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Mercury and Air Toxics Standards

Regulatory Actions - Final Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for Power Plants

Final Rule Extends E-Reporting

March 29, 2017 - EPA finalized portions of its proposal to streamline “e-reporting” in MATS.  The final rule allows power plants to submit certain emissions reports as PDFs until July 1, 2018, while EPA works to put a single e-reporting system in place for MATS. The final rule also clarifies two mercury measurement quality assurance instructions.  EPA continues to review comments on the other issues that were part of the MATS e-reporting streamlining proposal.

Proposed Rule to Streamline E-Reporting Requirements
August 23, 2016 – EPA is proposing changes to the electronic reporting requirements for MATS.  This is the next step toward streamlining the “e-reporting” requirements in MATS so power plants can submit all the required emissions data through a single, familiar electronic system -- rather than two separate systems.

  • More Information - includes proposed rule, fact sheet, and draft MATS compliance report instructions

Denials of Petitions for Reconsideration – Startup and Shutdown Provisions
August 8, 2016 -- EPA denied two petitions for reconsideration of the startup and shutdown provisions in MATS. This means that the startup and shutdown provisions that EPA finalized in November 2014 remain in place. Following a process outlined in the Clean Air Act, EPA carefully considered the petitions which asked EPA to provide an additional opportunity for public comment on certain aspects of the work practice standards for power plants during startup and shutdown periods, among other issues. EPA denied the requests for reconsideration because the public had ample opportunity to comment on the issues during the public comment period.

Final Finding: Consideration of Cost in the Appropriate and Necessary Finding for the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards for Power Plants
April 14, 2016 - EPA is issuing a final finding that it is appropriate and necessary to set standards for emissions of air toxics from coal- and oil-fired power plants. This finding responds to a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that EPA must consider cost in the appropriate and necessary finding supporting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS).

Final Technical Corrections

March 17, 2016 - EPA finalized a number of clarifying changes and corrections to the final Mercury and Air Toxics Standards.

November 20, 2015 – After assessing costs in several different ways, EPA is proposing to find that considering costs does not alter the determination that it is appropriate to regulate the emissions of toxic air pollution from power plants. EPA is proposing this supplemental finding in response to a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court.

April 21, 2015 – EPA completed the review of the remaining requests to reconsider certain aspects of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for power plants. After careful consideration, EPA has decided to deny all remaining requests - a step that affirms the agency’s approach in the final MATS rule and provides stakeholders with certainty moving forward. 

March 9, 2015EPA issued an interim final rule that will allow owners or operators of electric generating units to submit to EPA, in PDF format, emissions and compliance reports for the Mercury and Air Toxics rule.  This rule clarifies that these reports should include complete (not summary) performance test data.

EPA Proposes Technical Corrections to the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards

December 19, 2014  – EPA is proposing a technical corrections memo on the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards for power plants that would resolve conflicts between preamble and regulatory text and clarify some of the language in the regulatory text. The public will have 30 days to review and comment on the proposal after publication in the Federal Register.

November 7, 2014 – EPA completed its reconsideration of the startup and shutdown provisions applicable to coal- and oil-fired electric utilities under the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS). This final rule includes updated definitions and work practice standards. EPA is also adjusting certain monitoring and testing requirements related to periods of startup and shutdown.

EPA Issues Direct Final Rule on e-Reporting and the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards for Power Plants

November 7, 2014 – EPA issued a direct final rule and a parallel proposed rule to allow sources to comply with the MATS reporting requirements while we revise the Emissions Collection Monitoring Plan System (ECMPS) to accept all reporting that is required in the MATS rule. The rule is the first of two rulemakings that are designed to provide a single place for industry to submit their reports and data electronically. This action allows industry to submit data in PDF form for an interim time period. EPA is publishing these reporting requirements as a direct final rule because the changes are noncontroversial and no adverse comments are anticipated. If adverse comments are received, EPA will withdraw the direct final rule and address the comments when issuing a final rule based on the parallel proposal that is being issued in conjunction with the direct final rule.

Direct Final Rule (PDF) (5 pp, 267 K About PDF) - Federal Register - November 19, 2014
Parallel Proposal (PDF) (2 pp, 219 K About PDF) - Federal Register - November 19, 2014
 

June 25, 2013 – EPA is reopening, for 60 days, the public comment period on the startup and shutdown provisions included in the November 2012 proposed updates to pollution limits for new power plants under Mercury and Air Toxics Standards. Interested groups will have the opportunity to review new information provided during the original public comment period and subsequent EPA analysis of that information.

EPA Updates the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards for New Power Plants

March 28, 2013 - EPA updated emission limits for new power plants under the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS). The updates only apply to future power plants; do not change the types of state-of-the-art pollution controls that they are expected to install; and will not significantly change costs or public health benefits of the rule.

Final Rule and Fact Sheet

EPA Extends Public Comment Period on Proposed MATS Reconsideration; No Public Hearing Requested

December 12, 2012 - EPA has extended the comment period on the MATS reconsideration proposal by one week - until January 7, 2013. The Office of the Federal Register mistakenly published the MATS reconsideration proposal in the "final rules" section of the Nov. 30, 2012, Federal Register, and published a correction notice stating the inaccuracy on Dec. 5, 2012. Also, EPA did not receive any requests to hold a public hearing on this proposal, so no public hearing will be held.

Notice of public comment extension (PDF) (2 pp, 199 K About PDF) - Federal Register - December 12, 2012
Correction notice (PDF) (1 p, 205 K About PDF) - Federal Register - December 5, 2012
 

November 16, 2012 - EPA proposed to update emission limits for new power plants under the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS). The updates would only apply to future power plants; would not change the types of state-of-the-art pollution controls that they are expected to install; and would not significantly change costs or public health benefits of the rule. The public will have the opportunity to comment for 30 days after publication in the Federal Register and at a public hearing in Washington D.C. if one is requested.

July 20, 2012 - EPA will review new technical information that is focused on toxic air pollution limits for new power plants under the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards. This reconsideration does not cover the standards set for existing power plants.

EPA Announces Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for Power Plants

December 21, 2011 - EPA announced standards to limit mercury, acid gases and other toxic pollution from power plants.