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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Maryland

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Bush Valley Landfill

The 16-acre Bush Valley Landfill Superfund site is located in Harford County, Maryland. From 1975 to 1983, a landfill operated on the site. Landfill operations contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup included an impermeable landfill cap to prevent further groundwater contamination, a landfill gas management system, environmental monitoring and land-use restrictions. The site is now green space and wildlife habitat. It serves as a buffer between developed areas and the neighboring Bush Declaration Natural Resources Management Area.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.
 

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Chemical Metals Industries, Inc. Capped Site Reuse

The Chemical Metals Industries (CMI) Superfund site is located in Baltimore, Maryland. It includes two separate properties. CMI operated a chemical manufacturing facility and recovered precious metals at one property. CMI used the other property, an inactive gas station, to store waste and scrap metal. Leaking drums on both properties prompted inspections. Investigations found extensive contamination and the potential for fire or explosion. EPA proposed the site for listing on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1981 but did not finalize the listing after EPA cleanup actions finished, mitigating the threat posed by the site. EPA, with support from the Maryland Department of Environmental Protection (MDE), removed contaminated drums, debris and liquid waste from the site and capped the area to prevent further exposure to contamination. After further investigations by EPA in 1998 found the cap was deteriorating, EPA removed contaminated soil from beneath the cap and replaced the cap. The former gas station property remains vacant. MDE currently operates an emergency response field office on the former chemical manufacturing facility property.
Last updated June 2017
 
As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.
 

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Kane & Lombard Street Drums Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Driving range at the Kane & Lombard Steel Drum siteKane & Lombard Street DrumsThe 10-acre Kane & Lombard Street Drums Superfund site is located at the corner of Kane and Lombard streets in Baltimore, Maryland. For more than 22 years, an open dump for demolition, municipal and industrial wastes operated at the site. Disposal activities resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater. Following investigations, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA worked closely with the community, the Maryland Department of the Environment, and a private investment group on a cleanup that was compatible with redevelopment. EPA removed waste drums, installed a subsurface barrier to prevent further contamination of groundwater and capped contaminated soil. EPA also restricted land and groundwater use to prevent exposure to contaminated soil and groundwater. Today, site uses include a golf driving range, a parking lot, a cellular telephone tower, a sea-land trailer repair facility and a trucking facility.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 105 people and generated an estimated $12,982,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Mid-Atlantic Wood Preservers, Inc. Capped Site Reuse

Mid-Atlantic Wood Preservers, Inc.Mid-Atlantic Wood Preservers, Inc.The Mid-Atlantic Wood Preservers, Inc. Superfund site is located in Harmans, Maryland. A wood treatment facility operated on site from 1974 to 1993. In 1978, investigations found site soils and groundwater contaminated with chemicals from facility operations. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1993, the site’s potentially responsible party led cleanup activities under EPA oversight. Cleanup included removing contaminated soil from a neighboring property and covering the entire 3-acre facility with an asphalt cap. In 1994, EPA entered into a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) with Gunther’s Leasing & Transport, a neighboring property owner. The PPA enabled the company to expand its operations and use part of the site as a parking lot and for office space. Local Machine Service, Inc. leases the former treatment building on site and operates a recreational boat repair shop. Sharp Energy operates a propane tank and fuel storage facility on site. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2000.
Last updated February 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed one person and generated an estimated $77,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Middletown Road Dump

The 15-acre Middletown Road Dump Superfund site is located near Annapolis, Maryland. A dump on site accepted rubble, construction debris, and municipal and industrial waste for several decades without proper state permits. The dump shut down in 1981, after a site inspection found crushed and deteriorating drums as well as debris contaminated with hazardous substances. After sampling found soil contamination threatened groundwater and nearby surface water, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal and off-site disposal of drums, contaminated soil and debris. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1988. Current site uses include a residence and a firewood supply business.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 11 people and generated an estimated $540,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Ordnance Products, Inc.

The 95-acre Ordnance Products, Inc. Superfund site is located in the town of North East, Maryland. From 1960 to 1972, a manufacturing plant produced ordnance products such as grenade fuses and detonators on site. Plant operators buried burned waste in open pits and discharged waste into five unlined surface locations. These practices resulted in contamination of groundwater, soil, sediment and sludge. Investigations also found site-related contamination in nearby residential drinking water wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1997. Cleanup included removal of hazardous materials and contaminated soil. Cleanup also included installing and maintaining treatment systems on affected residential groundwater wells to provide homes with safe drinking water. In 2012, EPA installed vapor intrusion mitigation systems at two houses. EPA completed a remedial action to address groundwater contamination in September 2015. A propane distribution facility currently operates at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses generated an estimated $287,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Southern Maryland Wood Treating

The Southern Maryland Wood Treating site after clean up, revegetated with native wildflowers and grains to create a wildlife habitat.Southern Maryland Wood TreatingThe Southern Maryland Wood Treating (SMWT) Superfund site is located in Hollywood, Maryland. Wetlands cover most of the 94-acre area. From 1965 to 1978, wood-treating operations took place on 25 acres of the site. Wood-treating activities resulted in contamination of soil, groundwater and a stream next to the site. In the early 1980s, site owners abandoned the property, leaving processing equipment and deteriorating containers of chemicals behind. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. To clean up the site, EPA removed contaminated soil and sediment and heat-treated the material to remove hazardous substances. The cleanup allows for unrestricted future use. In 2000 and 2001, EPA regraded the site and planted a mix of wildflowers and grains to restore wildlife habitat on site. Groundwater monitoring ended in 2003. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2005. In addition to hosting wildlife habitat, the site is available for unrestricted reuse.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Woodlawn County Landfill Green Infrastructure Reuse

The 37-acre Woodlawn County Landfill Superfund site is located in Cecil County, Maryland. A sand-and-gravel quarry operated on site and then Cecil County operated a municipal landfill on site from 1960 to 1978. Between 1978 and 1981, operators disposed of polyvinyl chloride industrial sludge at the site. Landfill operations resulted in contaminated soil and groundwater as well as the sediments of a stream that crosses the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) cleaned up the site. Cleanup activities, completed in 2001, included placement of a vegetative soil cover over the waste. The cleanup also included monitoring of the natural breakdown of groundwater contaminants. Long-term maintenance and monitoring activities are ongoing. The PRPs installed the vegetative soil cover to support wildlife habitat and maintain the Woodlawn Wildlife Habitat Area. Local schools, the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America, and the community visit the site for nature and science projects, environmental education and recreation.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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