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EPA to Hold Public Availability Sessions about Orlando Gasification Plant Superfund Site in Orlando, Florida on March 1, 2018

Contact Information: 
Dawn Harris-Young (
(404) 562-8421 (Direct), (404) 562-8400 (Main)

ATLANTA (February 28, 2018) – United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in collaboration with the Potentially Responsible Parties Group (PRP Group), will hold public availability sessions about the Orlando Gasification Plant Superfund Site in Orlando, Fla. on March 1, 2018.

The purpose of the availability sessions is to give the community an opportunity to ask questions about the upcoming soil excavation activities as part of the Remedial Action at the site. Representatives from the EPA, PRP Group and the Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry will be available to answer questions and share information.

What:   Orlando Gasification Plant Superfund Site in Orlando, Fla. Public Availability Sessions

When:  Thursday, March 1, 2018

            Two sessions:  12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Where: Callahan Neighborhood Center, 101 N. Parramore Avenue, Orlando, Fla.

Who:    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4

Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry

Responsible Parties Group (PRP Group)

The site is located near downtown Orlando, Florida, between the 400 and 600 blocks of West Robinson Street. The site includes six properties on the north and south sides of West Robinson Street. These properties are fenced and include office space and a commercial storage facility. Surrounding properties are primarily commercial and industrial. Residential properties, schools and churches are located within a few blocks of the site.

While in operation (from 1887 until 1960), the facility heated coal to produce gas for cooking, lighting, heating and industrial purposes. The primary waste material from the gas manufacturing process was coal tar, which contains polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and is a source of contamination at the site. Poor waste handling practices led to contamination of the site’s soil and groundwater. EPA is addressing the site through the Superfund Alternative Approach. In this approach, EPA uses the same investigation and cleanup process and standards used for sites listed on the National Priorities List (NPL).

Under Administrator Pruitt’s leadership, the Superfund program has reemerged as a top priority to advance the Agency’s core mission of protecting human health and the environment.

More information on EPA's cleanup work at the Orlando Gasification Plant Superfund Site (

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