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Report Pesticide Exposure Incidents Affecting Pets or Domestic Animals

Options for Reporting by Pet Owners

  • If your animal needs medical attention right now, call your local veterinarian, a local emergency clinic, or the National Animal Poison Control Center (NAPCC) at (888) 426-4435. Exit NAPCC may charge a fee, unless you contact them via the National Pesticide Information Center.
  • Tell the product's manufacturer, who is required by law to submit reports of adverse effects to EPA. Their contact information is on the product label. 
  • For non-emergencies, you can call the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC) at (800) 858-7378 Exit to find out more about reporting a possible pesticide exposure or illness. NPIC also provides summary reports to EPA on incidents, but does not collect information for enforcement.
  • Contact your state pesticide regulatory agency, Exit especially if you are concerned about a possibly illegal use of a pesticide. States generally have primary enforcement responsibility for pesticide misuse violations and for investigating possible instances of pesticide misuse.
  • Submit a report to EPA if you suspect that federal pesticide regulations have been violated.
  • For any non-registrant wanting to report incidents involving pets or domestic animals that may not involve violation of pesticide regulations, send us an email. If available, useful information includes:
    • Type and number of animals exposed.
    • Size, breed and age of the animal.
    • Condition of the animal, e.g., symptoms exhibited, current health status.
    • The pesticide involved (include EPA registration number if available).
    • Any other pertinent information.

Reporting by Veterinarians

  • NPIC offers an online Veterinary Pesticide Incident Reporting Portal Exitwhere veterinarians and their staff can submit reports to NPIC, for surveillance purposes (not enforcement). NPIC staff are also available to veterinarians for general pesticide-related questions regarding animal exposures.