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News Releases

News Releases from HeadquartersLand and Emergency Management (OLEM)

"Pruitt Has Made Superfund Clean-Ups a Priority"

01/03/2018
Contact Information: 
EPA Press Office (press@epa.gov)

EPA announced progress on cleaning up some of America’s most contaminated sites yesterday, here is what they are saying around the country…

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Casper Star Tribune: "An area of contaminated groundwater beneath a housing development in Evansville has been partially removed from the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Priorities List, about 30 years after it was designated a superfund site... crossing superfund sites off the list is evidence of the agency’s priorities." (Casper Star Tribune, 1/2/18)

Pacific Standard (Santa Barbara, CA): "EPA administrator Scott Pruitt has made Superfund clean-ups a priority since taking over the agency... Three Superfund sites across Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Alabama were removed from the list entirely after the EPA and the states agreed that the clean-up was complete." (Pacific Standard, 1/2/18)

Standard Speaker (Hazleton, PA): “A federal Superfund site in Foster Twp. will be removed from the list of the most hazardous waste sites in the country this spring… ‘The site no longer poses a threat to the community.’” (Standard Speaker, 1/2/18)

The Washington Examiner: “The Environmental Protection Agency is starting off the new year claiming progress on cleaning up the nation’s most contaminated toxic land areas, known as Superfund sites.” (Washington Examiner, 1/2/18)

E&E News: "Since Pruitt took office last February, EPA has removed three tracts from its national priorities list of Superfund sites. The deletions of the Perdido Ground Water Contamination Site in Alabama, Nutting Truck and Caster Co. in Minnesota, and Shpack Landfill in Massachusetts were possible because the cleanup efforts were finished and no further actions were required to protect human health or the environment." (E&E News, 1/2/18)

The Hill: "EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is touting the deletions as a victory in his mission to chip away at the 1,300 or so sites for which the agency is overseeing cleanups... Some former Superfund sites can be reused for new development, which is a goal of the program and an emphasis of Pruitt’s efforts to boost the program." (The Hill, 1/2/18)