and communication to fulfill its goals. This project is part of a long-term economic development plan for the community that incorporates training adults in job and life skills.

Boat People S.O.S., Inc. (BPSOS)
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances, Community Resiliency

In 1999, the Environmental Protection Agency funded BPSOS to form the Health and Environmental Risk Awareness Project (HERAP). Under the guidelines of HERAP and renewed grant funding, the organization plans to reach out to the Vietnamese community in Northern Virginia and educate them on the dangers of contaminant exposure. Because of the cultural and language barriers of these communities, many residents are unaware and unable to learn of these risks on their own. The strong ties that BPSOS shares with the community are an effective means of breaching cultural barriers. In turn, they will be able to accomplish the following goals with this new project: 1) raise awareness about the health risks associated with carbon monoxide, radon, and lead; 2) identify and assess pollution sources of radon and lead; 3) undertake tests and screening to assess risk; 4) recruit and train environmental health advocates for the community; and 5) build partnership among community leaders, health advocates, health professional, representatives of health institutions, and policy makers.

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Washington

El Centro de la Raza
Year: 2016
Air and Noise Pollution

The Beacon Hill Environmental Health Collaboration is a community empowerment project that aims to improve the neighborhood’s environmental health through educational outreach, engagement, and capacity building. The project will inform Beacon Hill’s diverse residents about the neighborhood’s air and noise pollution issues and engage community leaders in addressing these problems. The neighborhood is located in close proximity to high traffic roadways and two airports and experiences the highest infant mortality rates and deaths due to diabetes and stroke, as well as elevated rates of childhood asthma hospitalizations and significantly higher chronic lower respiratory deaths than other Seattle areas. The project will be implemented in a cross-culturally and linguistically-competent manner to ensure inclusive engagement for improving the health of as many residents as possible. Key project activities include: 1) consolidating information about Beacon Hill’s air and noise pollution and public health; 2) developing easy-to-understand training materials and conducting community meeting/training sessions; 3) summarizing and disseminating community feedback and technical findings; and 4) implementing at least two mitigation efforts to improve air and noise quality resulting, ultimately, in improved overall community health.

Seattle Tilth Association
Year: 2015
Water Quality, Fishing and Farming

The South King County Just Garden Project will include the following environmental activities: 1) teaches residents how they can work to reduce pollution within the greater Puget Sound watershed and especially in the already stressed Green-Duwamish watershed by building healthy soil, reducing lawn and garden inorganic fertilizers and pesticides and reducing stormwater runoff; 2) provides an opportunity to improve the health of low-income, diverse residents by helping them grow healthy food for their families without causing environmental harm; 3) emphasizes locally grown food with a low-carbon footprint, keeping food accessible and safe and in the hands of the community; and 4) provides peer leadership and models behaviors that contribute to a healthy, more resilient community and environment. This project seeks to construct at least 90 garden beds in low-income residential complexes for families and organizations serving low-income populations in South King County.

Northwest Sustainable Energy for Economic Development
Year: 2015
Renewables and Energy Efficiency, Farming and Fishing

This project seeks to increase awareness and direct participation in renewable energy generation by agriculture producers through Renewable Energy Farm Walks. Farm walks are on-farm education events for farmers and other rural community members to learn about innovative farming practices. The proposed farm walk series will focus on the use of renewable energy technology. Though primarily farmer led facilitation, the information presented is complemented by the expertise of local resource people such as agricultural extension specialists, service providers, consultants, and other professionals. The goal of this project is to provide peer-to-peer education and resources regarding on-farm applications of renewable energy to farmers that are new to the idea and/or are in need of guidance on proper installation and usage.

Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition
Year: 2014
Water Quality

The “Duwamish Community Action for Clean Air” project seeks to address the harmful impacts of air pollution and disproportionate rates of asthma in the Duwamish Valley neighborhoods of South Park and Georgetown, which are among the lowest income and most diverse communities in Seattle. Through partnerships with the community, local government, universities, and public health agencies, Duwamish will work to mitigate negative health impacts by (1) compiling existing information about the sources of diesel emissions and other air pollutants in the Duwamish Valley (2) identifying and filling data gaps with new monitoring and mapping efforts, and (3) taking action to reduce exposure to air pollutants and the frequency and severity of asthma among local residents.

Spokane Tribe of Indians
Year: 2013
Air Quality, Water Quality

The Spokane Tribe of Indians will identify and investigate air and water pollution sources associated with elevated uranium and radionuclide levels found in drinking water inside homes, schools and offices on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The project will investigate the negative impacts these toxins have on human health and the environment and then identify options for addressing and mitigating these concerns. Data collection from the project will be used to inform federal agencies and educate members of the Tribe about the overall risk to the Reservation’s population as well as produce recommendations for sustainable remediation alternatives.

Environmental Coalition of South Seattle (ECOSS)
Year: 2013
Air Quality, Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal

ECOSS will implement a community-based, multi-cultural outreach strategy aimed at reducing exposure to indoor air pollution and thereby decreasing asthma rates for children in the Seattle metropolitan area. The organization’s outreach efforts will address the existing language barriers and cultural misconceptions that lead to the misuse of household chemicals, improper disposal of wastes, poor nutrition and lack of environmental information in the Seattle/Tacoma (SeaTac) area and Tukwila, focusing on areas with high rates of foreign born residents, poverty and refugees.

Center for Human Services
Year: 2011
Water Quality, Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal, Farming and Fishing

The “Family Support Sustainability Initiative” project promotes environmental education to minorities in North King County, WA. The project will conduct environmental education for people of color and immigrants in North King County, WA. The Center for Human Service’s goal is to work with 75 Spanish speaking adults at two low income housing units and educate them on harmful chemicals and the protection of water. They will educate on gardening, solid wastes and reducing greenhouse gas production.

Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition/ Technical Advisory Group (DRCC)
Year: 2011
Water Quality, Toxic Substances

The Duwamish Valley Cumulative Health Impacts Assessment project will conduct community based participatory research. DRCC will work with community partners to conduct cumulative health impacts assessments and host multilingual educational forums to report research results with community members. A white paper will be produced outlining disproportionate impacts of the environmental exposures, vulnerabilities and other determinants of health affecting the local community. Recommendations will be provided on Superfund cleanup and other risk reduction strategies to advise EPA and local governments on the Duwamish River Valley Superfund cleanup project.

Center for Human Services
Year: 2010
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

The Ballinger Sustainability Initiative will focus on promoting sustainability practices and climate change awareness though service learning, education, and workshops with the residents at Ballinger Homes, who are underrepresented in the sustainability arena. Ballinger Homes is a public-housing community in Shoreline, Washington. This diverse neighborhood of 110 families represent a mini United Nations of immigrants and refugees from Asia, Africa, and former Soviet Union. As residents of public housing, they are living with a very low income (30% of HUD Median Family Income). The majority of the residents are English Language Learners. We will investigate organic gardening, composting, toxins in the environment, and climate change. We will empower residents to make a difference in their community and promote sustainable choices.

Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association
Year: 2010
Water Quality, Air Quality, Farming and Fishing

Cultural and watershed impacts of invasive species on Tribes, communities and salmon.

The Common Waters/Common Roots project will accomplish successful on-the-ground riparian restoration projects within eight local watersheds – Deer Creek, Kwina Slough, Schell Creek, Silver Creek, Slater Slough, Smugglers’ Slough, and the Lummi and Nooksack rivers; all of which have a rich history of subsistence fishing by indigenous peoples of the Coast Salish tribes (including the Lummi Nation), but have been degraded by a combination of past land use practices and urbanization. This community-based streamside habitat restoration project integrates education and the voluntary involvement of tribal members and other community volunteers with hands-on restoration projects as a strategy for increasing community involvement and investment in protecting waterways, reducing the impacts of greenhouse gas emissions, and recovering wild salmonid populations in the Pacific Northwest. Through the Common Waters/Common Roots (CWCR) project more than 400 local citizens will work to remove non-native and invasive plant species, plant more than 5,000 native trees and shrubs, and maintain these restoration sites located right in their backyards; improving water quality, air quality, and more than 6,000 feet of spawning and rearing habitat for salmonids along these eight streams. Tribal members of the Lummi Nation, citizens of Whatcom County, the ecosystems of the seven watersheds, and the Endangered Species Act listed salmonids and other wild fish that call these waters home and will benefit for generations from this project.

Farm Worker Pesticide Project
Year: 2008/ 2009
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

Providing information to farmworkers, their families and communities on the public health impacts of pesticide exposures and actions they can take to protect themselves from exposure. Further, it aims to educate workers on mitigations and alternatives to pesticide use, while informing them about the public policy processes governing pesticide regulation. It will include intensive community outreach, development and enhancement of multi-sector networks at the community level and facilitating opportunities for meaningful involvement.

Environmental Coalition of South Seattle
Year: 2007
Air Quality

The identified issue for this project is exposure to toxic nail care products by nail salon workers and clients. The environmental result desired is a reduction in exposure to toxics from nail care products. ECOSS and their partners will achieve their desired goal by: (1) working with industry manufacturers and distributors to make less toxic nail care products more readily accessible to salon owners; and (2) educating nail salon owners, workers, and clients about the benefits of less toxic products, the health hazards of using more toxic products, and changes that individuals can make to minimize exposure so that these groups can make informed decisions to lessen their exposure to toxic products.

Farm Worker Pesticide Project (FWPP)
Year: 2005
Toxic Substances, Farming and Fishing

FWPP will address the environmental injustice of exposures to pesticides experienced by farm workers and their families who handle pesticides and are exposed through splashes, spills, and drift. FWPP seeks to support and empower farm workers and their families who are exposed to highly toxic pesticides. FWPP's goal is to make sure that the community has the information it needs to understand and address this problem by receiving: results of studies done in the community, data on potential health effects, notice of upcoming policy forums and how to participate, etc. FWPP wants to make sure the problems of the farm workers are visible and to ensure a seat at the table for their community. Partners include Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides (NCAP), Farmworker Justice Fund, Pesticide Action Network, The University of Washington Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health (PNASH) Center, Heritage University, The Institute for Neorotoxicology & Neurological Disorders, and Columbia Legal Services.

The Indochinese Cultural and Service Center (ICSC)
Year: 2005
Air Quality, Community Resiliency

The project goals will be to promote and sustain healthy SE Asian communities, and reduce the risks from environmental hazards in the home environments of SE Asian families--particularly focusing on parents with children as well as the elderly, and to strengthen the ICSC/Health department partnership after the grant project ends. ICSC will create an opportunity for SE Asians to participate in identifying and learning about environmental health hazards in their home environments; develop culturally appropriate strategies to reach out and educate the communities; disseminate language-specific educational materials to the SE Asian communities; strengthen and expand the collaborative partnership between ICSC, the Tacoma/Pierce County Health Dept. as well as with members and groups of the SE Asian communities concerning the environmental health hazards impacting them. Partners include the Tacomo/Pierce County Health Department.

International Marine Association
Year: 2003
Water Quality, Air Quality

The project involves research, investigations, experiments, demonstrations, surveys and studies relating to the causes, extent, prevention, reduction and elimination or control of pollution of the water and air in the Duwamish River Basin. This area is impacted by urban industrialization and toxic wastes. I'M a PAL will conduct river research, testing and studies by training local high school and college students to patrol, test, and monitor and report their findings. The purpose of the project is to teach students, communicate findings and provide information through community newsletters, river tours, and presentations to stakeholders.

Spokane Tribe
Year: 2003
Solid Waste Disposal

The project is to develop a community education and an information exchange campaign related to eliminating dumping, proper disposal and recycling. Educational materials will be developed and public meeting will be held.

Indochinese Cultural and Service Center
Year: 2002
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

This project will expand a successful two-year collaboration between ICSC and other organizations, agencies and the SE Asian community to educate the community about fish consumption, water quality and environmental justice. The work will focus on youth and elders in the community, using a “train the trainer” model, an inter-generational education approach. The youth will be trained and will develop a video to be used to teach elders in the community about appropriate, safe and sustainable shellfish harvesting practices.

Northwest Communities Education Center
Year: 2001
Air Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

Outreach to and education of Spanish-speaking communities to promote education, awareness, and compliance with clean air policies and solid waste recycling is the focus of this project. This will include helping the community to understand and comply with the Clean Air Act and the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

My Service Mind Of the Northwest
Year: 2001
Toxic Substances, Solid Waste

This project will address environmental pollution in the daily life of low-income Korean populations in Pierce, South King, Kitsap, and Snohomish counties; to educate about the dangers, proper use and disposal of household products; hazards of incorrect disposal; and the harmful effects of radiation. The project will serve to educate and promote critical thinking and action to develop and improve access to this information due to language barriers of affected community.

Quileute Indian Tribe
Year: 2001
Water Quality, Solid Waste Disposal

The project will improve awareness of environmental problems and alternative solutions related to water pollution and solid waste disposal in isolated tribal communities and promote ideas of stewardship and ecological problem solving.

Washington State University
Year: 2001
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

The project will broaden community understanding of agriculturally derived surface water pollution; generate GIS mapping products and data to assess agriculturally derived surface water pollution at the micro-watershed level; provide information to the communities on how to understand the various components of the project; assimilated information will be used to build a consensus toward new solutions for prevention of agriculturally derived water pollution; and focus on contaminants, and toxic substances in surface water.

Concilio for the Spanish Speaking
Year: 2000
Farming and Fishing

Concilo for the Spanish Speaking will develop a documentary to help educate the public, including the media and the nation’s elected officials, about the need and moral imperative to provide adequately for farmworkers. The documentary, to be entitled “The Hands That Feed You”, will focus on housing, health and education of farmworker families and on the environmental consequences of unrestrained agricultural growth.

Community Coalition for Environmental Justice
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

Using maps and GIS information, South Seattle residents will be able to obtain detailed geographic information about their neighborhoods. The information will allow grassroots groups to determine the extent of environmental hazards and the people who are most impacted by polluting facilities.

Korean Women’s Association
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The project will provide environmental related agencies to access the Asian Pacific Islander Community for training and volunteer resources. The API community will increase its capacity and establish a framework to engage in activities to address environmental justice and education issues.

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West Virginia

Friends of Deckers Creek
Year: 2018
Water Sampling and Monitoring with Citizen Science Training

Friends of Deckers Creek (FODC) will monitor fecal coliform and E. coli levels in the Deckers Creek Watershed, educate the public about the hazards of contamination and their rights under the Clean Water Act, and actively engage communities by involving them in the monitoring process and holding public forums on contamination issues.  Shaped by community input and expert advice from partners, the end result of the project will be the development of a stormwater best management practices implementation plan.  Program activities will include 1) the collection of fecal coliform and E. coli data from 337 sites over the first 12 months to identify major sources of pollution; 2) the training of 45 Citizen Scientists for fecal coliform sampling; 3) the development of a stormwater upgrade implementation plan with constructive engagement from relevant stakeholders and the community; 4) two public forums held to inform Morgantown residents about the results of the monitoring program and about water safety while inviting input on the stormwater implementation plan; and 5) a comprehensive education program reaching 650 young people ages 6-11 in Monongalia County to provide meaningful, hands-on outdoor conservation experiences while teaching about water safety.

Friends of Decker’s Creek, Inc.
Year: 2017
Water Quality

The Friends of Decker’s Creek (FODC) will coordinate environmental education workshops and field trips related to water quality within the local rural communities of Monongalia and Preston counties. These counties are home to large swaths of abandoned mine land that have contributed to water impairment in the area. FODC will lead tours of stream restoration projects, acid mine drainage remediation projects, water treatment facilities, and other areas within the watershed where environmental improvements are taking place. FODC will set dates for a minimum of 15 lessons, tours, and field trips that will have the participation of at least 375 local youth and will provide hands-on lessons regarding ecological concepts and the effects various nearby pollutants have on the environment.

Friends of Decker’s Creek, Inc.
Year: 2011
Water Quality

The Friends of Decker’s Creek educate local citizens on pollution monitoring and reporting. This project will educate local citizens on water polluting activities, and empower citizens with the training and equipment necessary to monitor their local streams and submit data to a citizen database. This program will help protect the Decker’s Creek watershed through prevention, reduction and elimination of water pollution. They plan to accomplish this through educational media and community symposiums.

Pocahontas County Commission
Year: 2010
Water Quality

This project will develop a Water Resource Management Plan for the county by developing stakeholder involvement, conducting a water resources inventory, assessing data needs and preparing a plan.

Southern Appalachian School
Year: 2008/2009
Toxic Substances, Water Quality

Providing literature, house calls and the opportunity for residents of rural coal camp communities to attend relevant meetings that will focus on the consequences of lead and mercury contamination in human bodies from dental work, construction materials, water supply and soil. In collaboration with partners and families, lead and mercury exposures will be identified and addressed.

Southern Appalachian Labor School (SALS)
Year: 2003
Toxic Substances

SALS will focus on awareness, testing and correction of lead and mercury poisoning conditions in coal-camp houses owned by low income families in rural West Virginia. The objectives of the project are to: (1) create awareness of conditions and consequences of lead and mercury contamination in the home; (2) arrange testing and /or investigation for lead and mercury presence and contamination in old coal camp houses; and (3) correct and/or mitigate the problems. Partners include HUDs Office of Lead Hazard Control and Fayette County Solid Waste Authority.

Greenbrier River Watershed Assn.
Year: 2003
Water Quality

This project seeks to improve the Greenbrier River Watershed by assisting community members in their efforts of data collection and water quality analysis. In addition, this project will help the community understand the reporting requirements of environmental and public health systems. The community residents will learn about NPDES permit reviews and GIS mapping. A Power Point presentation will be created and information from this project will become a part of an existing watershed video.

Greenbrier River Watershed Association

Year: 2002

Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

Greenbrier River Watershed Association’s project targeted audience are several communities; farmers, local and federal government, municipalities (sewage treatment) and local residents who use the water. They address two water quality issues. 1) Pollution of the Greenbrier river from the local sewage companies. 2) Pollution of groundwater and water from farming operations. To meet their goals the GRWA will give presentations and form GIS maps to reach their goal of educating the targeted audience on how they affect the waterways and how they can change their everyday routines to improve the conditions of the local waterways. Their desired outcomes will be 1) to analyze NPDES permits, 2) find the licensees with the most problems, 3) inform the targeted audience of their problems and the possible solutions and 4) see if they need assistance with training and grant writing. They will measure their success by 1) evaluating the number participants in the targeted audience, 2) using analytical techniques to measure water quality improvements and 3) collecting more data to give to the general public for decision making.

West Virginia Citizen Action Group (WVCAP)
Year: 2000
Farming and Fishing, Toxic Substances

A critical deficiency exists in providing adequate warnings to residents who eat the dioxin-contaminated fish of the Kanawha River. Corporate interaction by the industries involved in the contamination has been limited as far as community education is concerned while on-going lawsuits and investigation continue to try to pinpoint and assign responsibility. The fact remains that dioxin exists, and those who are exposed need to be made aware of it. West Virginia Citizen Action Group plans to distribute information to affected residents along the Kanawha River in the format of a brochure and outreach program that aims to educate local residents how to lessen dioxin exposure in fish. This includes health risk information and innovative ways of preparing fish to reduce the amount of dioxin consumption. If successful, the program can be replicated in other cities throughout the region that share similar concerns.

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Wisconsin

Midwest Environmental Justice Organization (MEJO)
Year: 2017
Water Quality, Toxic Substances

MEJO will develop an interactive watershed mapping tool and educate the community on stormwater risks in an effort to reduce nonpoint source pollution to Starkweather Creek. The creek has been severely degraded from extensive channelization, urbanization, airport and industrial waste discharges, and non-point stormwater runoff. The project will also target minority subsistence fishers in the area and engage with them on contaminated fish consumption concerns. By hosting community meetings, in person discussions, and using current EPA stormwater materials, the project will engage and recruit local fishers to be part of the solution in reducing pollution to the creek.

Groundwork Milwaukee Inc.
Year: 2015
Water Quality

Groundwork Milwaukee will work with teens and young adults from the community area and train them about the impacts of local environmental stressors and the ability of green infrastructure (GI) to lessen their impacts. The young adults will be ambassadors to raise community awareness and knowledge of GI. Additionally, the water absorbing capacity of the land will be improved with rain gardens and absorbent trees. Outputs include: 15 rain gardens and 15 rain barrels installed and 500 residents reached through door canvassing and flyers.

Social Development Commission
Year: 2011
Toxic Substances, Air Quality

The “Lead Poisoning, Prevention and Remediation” project will reduce the environmental risks that impact children in Milwaukee. The project goal is to improve children’s environmental health by teaching parents of Head Start children the dangers and effects of exposure to lead. Children enrolled in Social Development Commission’s Health Start program will be tested for lead by a registered Lead Care II analyzer technician. The project seeks to educate families on how to assess their home environments and address relevant hazards, integrate lead reduction projects into homes owned by low income families with children under the age of seven, and promote the replacement of windows and window-frame dust barriers within the Social Development Commission’s Weatherization program.

Growing Power, Inc.
Year: 2010
Farming and Fishing, Job Training, Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal

This project will educate Milwaukee Southside families about lead issues and about growing organic vegetables and leafy greens to improve nutritional deficits and reduce lead blood levels in children. This project will provide green job preparedness and opportunity for local youth through sustainable urban agriculture. This project will educate and implement the composting of food waste which will be used to add fertility to urban gardens and demonstrate sustainable solid waste disposal.

Silver Spring Neighborhood Center
Year: 2010
Air Quality

This project will develop and implement an outreach campaign using education, social marketing, and a media campaign on Integrated Pest Management (IPM), asthma and the health risks of pests and pesticide use. This project will inform the Silver Spring Community and the general Milwaukee metro area of effective ways to implement IPM practices to improve the health of themselves and their families. This project will increase the number of community residents who are aware of IPM resources available to them, and their role in the IPM process.

City of Milwaukee
Year: 2008/ 2009
Water Quality

Establishing a training program that will increase residents’ awareness about the environmental impacts of urban populations on water in Milwaukee. It will include education and implementation of best practices on stormwater management, water conservation, while also increasing knowledge and understanding the impact of water issues on public health in Milwaukee. Training will be provided in English, Spanish, Hmong and Lao languages. A group of 15 resident Peer Educators will be formed who will facilitate 10 educational sessions in local schools, neighborhood based organizations and faith based organizations with a goal of educating 100 local residents.

Madison Environmental Justice Organization, Inc.
Year: 2006/2007
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

The primary purposes of this project are (1) to work with minority and poor subsistence anglers to better understand fishing and fish consumption practices on Madison’s Northside to identify social, communication, cultural, economic, and environmental factors that affect fish consumption in these communities, (2) to reduce the consumption of the most contaminated fish, while still encouraging the consumption of less contaminated, self-caught fish as a healthy local food source; (3) to build collaborative and effective partnership among minority and poor anglers, neighborhood associations, community centers, non-profit organizations, university scientists, and governments agencies that can effectively address fish consumption and water quality issues on Madison’s Northside and throughout the Madison area; and (4) to empower citizens and build community capacity to educate the community about fish consumption and water quality issues and work to improve these issues in the long-term.

Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC)
Year: 2003
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing
The project will collect whitefish samples from tribal fishermen. The samples will be tested for contaminants in laboratories, and the results published in tribal newsletters and disseminated during community meetings. Also, GLIFWC will utilize testing results to develop strategies to reduce toxic pollutants in Lake Superior through facilitating tribal participation in the Binational Program and International Joint Commission. This project will serve to address tribal concerns that contaminants in fish harvested from Lake Superior may pose health risks to tribal members, particularly young children and pregnant mothers.

Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife
Year: 2002
Water Quality, Farming and Fishing

Determination of PBT Contaminant Levels in Lake Trout Harvested by Tribes in the 1842 Ceded Waters of Lake Superior Project: This project will (1) gather information from the FDA and compare Federal statutes regulating PBT contamination for fish, beef, and poultry with fish advisories published by State, Tribal and Federal agencies for walleye harvested from Lake Superior waters; (2) establish a tribal database for GIS applications that compiles data on Lake Superior to identify PBT contamination levels and determine if locations targeted for harvest by tribal members require sampling; (3) analyze existing data and develop educational materials and fact sheets to effectively communicate information regarding PBT contamination in fish; (4) identify information shortfalls regarding fish contaminants to lakes speared and netted by tribal members and assist tribal governments to develop plans to undertake tribal testing programs to meet the needs of their respective Indian nations.

Menominee Tribe
Year: 2001   
Solid Waste Disposal, Toxic Substances

The Menominee will implement a household hazardous waste collection program. This project will also facilitate communication and environmental education of local residents and will encourage alternate use of non-toxic consumer products which promote waste minimization through pollution prevention education. This project will support the participation of two Menominee Nation College students to assist in education efforts in the reservation schools and to assist in the actual collection efforts.

Oneida Tribe
Year: 2000
Community Resiliency

The Oneida Tribe will research and draft an ordinance to establish a tribal environmental justice program as a component of the Environmental Impact Review responsibilities of the Oneida Environmental Quality Department. This project will incorporate the environmental justice principles of public participation, community involvement, and conflict resolution. Just as important, the project will make sure that it incorporates the traditional peoples’ consultation process into tribal decision making mechanisms, especially addressing concerns related to community involvement in development activities on the Oneida Reservation, such as housing, tribal economic projects, and roads.

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Wyoming

Wind River Alliance
Year: 2004
Water Quality

The purpose of this project, as a long-term goal, is to improve the public health of the residents of the Wind River Indian Reservation by reducing exposure to multiple environmental contaminants in the water and/or caused by the water resources of the Reservation. The objective is to improve public understanding of both contaminant threats and identify opportunities for remedy, so that citizens and officials can make informed decisions about the improvement of Reservation waters. Short-term objectives are to compile a comprehensive environmental report using data from a variety of agencies on surface and ground waters. The report will identify contaminants of concern and potential pathways of exposure. The report will identify institutional, policy and/or financial barriers to adequate management and remedy of problems. Recommendations for improving public health will be made, drawing from both the natural science and institutional barriers. The report findings will be widely disseminated throughout the Wind River community

City of Laramie, Public Works Department
Year: 2003
Water Quality, Toxic Substances

This project will include public education and outreach about safe drinking water, septic maintenance, and water well maintenance. Regular testing of well water and maintenance of septic systems is critical to ensure a safe, reliable supply of drinking water, free from contamination. The community residents in Albany County will learn the importance of maintaining septic systems and will be given discounts for septic system pumping and water quality analysis. This project will also help to support public education efforts to owners of private dumps by providing warnings and information about the potential negative health effects. As a follow-up to these education efforts, the project will also assist in the clean up efforts to remove these sources of toxic substances.

Northern Arapaho Tribe
Year: 2001
Water Quality

The goal of this grant is to provide environmental policies and guidelines from the Tribe to public and private sector representatives constructing clean water and safe drinking water systems on and near the Wind River Reservation. The policies and guidelines reflect the interest of the Northern Arapaho tribal members in the recovery of artifacts and specimens that pertain to American Indians. Tribal members have expressed concern that environmental information does not include provisions related to the recovery of American Indian artifacts and data. Tribal members believe that environmental justice not only include the right to clean air, water and soil, but also to the recovery and preservation of historical objects that may be uncovered because of environmental construction activity. If the Tribe can develop a program that implements environmental policies and guidelines at the front-end of clean water and safe drinking water projects, it is more likely to engage tribal members in the support of creating and sustaining environmental regulatory programs. This critical piece is currently missing in the present regulatory structure of the local area.

Wyoming Energy Council, Inc.
Year: 2001 
Air Quality, Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal

Wyoming Energy Council's (WEC) proposed project addresses health effects caused by environmental exposure to poor indoor air quality and potentially hazardous and solid waste in low income households in Carbon and Albany Counties in Wyoming, particularly those including young children or the elderly. WEC will join in partnership with local community organizations to mutually raise understanding of indoor pollution and its harmful effects. Members of such organizations will receive training and information that enables them to identify and help those low-income households with specific needs. Educational presentations will be made to all interested groups. Information on indoor pollution and hazardous toxic wastes will be provided through newspaper articles, public service announcements, and brochures and pamphlets. WEC will operate a toll free question and referral hot line.

Wyoming Energy Council, Inc.
Year: 2000
Air Quality, Toxic Substances, Solid Waste Disposal

Wyoming Energy Council’s (WEC) proposed project will address health effects caused by environmental exposure to poor indoor air quality and potentially hazardous and solid waste in low-income households in Carbon and Albany Counties in Wyoming, particularly those including young children or the elderly. WEC will continue to expand its community education services by making formal presentations to as many groups as possible. A minimum of 50 eligible, low-income households will receive direct assessment services to evaluate their indoor air quality. Many of the unsafe conditions discovered during evaluation and testing can be resolved through WEC’s weatherization program. In cases where this does not hold true, the occupants will be given a realistic work plan to be used as personal or community funds become available. Households found to have potentially unsafe chemicals will be advised on their proper storage and/or disposal.

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