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EPA Research

EPA Tools and Resources Webinar: Recent Enhancements to the CMAQ Modeling System

Date and Time

Wednesday 01/16/2019 3:00PM to 4:00PM EST
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Details

Register and join the webinarEXIT In addition to webinar audio, you may dial: 1-866-299-3188 Access Code: 202-564-6669.

The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System is a comprehensive state-of-the-science air pollution modeling system that is widely used worldwide to study local to hemispheric air pollution issues and guide development of air pollution abatement strategies. For over two decades, EPA and states have used CMAQ to support air quality management. CMAQ is continually updated to incorporate knowledge on the state of the science and harness increased computing power in order to more effectively and efficiently characterize air quality and protect human health. Newer versions of the modeling system are publicly released on a periodic basis. CMAQv5.3 is scheduled for public release in summer 2019.

This webinar will provide an overview of the new features in CMAQv5.3: more detailed representation of the characteristics of particulate matter (PM), expanded chemistry for ozone and PM formation from global-to-local scales, more complex land and atmosphere interactions to support both air quality and ecosystems applications, increased emphasis on pollutants originating outside the US, increased scientific consistency between meteorology and chemistry models, and greater flexibility to support increasingly diverse uses of CMAQ. 

Event Type

Webinar