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Superfund Sites in Reuse in Nebraska

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Bruno Co-Op Association/Associated Properties

The Bruno Co-Op Association/Associated Properties Superfund site is located in Bruno, Nebraska. The site includes two formerly-contaminated municipal wells and a groundwater plume. Since the 1940s, grain storage facilities have operated on site. Site operators poured or pumped chemicals into the grain to control pests, resulting in the contamination of groundwater below the site. In 1986, testing by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services detected chemicals in two public drinking water supply wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. EPA temporarily supplied bottled water to affected residents and then connected the residents of Bruno to the public water supply. Bruno’s former public water supply wells are now used only as a water supply for fire suppression. EPA continues to collect water samples from nearby private drinking water supply wells. To date, EPA has not detected any site-related contaminants in these wells. Land use controls restrict the use of the contaminated groundwater under the site. A farmers’ cooperative is active on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 3 people and generated an estimated $451,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Cleburn Street Well

The Cleburn Street Well Superfund site includes several areas of soil and groundwater contamination in downtown Grand Island, Nebraska. Prior to 1986, the Cleburn Street Well provided drinking water to the City of Grand Island. Contamination detected in the well in 1986 led to EPA’s involvement at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. EPA traced contamination to three dry-cleaning facilities – One Hour Martinizing (OHM), Liberty Services and Ideal Cleaners of Grand Island. A fourth source area is the former location of Nebraska Solvents, a solvents distribution company. In 1993, EPA installed a groundwater extraction well at the OHM facility and used several treatment techniques to address contaminated groundwater. EPA is exploring additional remedies to address remaining groundwater contamination. A church and an auto mechanic shop are currently located at the former OHM facility. Commercial dry-cleaning operations at Ideal Cleaners are ongoing. The Grand Island Public Works Department’s Street Division leases part of the former Nebraska Solvents area for a sign shop and for truck and equipment storage and maintenance.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 7 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 27 people and generated an estimated $2,939,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Garvey Elevator

The Garvey Elevator Superfund site is located in Adams County, Nebraska. Garvey Elevators (Garvey) owned and operated a grain elevator on 22 acres of the 106-acre property until 1998, when Ag Processing (AGP) took over operations. Carbon tetrachloride, which Garvey used as a pest-control grain fumigant until 1985, contaminated soil and groundwater at the site. The groundwater contaminant plume extends about four miles from the facility. Prior to EPA’s involvement and as part of its limited site characterization and cleanup efforts under state oversight, Garvey connected some impacted residences to the municipal water supply and built groundwater and soil treatment systems on its property. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2005. Garvey entered into an Administrative Order on Consent to determine the nature and extent of contamination and evaluate cleanup alternatives. Garvey also entered into a three-party agreement with EPA and AGP to sell the property to AGP, with Garvey using proceeds from the sale to perform cleanup work. Garvey declared bankruptcy in 2008. EPA took over ongoing cleanup activities on the Garvey property and characterization of the site in its entirety. EPA extended municipal water lines to all impacted and occupied residences. EPA has implemented selected remedial actions to address contaminated soil and groundwater on the 22-acre property and is currently designing the remedy for the groundwater plume extending from the facility. Since purchasing Garvey property in 2005, AGP has continued to operate its grain storage facility and cultivate crops on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 10 people and generated an estimated $1,405,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Hastings Ground Water Contamination Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Hastings Energy Center, a coal-fired power plant, uses treated water from the FAR-MAR-CO subsite as cooling waterHastings Ground Water ContaminationThe Hastings Ground Water Contamination Superfund site in Hastings, Nebraska, is one of EPA's largest and most complex groundwater cleanup projects. State investigations showed that industrial and commercial grain chemicals had contaminated area soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup included capping, alternate water supplies for affected users, a well inventory, land use controls and groundwater monitoring. EPA divided the site into seven sub-sites to manage the cleanup. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers worked with EPA and the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality on a groundwater extraction and treatment system that reuses treated groundwater, and has cleaned up surface soil contamination at the former Naval Ammunition Depot sub-site. Closing wells, monitoring groundwater and limiting access to soil have protected public health at the other sub-sites. From the outset of the Superfund process, EPA and the City of Hastings focused on how the cleanup could benefit the community. Several private and public entities are now located at the former Naval Ammunition Depot, including the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Nebraska National Guard, Central Community College and several private landowners. The Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District also maintains about 1,000 acres of the site as the McMurtry Waterfowl Production Area. The area provides protected habitat for migrating birds, whitetail deer, burrowing owls and prairie dogs. The City uses treated groundwater to irrigate the city park. When irrigation water is not required, the water flows to a manmade lake. After installation of the site’s 55-acre landfill cap in 2005, the City of Hastings opened a dog park in the area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 39 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,071 people and generated an estimated $272,609,819 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Iowa-Nebraska Light & Power Co.

The Iowa-Nebraska Light & Power Co. Superfund site, a former manufactured gas plant, is located on 2 acres in downtown Norfolk, Madison County, Nebraska. Waste products from the manufactured gas process are present in soil and groundwater at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in April 2016. Black Hills/Nebraska Gas Utility Company and Nebraska Public Power District own parts of the site. In 2014, EPA oversaw the site’s potentially responsible party-led cleanup, which included building demolition and removal and off-site disposal of contaminated source material. The Black Hills portion of the site is a concrete parking lot. The Nebraska Public Power District portion of the site is a fenced gravel lot.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Lindsay Manufacturing Co.

The Lindsay Manufacturing Co. (LMC) Superfund site is located in Lindsay, Nebraska. In 1965, LMC began operating on site. LMC currently makes galvanized irrigation sprinkler equipment on site. Between 1971 and 1982, the facility discharged process wastes into an unlined earthen lagoon on site. Use of the lagoon ceased in 1983, when monitoring identified contamination. Improper waste management also resulted in groundwater contamination beneath the facility. As a result, the facility began treating the groundwater. In 1989, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA expanded the cleanup to include area soil. During cleanup, EPA invited the company to consider an innovative technology to study the use of sprinkler equipment in hazardous waste cleanups. This presented a business opportunity for LMC and prompted the firm to use the idea for cleanup at its own site. EPA approved the plan in 1997. Today, both LMC and the farmer who owned the wells affected by contamination are benefiting from this unique cleanup approach. EPA and the State are allowing the use of treated groundwater as seasonal irrigation for the farmer's corn crops. What began as a routine groundwater cleanup became a partnership between the responsible party and a neighboring farmer, reducing the operating cost of the groundwater cleanup system by about $100,000 per year. An industrial facility currently operates on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 522 people and generated an estimated $190,896,857 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Nebraska Ordnance Plant (Former) Alternative Energy Reuse Green Remediation Reuse

The 17,250-acre Nebraska Ordnance Plant (Former) Superfund site is located in Mead, Nebraska. A munitions production plant operated on site from 1942 to 1956, during World War II and the Korean War. Site operations included munitions loading, assembling, packing and storage as well as ammonium nitrate production. Decades of plant operations resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup included the incineration of contaminated soil and groundwater pumping and treatment. Nearby property owners use some of the treated water for irrigation and a pond. About 9,000 acres at the site belong to the University of Nebraska. The University operates an agricultural research and development center on site and uses groundwater for crop irrigation and livestock watering. The U.S. Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve retained about 1,000 acres for training. The U.S. Army uses 12 acres for a Nike Missile maintenance area. The U.S. Air Force acquired 2,000 site acres to build the Offutt Air Force Base Atlas Missile site. The U.S. Department of Commerce acquired 40 acres. Private individuals and corporations own remaining site acreage. Several businesses are located in the plant’s former administration buildings. The companies make insulation boards and process styrene foam packing material.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 10 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 167 people and generated an estimated $39,276,667 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Omaha Lead

The roughly 17,300-acre Omaha Lead Superfund site is located in Douglas County, Nebraska. From the early 1870s until 1997, a lead-refining plant operated on 23 acres of the site in downtown Omaha. Operations resulted in the emission of lead and other heavy metals into the atmosphere. Wind transported the contaminants and deposited them on the ground surface. Sampling of soil across more than 41,000 residential properties found widespread lead contamination. Blood sampling data from young children compiled by Douglas County Health Department show a high rate of elevated blood lead levels in areas near the former lead refinery. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2003. Cleanup activities include removal of soil from childcare facilities and residential properties, cleaning of home interiors, and public health education. The area remains in residential use; lead cleanup and exterior lead-based paint stabilization efforts are ongoing. EPA completed the EPA-lead portion of the cleanup of 13,000+ residential properties in December 2015. The City of Omaha is currently working under a cooperative agreement with EPA to clean up about 1,000 additional residential properties. EPA anticipates that the City of Omaha will complete this work by 2022.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Sherwood Medical Co.

The 60-acre Sherwood Medical Co. Superfund site is located in Norfolk, Madison County, Nebraska. Park Mobile Home Court (PMHC) is located on the northern/northeastern part of the site. The southern part of the site, covering about 40 acres, includes a manufacturing plant. Since 1962, Sherwood Medical Company and its successors have made medical syringes and other medical products using injection-molding processes at the plant. Chlorinated solvents were used in the manufacturing process. The solvents reached the on-site septic system through floor drains, which resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. In the late 1980s, EPA and Nebraska Department of Health sampling results showed contamination in nearby wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Cleanup included removal of contaminated soil, groundwater extraction and treatment, groundwater monitoring, and removal of the septic and underground storage tank systems. Cleanup also included providing drinking water to PMHC residents and other affected properties. The site remains in industrial use.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 551 people and generated an estimated $56,449,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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