An official website of the United States government.

We've made some changes to EPA.gov. If the information you are looking for is not here, you may be able to find it on the EPA Web Archive or the January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot.

Implementation Status of the Lead Action Plan

Status of EPA Actions, FY 2020

Action

Status

FY20 Q1 – Accomplishments

FY20 Q2 – Accomplishments

FY20 Q3 – Next Steps

More Information

GOAL 1: REDUCE CHILDREN’S EXPOSURE TO LEAD SOURCES

Objective 1.1. Reduce Children’s Exposure in Homes and Child-Occupied Facilities with Lead-Based Paint Hazards

The Dust-Lead Hazard Standards (DLHS)  final rule was completed and signed on 6/21/19. See EPA’s press release.

Consider changes to the post-abatement clearance levels consistent with the final revisions to the dust-lead hazard standards.

On track

EPA considered changes to the post-abatement clearance levels.

EPA considered changes to the post-abatement clearance levels.

Continue considering changes to the post-abatement clearance levels and expect to issue a proposed rule this spring.

As a part of EPA’s efforts to reduce childhood lead exposure, EPA finalized a revision to the DLHS for floors and window sills. These standards apply to most pre-1978 housing and child-occupied facilities, such as daycare centers and schools. The final rule revised the DLHS from 40 µg/ft2 and 250 µg/ft2 to 10 µg/ft2 and 100 µg/ft2 on floors and window sills, respectively.

During the DLHS rulemaking process, EPA indicated it would review the dust-lead clearance levels at a later date. EPA is now considering changes to the post-abatement clearance levels consistent with the final revisions to the DLHS. To update the dust-lead clearance levels, EPA must take several steps such as conducting health, exposure and economic analyses.

Continue to implement regulations and other relevant authorities that require individuals and firms conducting lead-based paint abatement, risk assessment or inspection to be properly trained and certified, training programs to be accredited and these activities to be conducted according to reliable, effective and safe work practice standards.

On track

EPA conducted 123 compliance assistance and 150 outreach activities that supported abatement, risk assessment and inspection components of the Lead-Based Paint Program.

EPA conducted 233 compliance assistance and 133 outreach activities that supported abatement, risk assessment and inspection components of the Lead-Based Paint Program.

Report the number of compliance assistance and outreach activities that support abatement, risk assessment and inspection components of EPA’s Lead-Based Paint Program conducted during FY20 Q3.

EPA provides annual funding to authorized states and tribal programs that administer training and certification programs for lead professionals and renovation contractors. Examples of activities include: outreach, education, oversight and processing accreditation applications. For more information, click here.

Increase the number (or percentage) of certified renovation firms capable of providing lead-safe renovation, repair and painting services through targeted outreach campaigns to contractors; continue to provide a nationwide list of certified renovation firms on EPA’s website.

On track

EPA updated the list of certified renovation firms. A total of 1,504 new RRP firms were certified and 8,045 contractors received RRP training.

The EPA conducted 313 compliance assistance activities to increase the number of RRP certified firms.

EPA updated the list of certified renovation firms. A total of 1,644 new RRP firms were certified and 8,784 contractors received RRP training.

The EPA conducted 335 compliance assistance activities to increase the number of RRP certified firms.

Reminder postcards and emails were sent to firms with expiring certifications.

Publish the updated list of certified renovation firms on EPA’s website.

Report the total number of RRP firms certified and contractors trained during FY20 Q3. 

EPA provides annual funding to authorized states and tribal programs that administer training and certification programs for lead professionals and renovation contractors.

Objective 1.2. Reduce Exposure to Lead from Drinking Water

Revise the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) based on input EPA recently received from state, tribal and local partners, as well as the best available peer reviewed science, to ensure the rule reflects the best ways to improve public health protection and reduce levels of lead in drinking water.

On track

Published the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWR) for LCR revisions (LCRR) for public comment.

Provided briefing on the proposed LCRR to EPA’s Science Advisory Board (SAB) on March 30, 2020.

Evaluate public comments received on the LCRR proposal. SAB review of the LCRR.

The EPA proposed LCRR is available here.

Enhance implementation of the LCR by engaging with state, tribal, local and other stakeholders to identify implementation challenges, best practices and tools to address these challenges.

On track

Continued to host webinars on lead service line replacement. This series showcases best practices for states and utilities implementing a voluntary lead service line replacement program. December’s webinar focused on small water utility challenges. All webinars are recorded and posted as a reference of case studies and best practices on EPA’s website.

Identified specific areas of the LCR that continue to pose implementation challenges to state, tribal and other stakeholders, such as identification of lead service lines. These areas will be incorporated into a new webinar series that provides targeted training to states and water systems and highlights additional tools they can leverage towards meeting those challenges to enhance national implementation.

Continue supporting efforts to enhance implementation by providing webinars through Q4.

View LCR tools and resources here.

EPA’s Leaders in Reducing Lead in Drinking Water website.

Assist schools and child care centers with the 3Ts approach (Training, Testing and Taking Action) to reduce lead in drinking water and increase the number of schools and child care centers that test and provide parents with information on how to minimize children’s exposure to lead in drinking water.

On track

EPA’s 3Ts Guidance is a comprehensive resource for schools and child care facilities implementing a lead testing in drinking water program.

Began creating a Spanish version of the 3Ts manual and communication templates for parents.

Continued development of a Spanish version of the 3Ts manual and communication templates for parents.

Began developing the 3T’s data e-tracker as a 3Ts Toolkit resources for schools and childcare facilities.

Began development of the plan E-Builder to automate development of 3Ts plan to test, train and take action.

Developed a template letter for schools to communicate sample results to parents, faculty and larger school communities.  

Finalize and release Spanish translations of the 3Ts manual and communication templates.

Continue working with MOU stakeholders to integrate the 3Ts Guidance in state lead testing programs and expand the federal family resources to support remediation and/or replacement.

Finalize template correspondence (part of module 1 of the 3Ts Guidance) that states can use with communities to communicate pending testing programs that are newly implemented or expanded via grant funding.

Finalize and release template letter communicating sample results.

Begin development of sampling field guide and video targeted for schools and childcare facilities on “How to Take a Sample.”

Begin planning training series focusing on childcare facilities.

View tools and resources to reduce lead in drinking water in schools and child care facilities here.

Finalize regulatory changes to the definition of lead-free plumbing products and make other conforming changes to implement the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act and the Community Fire Safety Act enacted by Congress. The final regulation is expected to result in fewer sources of lead in drinking water by implementing new standards for lead content in plumbing materials used in new installations and repairs.

On track

Submitted the draft of the final regulation to OMB for review.

Continue to engage with OMB on their review.

Address OMB comments to clear the Rule for promulgation.

Click here for more information.

Collaborate with states and tribes to provide opportunities for low-interest loans and grants through the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund and the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) loan program for updating and replacing drinking water infrastructure.

On track

Invited 38 new projects to apply for WIFIA loan in the FY19 funding round, 11 of which address lead or emerging contaminants.

Closed two (2) loans:

  • Indiana Finance Authority: $436 million – Closed on 10/17/2019
  • City of Oak Ridge: $20.7 million – Closed on 10/17/2019

Signed a MOU with the Bureau of Reclamation on October 24, 2019, to seek opportunities to leverage funding provided by WIFIA with existing Reclamation funding programs.

Continued to work with borrowers invited to apply for WIFIA financing with the goal of closing additional loans for the projects aimed at addressing lead or emerging contaminants.

Continue to work with borrowers invited to apply for WIFIA financing with the goal of finalizing applications and close loans.

Learn more about the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund.

Learn more about WIFIA FY18 Selected Projects.

Learn more about WIFIA FY19 Letters of Interest.

Learn more about WIFIA FY19 Selected Projects.

Learn more about WIFIA Closed Loans.

Implement three newly authorized grant programs under the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act, for which Congress appropriated $50 million in FY 2018, to fund grants to small and disadvantaged communities for developing and maintaining infrastructure, for lead reduction projects and to support the voluntary testing of drinking water in schools and child care centers.

These programs decrease exposure to lead in drinking water by providing financial incentives to test, educate and replace infrastructure.

On track

Began awarding grants to states for the Lead Testing in School Drinking Water Grant and the Assistance for Small and Disadvantaged Communities Grant. For a list of grantees click here.

Began awarding grants to states for the Lead Testing in School Drinking Water Grant and the Assistance for Small and Disadvantaged Communities Grant. For a list of grantees click here.

As of Q2FY20, there are 45 states with awards and 18 with programs underway.

Regions/states are requesting extension of grant reporting period due to the impact of Covid-19 to states, schools and administrators.

Released and announced the opening of the Request for Applications via Grants.gov for the final WIIN grant, Reductions in Lead Exposure, for $39.9M. More information can be found here.

Announced the FY2020 state funding allotments to continue the Lead Testing in Schools Drinking Water Grant. For more information click here.

Announced FY2020 funding availability for new participants (e.g., Puerto Rico and U.S. territories) to partake in the Lead in Testing in Schools Drinking Water Grant Program.

Began the development of options for the SDWA 1459A, the Increasing Resiliency to Natural Hazards Grant Program.

Complete the awards for all participating states and the District of Columbia with funding for the initial launch of the Lead Testing in School Drinking Water Grant.

Close the RFA for $39.9 million in WIIN Reduction in Lead Exposure Grant in June/July2020 and begin the review of qualified applications.

Continue providing webinars/outreach to states on topics or questions related to the Lead Testing in Schools and Childcare Facilities Drinking Water and Small & Disadvantaged Communities Drinking Water Grant Programs.

Receive initial grant reporting on the lead testing programs in schools.

Continue review and approval of project applications for the grant awards for the Assistance to Small & Disadvantaged Communities Grant.

Draft and develop the SDWA 1459A Increasing Resiliency to Natural Hazards Grant Program.

Finalize implementation guide for Tribal Lead Testing in Schools and Childcare Drinking Water Grant Program.

View more information on the WIIN Grants.

ObJECTIVE 1.3. Reduce Exposure to Lead in Soil

Manage lead contamination at Superfund, RCRA Corrective Action and other sites to reduce exposure to community residents.

Continue to reduce childhood exposures to lead in soils through removal, remedial and corrective actions at contaminated sites and reduce lead soil exposures to the most sensitive community residents.

Continue to support the evaluation of lead exposure at contaminated sites and identify ways to protect the public’s health.

On track

EPA completed one (1) cleanup action at Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey. The completed action was removal of 261 cubic yards of soil where lead was a contaminant of concern. The maximum detected level of lead in this area prior to cleanup was 2,400 mg/kg or parts per million. 

During this quarter, EPA also completed seven (7) removal actions to address lead in soils. These actions occurred in five (5) states: Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Mississippi and Missouri. The cleanup actions occurred at a variety of types of sites, including former mining, mineral processing facilities and other industrial facilities.

EPA completed six (6) cleanup actions as sites where lead is a contaminant of concern.  Four (4) of these actions were at remedial sites and two (2) of them were under the Superfund removal program. 

Continue to manage lead contamination at Superfund, RCRA Corrective Action and other sites to reduce exposure to community residents. Efforts expected to include:

Continue to reduce childhood exposures to lead in soils through removal, remedial and corrective actions at contaminated sites and reduce lead soil exposures to the most sensitive community residents.

Continue to support the evaluation of lead exposure at contaminated sites and identify ways to protect the public’s health. Actions will include distributing outreach materials to regions gathered through the Interagency Task Force.

This work is important as the cleanup of lead-contaminated sites has been shown to reduce blood lead levels (BLL) in children living on or near these sites.

Research is being conducted to improve the agency’s understanding of the degree to which Superfund cleanups may lower blood lead levels at a wider range of lead contaminated sites. EPA’s National Center for Environmental Economics and Office of Land and Emergency Management have compiled a dataset that links two (2) decades of BLL measurements from children in six (6) states with EPA data on the location and characteristics of Superfund sites, as well as other determinants of lead exposure. The investigation uses advanced statistical methods to identify the relationship between proximity to Superfund cleanups and rates of elevated BLLs.

Results of the research indicate that Superfund cleanup lowered the risk of elevated BLLs by roughly 13 to 26% for children living within 2 kilometers (1.24 miles) of a Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) site where lead is a contaminant of concern. Learn more about and read the publication here.  [See also Douglas County research in Goal 4, below].

Objective 1.4. Reduce Exposure to Lead Associated with Emissions to Ambient Air

Continue to work with state and tribal air agencies to implement the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for lead and aim to reduce the number of areas violating the lead NAAQS.

On track

Continued to work with states to monitor lead emissions and work towards taking action on 2008 Lead NAAQS redesignation requests and maintenance plans.

Continued to work with states to monitor lead emissions and work towards taking action on 2008 Lead NAAQS redesignation requests and maintenance plans.

Continuing to work with states to monitor lead emissions and work towards taking action on 2008 Lead NAAQS redesignation requests and maintenance plans.

Eleven (11) of the 22 initial areas designated nonattainment for the 2008 Pb NAAQS are attaining. For the majority of the remaining nonattainment areas, lead emissions and monitored concentrations are declining due to implemented control measures and all nonattainment areas have fulfilled air quality implementation plan requirements.

For more information click here.

Evaluate the impacts of lead emissions from aircraft using leaded aviation fuel under the Clean Air Act.

Completed

Finalized two technical reports: Model-extrapolated Estimates of Airborne Lead Concentrations at U.S. Airports, and National Analysis of Populations Residing Near or Attending School Near U.S. Airports.

Posted the two completed technical reports on EPA's website.

 

For more information click here.

GOAL 2: IDENTIFY LEAD-EXPOSED CHILDREN AND IMPROVE THEIR HEALTH OUTCOMES

EPA’s federal partners lead the actions under Goal 2 which are focused on improving the identification of children exposed to lead through surveillance of blood lead level data and improving access to services and support designed to improve children’s physical, developmental and mental health. Please visit https://ptfceh.niehs.nih.gov/ for future updates on Goal 2 of the Federal Action Plan.

GOAL 3: COMMUNICATE MORE EFFECTIVELY WITH STAKEHOLDERS

Objective 3.1. consolidate and streamline federal lead-related communication and messaging

Create an online portal to enhance, consolidate and streamline federal-wide communication to the public. Links will direct the public to agency-specific information. (Not everyone affected by lead exposures has access to the internet and therefore, agencies will continue to provide access to printed materials).

On track

Continued to refresh links and connect links to web page as applicable.

Updated Children’s Health Month and Lead Poisoning Prevention Week content to the web. Released the October 2019, Progress Report on the Federal Action Plan to Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts. To view the report, click here.

Released the October 2019, Protecting Children’s Health report which included information on the agency’s efforts to reduce and prevent lead exposures. 

Released the America’s Children and the Environment, October 2019 report which included information on lead indicators.

Released the Supporting Houses of Worship: Effective Affordable Measures to Protect the Health of Congregations and Staff, October 2019 report. Report included background information on lead and steps that can be taken to reduce lead exposures.

Released the Protecting Children's Health October 2019 Tips poster which included information on how to reduce exposures to lead.

EPA’s Lead-based Paint Enforcement Helps Protect Children and Vulnerable Communities – 2019 resource was released in October 2019.

EPA Reduces Lead Exposures Through Cleanup Enforcement 2019was made available online December 2019.

Continued to refresh links and connect links as applicable.

Continue to refresh links and connect links to web page as applicable. To honor EPA’s commitments, we will continue to provide periodic updates on EPA’s progress.

www.epa.gov/lead

Provide periodic updates on the progress of implementing the Action Plan on the online portal.

On track

Updated the Implementation Status for EPA Actions Under the 2018 Federal Action Plan: To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts web page with the Q4 (FY 19) Status Report and made additional updates.

Updated the webpage with the Q1 (FY 20) Status Report for the Implementation Status for EPA Under the 2018 Federal Action Plan: To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts web page and made additional updates.

Will update the webpage with the Q2 (FY 20) Status Report for the Implementation Status for EPA Under the 2018 Federal Action Plan: To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts web page.

To view the Implementation Status for EPA Actions Under the 2018 Federal Action Plan: To Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Associated Health Impacts web page, click here

Objective 3.2. improVe awareness of lead hazards, prevention and remediation among diverse populations, especially those most at risk

Utilize Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs) to develop appropriate, evidence-based lead exposure prevention and intervention communication materials and disseminate them through the PEHSUs established community networks.

On track

The Northwest PEHSU (Region 10) presented at the Alaska Environmental Health Association conference and the All Alaska Pediatric Partnership symposium the week of October 8th in Anchorage, AK. The presentations covered childhood lead exposures.

PEHSUs exhibited and presented at the 2019 American Public Health Association Annual Meeting in November 2019, talking with more than 150 attendees and presenting 2 posters on Translating Science to Action: The Role of Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units in Public Health Messaging and Addressing an Old Problem with New Innovations: How a Network of Experts Reduces Pediatric Lead Exposure.

The Region 3 PEHSU trained 25 public health students and 40 nursing students, covering epidemiological perspectives on lead and health impacts of lead.

At the request of the State of Minnesota, the Region 5 PEHSU reviewed the Childhood Blood Lead Clinical Treatment Guidelines for Minnesota which are now available on their website. The 2019 Revision was finalized in October 2019 and was updated based on national recommendations, alignment with the case management guidelines and input from a multi-disciplinary workgroup. For additional information click here.

The Western States PEHSU (Region 9) sent an e-newsletter with information about lead to promotores and community health workers.

The Western States PEHSU also completed the latest chapter in A Story of Health on cognitive decline. This new chapter discusses how environmental exposures, including exposure to lead, over the life course can influence cognitive function and decline as we age. For more information, click here.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and PEHSU recruited pediatric primary care practices to participate in a lead testing tele-mentoring program called Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes, designed to create communities of learners by bringing together health care providers and experts using didactic and case‐based presentations. PEHSU faculty serve as subject matter experts. The program offers Maintenance of Certification credit. For more information click here.

In January 2020, Region 3 PEHSU staff lectured nursing students on a variety of children’s environmental health issues, including lead, at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA at their first Pediatric Environmental Health Symposium.

The Southeast (Region 4) PEHSU supported Atlanta-based Historic Westside Gardens and other community groups in understanding clinical guidance for testing children for lead exposure in the wake of recent developments around lead exposure in southwest Atlanta communities. PEHSU physicians and nurses provided clarity and guidance on how to test to those responding to community concerns around lead exposure. Beneficiaries included community members in Southwest Atlanta affected by potential lead exposure in soil. The outcome included providers gaining a clear understanding of how to appropriately test for lead.

Region 5 PEHSU staff created a video that introduced environmental exposures to first year medical students. The video covers radium, lead, mercury and other issues, and explains how the environment impacts human health, who are vulnerable populations, what are windows of susceptibility, the role of environmental justice and gives credible sources of information.

Region 9 PEHSU staff completed the latest chapter in A Story of Health, which focuses on cognitive decline. This new chapter discusses how environmental exposures, including exposure to lead, over the life course can influence cognitive function and decline as we age.

Region 9 PEHSU developed and designed a new fact sheet for the general public on why children have both higher exposures to toxins, including lead, and increased vulnerability to those exposures relative to adults. The fact sheet is available in both English and Spanish and be found on the Western States PEHSU website or here.

The Region 9 PEHSU also sponsored an interview program on a local Native language Afghani TV station about lead exposure caused by use of imported eye makeup ("surma" or kohl). The program aired on the Afghan Theater TV station in Pittsburg, CA on January 16. The show was live, with questions fielded from the public from as far away as Norway. Following the initial show, the station aired the recorded conversation several more times between January 16th and January 30th. Several people had questions after viewing the recorded show and on January 30th another live call-in session was held. The outcome included many questions that were answered and increased downloads of the “Lead in Imported Makeup” fact sheets that are in Dari and Pashto as well as Hindi, Arabic, Somali, Urdu.

On January 27, Region 10 PEHSU staff presented "No Level is Safe: Pediatric Lead Exposure" as the Pediatric Grand Rounds presentation at PeaceHealth Hospital in Eugene, WA for more than 30 attendees.

Many experts from the PEHSU network have been integral to the AAP Lead Testing Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes project launched in February 2020 to establish a community of learners consisting of 12 primary care practices. This project offers Maintenance of Certification to practicing pediatricians; PEHSU staff served as instructors.

Continue to support the work of PEHSUs to provide expert consultations to health care providers on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of lead exposure during pregnancy and childhood; address childhood lead exposure in grand rounds, medical and nursing educational settings and seminars; provide expertise to lay audiences through briefings, conferences and webinars; and, collaborate with research centers on research translation and messaging on a variety of children’s health issues, including lead.

PEHSUs are a 20-year-old network of experts uniquely qualified to train health care providers on the prevention, diagnosis, management and treatment of lead exposure in children. There are 11 units around the country, several of which were originally lead clinics. EPA provides support to the PEHSU program that ATSDR designs, funds and manages. To learn more click here.

Enhance partnerships with state, tribal and local governments and key stakeholders (e.g., media, community groups, faith-based groups, advocacy groups, departments of health, departments of environmental quality, medical providers, philanthropies, federal grantees and others) that represent or serve communities at risk for childhood lead exposure.

On track

Completed review of tribal input and made revisions to the curriculum, as appropriate.

Continued to revise the curriculum, developed a communications plan and created new supplemental materials.

Initiate review process of the curriculum.

The curriculum intends to raise awareness about childhood lead exposures; potential impacts on children’s health and cultural practices; and encourage actions that can be taken to reduce and/or prevent lead exposures.

The curriculum is formatted to allow tribal communities to adapt information to meet individual needs and internal discussions. The curriculum consists of four modules:

Module 1: Understanding Lead – provides an overview of lead, its impacts and actions that can be taken to reduce potential lead exposures and lead poisoning; Module 2: Effective Cleaning Techniques – explains and demonstrates recommended cleaning techniques for reducing household lead dust; Module 3: Personal Hygiene and Nutrition – focuses on the connection between personal hygiene and nutrition for children and potential exposures to lead; and Module 4: Hiring Certified Lead Professionals – emphasizes the importance of hiring a certified lead professional to follow lead-safe work practices to reduce exposures to lead.

GOAL 4: SUPPORT AND CONDUCT CRITICAL RESEARCH TO INFORM EFFORTS TO REDUCE LEAD EXPOSURES AND RELATED HEALTH RISKS

Key Priorities: Prioritize and Address the critical research and data needs to inform lead policies and guide decisions

Enhance and apply data and tools (e.g., models or approaches) and determine the key drivers of blood lead levels (BLLs) from multimedia exposures to inform lead regulatory decisions and site assessments.

On track

Co-led cross-Agency research workshop with HHS and HUD, including participation of CDC/ATSDR, FDA, CPSA and other agencies (Bethesda, MD). EPA progress on the evaluation, updating and use of blood lead models was presented at the 12/2019 Federal Lead Action Plan workshop.

Continued progress on evaluation of updated Integrated Exposure-Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model used for regulatory decisions.

The EPA Science Advisory Board’s peer review of the updated All Ages Lead Model (AALM) and its technical documentation was overall very positive at the public meeting; written SAB comments to come.

Drafted Federal Lead Action Plan research workshop summary report.

Added batch-mode capability to updated AALM to allow rapid calculation of estimate BLLs for large datasets.

Drafted report on evaluation of updated IEUBK 2.0 model.

Drafted manuscript on SHEDS-IEUBK exposure-internal BLL model submitted for peer-reviewed publication.

Finalize December 2019 Federal Lead Action Plan Research Workshop report.

Receipt of SAB report following peer review panel including tiered recommendations. Draft response to SAB recommendations on AALM.

Draft manuscript on evaluation of updated IEUBK 2.0 model.

Respond to reviewers’ comments on peer-reviewed manuscript on SHEDS-IEUBK exposure-internal BLL model.

Batch mode capability for the AALM allows for rapid estimation of BLLs from large datasets. This is important for processing data from epidemiological or exposure studies; it is also critical for stochastic exposure modeling of blood lead levels. The latter is important for potential use of the AALM in considering the impact of changes in rules, policies or practices.

SHEDS-IEUBK linked model provides probabilistic estimates of contributions of different environmental media (air, water, food, soil) to at different percentiles of BLL for different age ranges in young children.

Generate data, maps and mapping tools to identify high exposure communities or locations and disparities for prioritization efforts to reduce children’s blood lead levels.

On track

Co-led cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD, including participation of CDC/ATSDR, FDA, CPSA and other agencies (Bethesda, MD). EPA's research on lead mapping to identify high lead exposure locations was presented at the 12/2019 Federal Lead Action Plan workshop.

Provided technical assistance to other regional partners as they worked on identifying high exposure locations.

Provided additional maps and data analyses for Michigan as requested by EPA’s Region 5 for continued technical support to identify high lead exposure locations and inform targeting efforts and joint planning with state partners.

Participated in EPA’s Region 5 meetings with their state partners including Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy) and Department of Health and Human Services and in a kick-off call with ASTHO and ECOS and EPA’s R5 under EPA’s MOA with these organizations to initiate an FY20 pilot project on mapping lead exposure risk with collaboration of state public health and environmental officials.

Drafted Federal Lead Action Plan research workshop summary report.

Provided continued technical assistance to EPA regional partners as they worked on identifying high exposure locations.

Provided additional maps and data analyses for Michigan as requested by EPA’s Region 5 for continued technical support to identify high lead exposure locations and inform targeting efforts and joint planning with state partners.

Participated in EPA’s Region 5 meetings with their state partners including Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy) and Department of Health and Human Services and in a call with ASTHO and ECOS and EPA’s R5 to discuss mapping higher lead exposure locations with collaboration of state public health and environmental officials.

Provided summary of lead mapping and data analysis research efforts for Ohio as requested by EPA Region 5 for their Ohio Governor’s Lead Advisory Committee, reflecting EPA collaborations with Ohio state partners.

Obtained data sharing agreement approvals for more comprehensive children’s blood lead data sets from MI and OH, to inform additional mapping analyses for joint planning.

Provided mapping assistance to EPA Region 1 as requested for their lead geographic initiative with the State of Connecticut. Shared several data layers to inform targeting efforts, including one from HUD shared through interagency collaborations.

Presented lead mapping efforts conducted for EPA Region 6 to the Arkansas Dept of Energy & Environment and Department of Health, to discuss possible collaborations with data sharing and analyses.

Provided lead mapping results and updates as requested by Region 7 for their inter-Federal Agency Lead Task force follow-up meeting.

Finalize December 2019 Federal Lead Action Plan Research Workshop report.

Participate in continued discussions with Region 5 state partners on the development of peer-reviewed methodology for identifying high lead exposure locations.

Q3 progress on continued planned technical support for Regions 1 and 5 depends on availability and priorities of state health department partners.

Generate data to address critical gaps for reducing uncertainty in lead modeling and mapping for exposure/risk analyses and for estimating population-wide health benefits of actions to reduce lead exposures.

On track

Co-led cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD, including participation of CDC/ATSDR, FDA, CPSA and other agencies (Bethesda, MD). Progress on bioavailability and innovative methods to reduce soil lead toxic exposures was presented at the 12/2019 Federal Lead Action Plan workshop.

Drafted Federal Lead Action Plan research workshop summary report.

Continued to process of drinking water, soil and dust samples received from the HUD sponsored American Healthy Homes Survey II to estimate total lead in these different media and the bioavailability of the lead in a representative set of the soil and dust samples, with HUD.

Developed and obtained internal approval of STAR RFA on soil and dust ingestion by children.

Finalize December 2019 Federal Lead Action Plan Research Workshop report.

Laboratory processing of drinking water, soil and dust samples received from the HUD sponsored American Healthy Homes Survey II is delayed by COVID-19 COOP closing of laboratories.

Release STAR RFA on soil and dust ingestion by children.

For more information on the HUD sponsored American Healthy Homes Survey II, click here.

Processing of drinking water, soil and dust samples received from the HUD sponsored American Healthy Homes Survey II to estimate total lead in these different media and the bioavailability of the lead in a representative set of the soil and dust samples will continue when normal working conditions return.

Identify approaches to prevent, mitigate and communicate about lead exposures and risks in exposed communities.

On track

Co-led cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD, including participation of CDC/ATSDR, FDA, CPSA and other agencies (Bethesda, MD). Progress and proposed research to mitigate lead risk from water systems was presented at the 12/2019 Federal Lead Action Plan workshop.

Drafted Federal Lead Action Plan research workshop summary report.

Provided ongoing technical support to assess effectiveness of corrosion control treatment in multiple cities applying innovative lead mitigation methods for addressing lead in drinking water. Progressed on research using drinking water sampling methods to identify the presence of lead service lines.

Progressed on the development of a premise plumbing model.

Developed methods for producing standardized lead phosphate nanoparticles for potential use in water filter design.

Drafted updated lead research web content for posting to internet.

Finalize December 2019 Federal Lead Action Plan Research Workshop report.

Draft peer-reviewed manuscripts on water sampling strategies for lead service line identification and report on methods for producing standardized lead phosphate nanoparticles for potential use in water filter design.

Develop reports on technical support provided to multiple communities.

Research using drinking water sampling methods to identify the presence of lead service lines is delayed due to COVID-19 COOP interruption of field work.

Post updated lead research web content on EPA lead research web page.

EPA HQ and Region 6, in partnership with EPA Region 6 states and the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators, held the May 21-22, 2019 workshop to provide information and training relevant to small drinking water systems. This meeting was an extension of EPA’s Annual Drinking Water Workshop and the first designed to bring together EPA and regional experts to focus on small systems challenges that states in the region are facing. The objectives were: 1) Understand compliance issues faced by small drinking water systems in Region 6 states; 2) Address these technical challenges through ideas and information exchange; and 3) Provide a forum for networking. Region 6 has received positive feedback from their respective states on the meeting content and the information that was brought back with the attendees.

Evaluate the effectiveness of actions (e.g., interventions, programs, policies, enforcement) to prevent lead exposure, mitigate health effects and communicate on lead exposures/risks.

On track

Co-led the development of a cross-agency research workshop with HHS and HUD. Progress on research to evaluate the effectiveness of lead mitigation actions at a Superfund site was presented at the 12/2019 Federal Lead Action Plan Workshop.

Drafted Federal Lead Action Plan Research Workshop summary report.

EPA, with support from the Douglas County Health Department and the City of Omaha, continued to prepare its report on the effectiveness of the actions to address lead contamination in residential soil, dust and paint at the Omaha Lead Superfund Site in reducing elevated blood-lead levels in young children.

Drafted updated lead research web content for posting to EPA lead research web page.

Finalize December 2019 Federal Lead Action Plan Research Workshop report.

Prepare peer-reviewed manuscripton the effectiveness of the actions to address lead contamination in residential soil, dust and paint at the Omaha Lead Superfund Site in reducing elevated blood-lead levels in young children.

Post updated lead research web content on EPA’s lead research web page.

 

Top of Page