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Implementation Status of the Lead Action Plan

Implementation Status of EPA Actions Under the 2018 Federal Action Plan To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts: Fiscal Year 2019

Implementation Status of EPA Actions Under the December 2018 Federal Action Plan to Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts
Fiscal Year 2019

ACTION

Q2 Accomplishments

Q3 Accomplishments

Q4 Accomplishments

More Information

GOAL 1: REDUCE CHILDREN’S EXPOSURE TO LEAD SOURCES

Objective 1.1. Reduce Children’s Exposure in Homes and Child-Occupied Facilities with Lead-Based Paint Hazards

Consider revisions, as
appropriate, to the dust-lead
hazard standards to address
childhood exposures to lead- contaminated
dust generated
from lead-based paint.

Consider changes to the post-abatement clearance levels consistent with the final revisions to the Dust-Lead Hazard Standards (DLHS).

Conducted rulemaking activities.

The DLHS final rule was completed and signed on 6/21/19. See EPA’s press release.

EPA is considering changes to the post-abatement clearance levels consistent with the final revisions to the dust-lead hazard standards

As a part of EPA’s efforts to reduce childhood lead exposure, EPA finalized a revision to the DLHS for floors and window sills. These standards apply to most pre-1978 housing and child-occupied facilities, such as daycare centers and schools. The final rule revised the DLHS from 40 µg/ft2 and 250 µg/ft2 to 10 µg/ft2 and 100 µg/ft2 on floors and window sills, respectively.

During the DLHS rulemaking process, EPA indicated it would review the dust-lead clearance levels at a later date. EPA is now considering changes to the post-abatement clearance levels consistent with the final revisions to the DLHS. To update the dust-lead clearance levels, EPA must take several steps such as conducting health, exposure and economic analyses.

Continue to implement regulations and other relevant authorities that require individuals and firms conducting lead-based paint abatement, risk assessment or inspection to be properly trained and certified, training programs to be accredited and these activities to be conducted according to reliable, effective and safe work practice standards.

Provided support to EPA, states,
tribes, federal agencies and the
public for implementation of these
regulations.

Conducted 638 compliance assistance and 317 outreach activities that supported abatement, risk assessment and inspection components of the Lead-Based Paint Program.

Conducted 355 compliance assistance and 685 outreach activities that supported abatement, risk assessment and inspection components of the Lead-Based Paint Program.

EPA provides annual funding to authorized states and tribal programs that administer training and certification programs for lead professionals and renovation contractors. Examples of activities include outreach, education, oversight and processing accreditation applications.

Increase the number (or percentage) of certified renovation firms capable of providing lead-safe renovation, repair and painting services through targeted outreach campaigns to contractors; continue to provide a nationwide list of certified renovation firms on EPA’s website.

Updated the list of certified renovation firms.

Conducted compliance assistance to increase the number of lead Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) certified firms.

Completed planning for a pilot project in six (6) cities to increase the number of RRP certified firms and trained contractors.

Conducted outreach and education activities to support the RRP Program.

Updated the list of certified renovation firms. A total of 1,874 new RRP firms were certified and 9,522 contractors received RRP training.

Conducted 495 compliance assistance activities to increase the number of RRP certified firms.

Completed a pilot project in six (6) cities to increase the number of RRP certified firms and trained contractors. During the project, EPA conducted outreach and education activities for 88 contractors to support the RRP Program.

Updated the list of certified renovation firms. A total of 1,843 new RRP firms were certified and 7,991 contractors received RRP training.

Conducted 709 compliance assistance activities to increase the number of RRP certified firms.

EPA provides annual funding to authorized states and tribal programs that administer training and certification programs for lead professionals and renovation contractors.

Objective 1.2. Reduce Exposure to Lead from Drinking Water

Revise the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) based on input EPA recently received from state, tribal and local partners, as well as the best available peer reviewed science, to ensure the rule reflects the best ways to improve public health protection and reduce levels of lead in drinking water.

Continued analysis to support preparation of a proposal for revisions to the LCR and supporting technical documentation.

Prepared a Federal Register Notice for proposed LCR revisions, accompanying technical support documents (including the Health Risk Reduction Cost Analysis) and the administrative record for submission by mid-August 2019.

Participated in EO 12866 review of the proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR) for LCR Revisions.

Enhance implementation of the LCR by engaging with state, tribal, local and other stakeholders to identify implementation challenges, best practices and tools to address these challenges.

Hosted a series of webinars on lead service line replacement. This series showcases best practices for states and utilities implementing a voluntary lead service line replacement program. March’s webinar included speakers from Washington State, Department of Health and D.C. Water.

EPA HQ and all 10 EPA regions met regularly to discuss LCR challenges and strengthen implementation nationwide. This effort includes quarterly reviews of lead exceedance data and system violations reported to the Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS).   

Continued a series of webinars on lead service line replacement. June’s webinar included speakers from Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection to discuss each state’s program for lead service line identification and replacement, including how replacements are regulated and funded.

Throughout May and June, hosted the National Lead and Copper Rule 101 Training Series for States and Water Utilities.

Hosted a training specifically discussing the LCR lead public education & other public information requirements. This training was provided to states and water utilities with tools to help better inform their consumers about lead in drinking water.

Released an updated version of the Optimal Corrosion Control Treatment Manual which incorporated feedback from states and technical updates to the previous version.

EPA HQ and EPA’s 10 Regional Offices met monthly to discuss LCR challenges and opportunities to strengthen implementation nationwide. This effort included quarterly reviews of lead exceedance data and system violations reported to the SDWIS. 

Hosted webinars on lead service line replacement. This series showcased best practices for states and utilities on how to implement a voluntary lead service line replacement program.

September's webinar focused on large utility programs. The webinar featured a presentation from EPA Office of Research Development that sought participants for a new research project focused on lead service lines as well as presentations from Central Arkansas Water and Louisville Water that described their lead service line replacement programs.

In July 2019, EPA and the U.S. Department of Education hosted a webinar on Reducing Lead in Drinking Water. The Office of Safe and Supportive Schools (OSSS) within the U.S. Department of Education (ED), and its Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools Technical Assistance (REMS TA) Center highlighted the impacts of lead exposure on the learning environment and steps other agencies can take to integrate lead testing and reduction programs into school emergency management planning and emergency operations plans. EPA discussed the tools available to support states and localities with lead testing and reduction.

EPA's Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) Data Management Advisory Committee sponsored a Best Practices Webinar on the LCR for the SDWIS community in September 2019. The 2-hour webinar which covered data entry and best practices for LCR management was attended by over 100 participants from state drinking water programs. 

EPA partnered with HUD to aid with the potential cost associated with lead service line replacement to support states and cities to fully utilize the suite of funding and financing options provided by the federal government. These options included the EPA's Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund, the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act grant programs and the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act financing programs as well as HUD's Community Development Block Grants. Additionally, EPA assisted entities as they considered using these funding mechanisms, the EPA and HUD developed a comprehensive website that provided information on how to use, apply for and meet the requirements of each program.

EPA HQ and the regions continued to meet regularly to discuss LCR challenges and strengthen implementation nationwide.

Continued to update the Leaders in Reducing Lead story map by adding best practices that showcase how communities nationwide are removing lead service lines voluntarily. The Leaders in Reducing Lead storymap is an interactive way to learn about programs across the country that are removing lead service lines and reducing lead in drinking water in schools and child care facilities. Users will find detailed case studies and will learn how the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund and EPA's revision of the Lead and Copper Rule support the efforts of communities in replacing their lead service lines.

Users will find resources to test for and reduce lead in drinking water in schools and child care facilities, including the recently announced Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) grant and the new 3Ts Toolkit.

View LCR tools and resources here.

EPA’s Leaders in Reducing Lead in Drinking Water website.

Assist schools and child care centers with the 3Ts approach (Training, Testing and Taking Action) to reduce lead in drinking water and increase the number of schools and child care centers that test and provide parents with information on how to minimize children’s exposure to lead in drinking water.

Released a revised 3Ts toolkit to assist those implementing lead monitoring in schools and child care facilities in October 2018. The revised version is available in an interactive web-format and includes modules and customizable templates. EPA recognizes that communicating early and often about testing plans, results and next steps will build confidence in a school’s ability to provide a safe environment. To improve communication with community members and parents, EPA has added an additional communication tool in 27 languages and translations for English Instructions.

Worked with states, utilities and local organizations to showcase efforts across the country and added additional case studies to the Leaders in Reducing Lead in Drinking Water map.

Conducted 3Ts webinars in May and June 2019 and provided technical assistance to regions, states, utilities and the school community to encourage lead testing in schools and provide information regarding remediation actions.

Continued to work with states, utilities and local organizations to showcase efforts to reduce lead in drinking water within schools and child care centers across the country.
Continued to add case studies to the Leaders in Reducing Lead in Drinking Water map.

Updated an existing Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), Reducing Lead Levels in Drinking Water in Schools and Child Care Facilities. The updated MOU will include current and new partners aimed to provide a more meaningful coordinated approach to help schools and child care programs. This was done in conjunction with the recently revised 3Ts toolkit and the newly announced Lead Testing in Schools and Child Care Programs Drinking Water grant authorized by the WIIN Act.

Updated a resource guide to help schools and child care facilities implement programs and policies to reduce children's exposure to lead in drinking water. This document included approximately 200 funding sources from federal programs, state programs and foundations/companies.

View tools and resources to reduce lead in drinking water in schools and child care facilities here.

Finalize regulatory changes to the definition of lead-free plumbing products and make other conforming changes to implement the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act and the Community Fire Safety Act enacted by Congress. The final regulation is expected to result in fewer sources of lead in drinking water by implementing new standards for lead content in plumbing materials used in new installations and repairs.

Considered comments on the proposed rule to inform final and conduct additional analysis to support preparation of a final rule.

Considered comments received from stakeholders on the proposed rule to inform the final rule and conducted additional analysis to support the preparation of the final rule.

Prepared final regulation and supporting technical documentation for the final rule to be published in winter 2020.

Click here for more information.

Collaborate with states and tribes to provide opportunities for low-interest loans and grants through the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) and the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) loan program for updating and replacing drinking water infrastructure.

Developed a new factsheet on Addressing Lead in Drinking Water with the DWSRF and case studies. Eligibilities between the DWSRF and the WIFIA overlap.

Published a new factsheet on Addressing Lead in Drinking Water with the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund and case studies in April 2019.

Continued to work with selected borrowers invited to apply for WIFIA financing in FY18. Twelve (12) of the selected projects address the reduction of lead or other drinking water contaminants. EPA closed four (4) loans in FY18, two (2) of which address the reduction of lead or other drinking water contaminants.

In response to the EPA’s third Notice of Funding Availability (FY19 round), the Agency received 51 letters of interest (LOI), collectively requesting $6.6 billion in WIFIA funding. This exceeds the $6 billion that EPA is offering, demonstrating the critical need for investment in our nation’s water infrastructure and strong interest in the WIFIA program. Thirteen (13) of the LOIs received proposed reducing exposure to lead in the nation's drinking water systems or ensures continuous compliance with contaminant limits.

Selected borrowers invited to apply for WIFIA financing in FY19 will be notified in October 2019.

Learn more about the DWSRF.

Learn more about WIFIA FY18 Selected Projects.

Learn more about WIFIA FY19 Letters of Interest.

Implement three newly authorized grant programs under the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act, for which Congress appropriated $50 million in FY 2018, to fund grants to small and disadvantaged communities for developing and maintaining infrastructure, for lead reduction projects and to support the voluntary testing of drinking water in schools and child care centers.

These programs decrease exposure to lead in drinking water by providing financial incentives to test, educate and replace infrastructure.

 

Sent out letters to state governors announcing the Lead Testing in Schools and Child Care Programs Drinking Water Grant authorized by the WIIN Act. At the beginning of 2019, EPA received letters from all 50 States and the District of Columbia confirming their commitment to reducing lead in drinking water in schools and to participate in this new grant.

Expect to notify states and the District of Columbia funding allotments for the Lead Testing in School and Child Care Programs Drinking Water Grant in March 2019.

Hosted webinars for states on the new grant guidance. 

Conducted the tribal consultation for the Lead in Drinking Water Grant authorized by the WIIN Act through March 2019.

Notified all 50 states and the District of Columbia of their funding allotments for the Lead Testing in School and Child Care Programs Drinking Water Grant in April 2019. 

Hosted webinars in May and June 2019 for states on the new grant guidance.

Completed the tribal consultation for the Lead in Drinking Water Grant authorized by the WIIN Act through March 2019.

Released the State Lead Testing in School and Child Care Program Drinking Water Testing Grant Implementation Document. This document describes the programmatic requirements applicable to states and territories awarded through this Program. It also provides information to EPA regions and to participating states and territories on how the Agency intends to award and manage state Lead Testing in School and Child Care Program Drinking Water Grant Program funds.

Published a sample workplan to assist states with developing and finalizing their work plans. It includes agency priority goals, measurable outcomes, plan development elements, key roles, partners and other important topics outlined in EPA’s 3Ts for Reducing Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Child Care Facilities.

Continued to develop and release relevant grant implementation materials.

Reviewed state workplans for the Lead Testing in Schools and Child Care Programs Drinking Water Grant authorized by the WIIN Act and begin awarding grants to states. All states and the District of Columbia submitted applications for grant funding.

EPA awarded the first grants to states under the WIIN Lead Testing in School and Child Care Program Drinking Water Grant Program. 

EPA opened applications on Grants.gov for the WIIN Small and Disadvantaged Grant. Funding is expected to be awarded this fall and throughout FY20 as state applications come in.

View more information on the WIIN Grants.

ObJECTIVE 1.3. Reduce Exposure to Lead in Soil

Manage lead contamination at Superfund, RCRA Corrective Action and other sites to reduce exposure to community residents.

Continue to reduce childhood exposures to lead in soils through removal, remedial and corrective actions at contaminated sites and reduce lead soil exposures to the most sensitive community residents.

Continue to support the evaluation of lead exposure at contaminated sites and identify ways to protect the public’s health.

Reduced exposure to community members by continual efforts to manage 1,212 Superfund sites with lead as a contaminant of concern.

Completed eight (8) consultations at Superfund lead sites thus far in FY19.

Conducted removal actions at 49 sites with lead as a contaminant of concern.

Controlled human exposure at one (1) additional Superfund site.

Addressed sites where lead is reported to be a contaminant of concern at Superfund Remedial sites (includes both National Priorities List (NPL) sites and Superfund Alternative Approach sites), the Superfund Remedial Program completed residential yard clean up for a site in Missouri and continued work on 145 sites. The Superfund Removal Program completed 10 removal actions (including emergency, time critical and non-time critical actions) and continued work on 43 removal actions for sites where lead is a contaminant of concern. It should be noted that a site may have multiple cleanup actions.

Addressed sites where lead is reported to be a contaminant of concern at Superfund Remedial sites (includes both NPL sites and Superfund Alternative Approach sites), the Superfund Remedial Program completed 10 remedial actions and is continuing work on 176 sites.

The Superfund Removal Program completed seven (7) removal actions (including emergency, time critical and non-time critical actions) and continued work on 42 removal actions for sites where lead is a contaminant of concern. It should be noted that a site may have multiple cleanup actions. During this quarter, cleanup actions were also completed at four (4) Federal Facilities where lead is a contaminant of concern.

This work is important as the cleanup of lead-contaminated sites has been shown to reduce blood lead levels (BLL) in children living on or near these sites.

Research is being conducted to improve the agency’s understanding of the degree to which Superfund cleanups may lower BLLs at a wider range of lead contaminated sites. EPA’s National Center for Environmental Economics and Office of Land and Emergency Management have compiled a dataset that links two (2) decades of BLL measurements from children in six (6) states with EPA data on the location and characteristics of Superfund sites, as well as other determinants of lead exposure. The investigation uses advanced statistical methods to identify the relationship between proximity to Superfund cleanups and rates of elevated BLLs.

The research indicates that Superfund cleanup lowered the risk of elevated BLLs by roughly 8 to 18% for children living within 2 kilometers (1.24 miles) of a Superfund NPL site where lead is a contaminant of concern. Learn more about and read the publication here.

Objective 1.4. Reduce Exposure to Lead Associated with Emissions to Ambient Air

Continue to work with state and tribal air agencies to implement the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for lead and aim to reduce the number of areas violating the lead NAAQS.

Generated preliminary Design Values (2016-2018) for all 2008 NAAQS nonattainment areas and other violating areas.

Conducted regional reviews of preliminary Design Values (2016-2018) for all 22 2008 NAAQS nonattainment areas and other violating areas.

Finalized Design Values (2016-2018) for all 22 2008 NAAQS nonattainment areas and other violating areas.

Eleven (11) of the 22 initial areas designated nonattainment for the 2008 Pb NAAQS are attaining. For the majority of the remaining nonattainment areas, lead emissions and monitored concentrations are declining due to implemented control measures and all nonattainment areas have fulfilled air quality implementation plan requirements.

For more information click here.

Evaluate the impacts of lead emissions from aircraft using leaded aviation fuel under the Clean Air Act.

Completing two (2) technical reports: Model-extrapolated Estimates of Airborne Lead Concentrations at U.S. Airports and National Analysis of Populations Residing Near or Attending School Near U.S. Airports.

Finalizing two (2) technical reports: Model-extrapolated Estimates of Airborne Lead Concentrations at U.S. Airports and National Analysis of Populations Residing Near or Attending School Near U.S. Airports.

Finalizing two (2) technical reports: Model-extrapolated Estimates of Airborne Lead Concentrations at U.S. Airports and National Analysis of Populations Residing Near or Attending School Near U.S. Airports.

For more information click here.

GOAL 2: IDENTIFY LEAD-EXPOSED CHILDREN AND IMPROVE THEIR HEALTH OUTCOMES

EPA’s federal partners lead the actions under Goal 2 which are focused on improving the identification of children exposed to lead through surveillance of blood lead level data and improving access to services and support designed to improve children’s physical, developmental and mental health. Please visit https://ptfceh.niehs.nih.gov/ for future updates on Goal 2 of the Federal Action Plan.

GOAL 3: COMMUNICATE MORE EFFECTIVELY WITH STAKEHOLDERS

Objective 3.1. consolidate and streamline federal lead-related communication and messaging

Create an online portal to enhance, consolidate and streamline federal-wide communication to the public. Links will direct the public to agency-specific information. (Not everyone affected by lead exposures has access to the internet and therefore, agencies will continue to provide access to printed materials)

Refreshed EPA links to lead resources and made sure that relevant links that were not currently located on EPA’s website.

Continued to refresh links, connect links and add new content (e.g., information on the final dust-lead hazard standards,  information on WIIN Grant: Lead Testing School and Child Care Program, etc.), as EPA makes progress on its actions to increase transparency.

Continued to refresh links, connect links and add new content as EPA makes progress on its actions to increase transparency.

Worked to develop and update content as it relates to reducing leading lead exposures for materials for Children’s Health Month and Lead Poisoning Prevention Week.

To view EPA’s lead website, click here.

Provide periodic updates on the progress of implementing the Action Plan on the online portal.

Created Implementation Status for EPA Actions Under the 2018 Federal Action Plan: To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts web page.

Updated the Implementation Status for EPA Actions Under the 2018 Federal Action Plan: To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts web page with the Q3 Status Report.

Updated the Implementation Status for EPA Actions Under the 2018 Federal Action Plan: To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts web page with the Q3 Status Report.

To view the Implementation Status for EPA Actions Under the 2018 Federal Action Plan: To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts web page, click here

Objective 3.2. improVe awareness of lead hazards, prevention and remediation among diverse populations, especially those most at risk

Utilize Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs) to develop appropriate, evidence-based lead exposure prevention and intervention communication materials and disseminate them through the PEHSUs established community networks.

Provided $1,128,425 for FY19 to support the PEHSU network. Continued to play a partnership role in the PEHSU program, making recommendations to ATSDR on program design, management and direction and by annually providing 35 to 40% of the funding support.

In addition, the children’s environmental health coordinators in EPA regional offices worked regularly with their PEHSU counterparts to plan and implement children’s environmental health outreach and education efforts in communities across the region. 

In New Orleans, EPA’s Region 6 PEHSU held a Children’s Environmental Health Symposium with extensive training on lead poisoning in children. 80 public health practitioners from across the Gulf Coast attended.

PEHSUs trained pediatric health professionals in lead testing, how to increase testing rates and how to improve treatment and follow up care for children exposed to lead. Working with the American Academy of Pediatrics, PEHSU trained 65 professionals in CA, MD, NH, NY, UT and WA with the ability to reach over 10,000 patients.

In collaboration with the Pediatric Associates clinic at Mount Sinai, the Region 2 PEHSU implemented a screening program to identify harmful environmental exposures such as lead, mold, pests, tobacco smoke, as well as questions about food insecurity, healthcare access, housing and education/development. The PEHSU screened 4,821 families and referred 1,092 to environmental health resources this year.

The Region 10 PEHSU educated over 550 WA and OR clinicians, including those working with refugees, on the importance of pediatric lead screening.

The Region 9 PEHSU noticed an increase in lead poisoning among immigrant children from use of lead-containing imported makeup. In response, the Western States PEHSU developed a set of fact sheets on the risks of using these products on children. The fact sheets are available in Dari, Pashto, Urdu, Hindi, Arabic and Somali, each with an English translation. At the request of state public health officials, the PEHSU stepped in to provide clear and concise advice and translated their fact sheet into seven (7) languages to provide direct reach to the communities.

The Region 8 PEHSU developed and disseminated materials for available to region-wide partners such as departments of environmental health and/or public health and clinicians, such as brochures and posters about protecting children from exposure to lead. The PEHSU exhibited at UT and CO annual public health meetings to educate attendees about lead in children. The PEHSU attended the National Association of School Nurses annual meeting and displayed many of the newly developed lead-specific materials for an audience of 1,500 attendees.

The PEHSU network created outreach materials to alert public health officials about lead and inform them of services and resources available from PEHSUs, building on past presentations to the American Public Health Association.

The Region 3 PEHSU developed videos and fact sheets on lead in soil in English and Spanish to inform families of potential risks and how to minimize exposures to children from lead in soil. Materials are shared with families near current and former Superfund sites where lead is a contaminant of concern and throughout the region for lead outreach efforts. The PEHSU trained community health workers, health educators and others on how to conduct an environmental assessment in the home to help families reduce exposures to children. Two (2) in-person trainings were provided in English and Spanish in communities with high incidence of childhood lead and asthma. Webinars planned in English and Spanish will allow for other communities to be reached throughout the region.

The Region 3 PEHSU presented at the Mid-Atlantic Lead Forum in Hunt Valley, MD. This forum was sponsored by EPA’s Region 3 and included opening remarks by EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler and a presentation by EPA’s Office of Children’s Health Protection. 

PEHSUs are a 20-year-old network of experts uniquely qualified to train health care providers on the prevention, diagnosis, management and treatment of lead exposure in children. There are 11 units around the country, several of which were originally lead clinics. EPA provides support to the PEHSU program that ATSDR designs, funds and manages. To learn more, click here.

Enhance partnerships with state, tribal and local governments and key stakeholders (e.g., media, community groups, faith-based groups, advocacy groups, departments of health, departments of environmental quality, medical providers, philanthropies, federal grantees and others) that represent or serve communities at risk for childhood lead exposure.

Completed draft lesson plans for tribal lead curriculum – Lead Awareness in Indian Country: Keeping our Children Healthy!

Conducted working session on the tribal lead curriculum at the March 2019 National Tribal Toxics Council Meeting.

Completed plans to conduct a pilot training of the tribal lead curriculumLead Awareness in Indian Country: Keeping our Children Healthy! at Oneida Nation.

Explored additional pilot training opportunities with tribal partners.

Collaborated with over 200 tribal representatives to evaluate the feasibility, understanding, and design of a new tribal lead curriculum (i.e., Lead Awareness in Indian Country: Keeping our Children Healthy!)to best serve tribes.

Seven (7) pilot training events of the new tribal lead curriculum were conducted in partnership with the Oneida Nation, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, the Eight Northern Indian Pueblo Council, the National Tribal Toxics Council, and the National-EPA Tribal Science Council. These events gathered feedback to make modifications and identified how the curriculum can be best delivered.

The curriculum intends to raise awareness about childhood lead exposures, potential impacts on children’s health and cultural practices, and encourage actions that can be taken to reduce and/or prevent lead exposures.

The curriculum is formatted to allow tribal communities to adapt information to meet individual needs and internal discussions. The curriculum consists of four (4) modules:

Module 1: Understanding Lead – provides an overview of lead, its impacts and actions that can be taken to reduce potential lead exposures and lead poisoning; Module 2: Effective Cleaning Techniques – explains and demonstrates recommended cleaning techniques for reducing household lead dust; Module 3: Personal Hygiene and Nutrition – focuses on the connection between personal hygiene and nutrition for children and potential exposures to lead; and Module 4: Hiring Certified Lead Professionals – emphasizes the importance of hiring a certified lead professional to follow lead-safe work practices to reduce exposures to lead.

GOAL 4: SUPPORT AND CONDUCT CRITICAL RESEARCH TO INFORM EFFORTS TO REDUCE LEAD EXPOSURES AND RELATED HEALTH RISKS

Key Priorities: Prioritize and Address the critical research and data needs to inform lead policies and guide decisions

Enhance and apply data and tools (e.g., models or approaches) and determine the key drivers of blood lead levels (BLLs) from multimedia exposures to inform lead regulatory decisions and site assessments.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross agency research workshop with NIEHS, CDC and HUD.

Applied lead multimedia exposure and biokinetic models in support of the forthcoming final dust- lead hazard standards.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross-agency research workshop with NIEHS, CDC and HUD.

Completed lead multimedia exposure and biokinetic models in support of the final dust-lead hazard standards.

Identified external panel members to conduct peer review of the All-Ages Lead Model (AALM) by the Science Advisory Board (SAB).

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD, currently planned for Dec 2019 in Bethesda, MD (for all parts of Goal 4).

Application of lead multimedia exposure and biokinetic models, expertise in water sampling and premise plumbing, and expertise in health impacts estimation in support of the LCR revisions.

External peer review of the All-Ages Lead Model (AALM) by the SAB to potentially expand Agency’s capacity to incorporate intermittent and adult lead exposures to regulatory and risk assessment decisions. 

 

Generate data, maps and mapping tools to identify high exposure communities or locations and disparities for prioritization efforts to reduce children’s blood lead levels.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross agency research workshop with NIEHS, CDC and HUD.

Provided technical assistance to EPA Region 5 partners in support of their efforts to identify high exposure locations.

Held EPA internal workshop on lead mapping coordination efforts.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross-agency research workshop with NIEHS, CDC and HUD.

Provided technical assistance to EPA Regions 5 and 7 in support of their efforts to identify high exposure locations and presented draft results in interagency meetings with state and federal partners.

Continued receipt and analysis of incoming drinking water samples from the HUD sponsored American Healthy Homes Survey II.

Researched bioaccessibility that links soil chemistry, lead levels and microbiology at contaminated sites. 

Participated with CDC and HUD in EPA-led session at the National Environmental Health Association Conference on lead mapping efforts to identify high exposure locations.

 

Generate data to address critical gaps for reducing uncertainty in lead modeling and mapping for exposure/risk analyses and for estimating population-wide health benefits of actions to reduce lead exposures.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross agency research workshop with NIEHS, CDC and HUD.

Conducted initial analysis of incoming multimedia samples from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) sponsored American Healthy Homes Survey II.

Sponsored public webinars on small drinking water systems, “Actual vs. Predicted: Lead Scale Observations from the Field” and “Destabilization of Lead Pipe Scales in a Long-Term Vacant Home in Cincinnati.”

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD.

Continued analysis of incoming multimedia samples from HUD sponsored American Healthy Homes Survey II.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD.

Continued analysis of incoming multimedia samples from the HUD sponsored American Healthy Homes Survey II.

For more information on the HUD sponsored American Healthy Homes Survey II, click here.

Identify approaches to prevent, mitigate and communicate about lead exposures and risks in exposed communities.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross agency research workshop with NIEHS, CDC and HUD.

Created a tool for identifying point of use filters certified to reduce lead.

Provided ongoing technical support to assess effectiveness of corrosion control treatment in multiple cities, applying innovative lead mitigation methods for addressing lead in drinking water.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD.

Conducted EPA’s Office of Research and Development and Region 6 2019 Small Drinking Water Systems Workshop held at EPA Region 6, May 21-22, 2019, with 129 participants.

Provided ongoing technical support to assess effectiveness of corrosion control treatment in multiple cities applying innovative lead mitigation methods for addressing lead in drinking water.

Provided ongoing technical support to assess effectiveness of corrosion control treatment in multiple cities applying innovative lead mitigation methods for addressing lead in drinking water, including field and lab technical support for Agency and NJ state and municipal efforts in Newark NJ.

Conducted EPA’s Office of Research and Development 16th Annual Drinking Water Workshop: Small Systems Challenges and Solutions, held in Cincinnati, September 24-25, 2019, with more than 500 participants. Included session on lead corrosion, a keynote on lead and breakout sessions on corrosion and lead in schools.

EPA Office of Research and Development and Region 6, in partnership with Region 6 states and the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators, held the May 21-22 workshop to provide information and training relevant to small drinking water systems. This meeting was an extension of EPA’s Annual Drinking Water Workshop, and the first designed to bring together EPA and regional experts to focus on small systems challenges that states in the region are facing. The objectives were: 1) Understand compliance issues faced by small drinking water systems in Region 6 states; 2) Address these technical challenges through ideas and information exchange; and 3) Provide a forum for networking. Region 6 has been receiving positive feedback from their respective States on the meeting content and the information that was brought back with the attendees.  

Evaluate the effectiveness of actions (e.g., interventions, programs, policies, enforcement) to prevent lead exposure, mitigate health effects and communicate on lead exposures/risks.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD.

Continued to co-lead the development of a cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD.

 

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