Sustainable Management of Food

United States Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions

On this page:


About the U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions

In November 2016, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the formation of the U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions group and presented the first set of 2030 Champions.

U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions are businesses and organizations that have made a public commitment to reduce food loss and waste in their own operations in the United States by 50 percent by the year 2030.

The staggering amount of wasted food in the United States has far-reaching impacts on resource conservation and food security, while costing businesses and consumers money. To help galvanize national efforts to reduce food loss and waste, USDA and EPA announced the United States’ first-ever food loss and waste reduction goal in September 2015, calling for a 50-percent reduction by 2030. Government alone cannot reach this goal. It will require effort and action from the entire food system. The 2030 Champions have heard the Call to Action and are committed to do their part to help the nation reach this critical goal.

Top of Page


List of U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions

The following is a list of our current U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions who have committed to reduce food loss and waste in their own operations in the United States by 50 percent by the year 2030:

  • Ahold USA
  • Blue Apron
  • Bon Appétit Management Company
  • Conagra Brands
  • Delhaize America
  • General Mills, Inc.
  • PepsiCo
  • Weis Markets
  • Kellogg Company
  • Campbell Soup Company
  • Sodexo
  • Walmart and Sam's U.S.
  • Wegmans Food Markets, Inc.
  • Unilever
  • YUM! Brands
  • Sprout Markets
  • Marley Spoon
  • Aramark
  • Whitsons Culinary Group
  • MOM’s Organic Market

Top of Page


Frequent Questions About the U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions

The following are frequent questions about the Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions.

1. What is a U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champion?

U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions are businesses and organizations that have made a public commitment to reduce food loss and waste in their own operations in the United States by 50 percent by the year 2030.

Top of Page

2. How does a company become a U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champion?

To join the U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions, organizations complete and submit the U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions Activity Form, in which they commit to reduce food loss and waste in their own operations and periodically report their progress on their website.

Top of Page

3. Does USDA or EPA verify the Champions’ food loss and waste reduction estimates?

No, neither USDA nor EPA verify or audit the Champions’ food loss and waste estimates. 2030 Champions are responsible for setting their own baselines and measuring their own food loss and waste reductions. They commit to reporting on their progress on their websites.

Top of Page

4. How is food loss and waste defined and measured?

The exact definition of food loss and waste could vary by country, business and consumer. U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions are encouraged to consult the Food Loss and Waste ProtocolExit for information on defining and transparently measuring food loss and waste. It is at the Champion’s discretion whether to calculate the 50% reduction on an absolute or per customer/consumer basis.

Top of Page

5. Does USDA or EPA provide technical support to measure food loss and waste?

U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions can join EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge to access technical assistance for measuring food waste and assessing the positive environmental benefits of waste reduction.

Top of Page

6. Are there any government recognition programs for businesses that are not ready to commit to a 50 percent reduction goal but are working to reduce, recover and recycle food loss and waste in their operations?

Businesses that are not ready to make the 50-percent reduction commitment but are engaged in efforts to reduce food loss and waste in their operations can be recognized for their efforts by either joining Food Recovery Challenge or the U.S. Food Waste Challenge.

Top of Page

7. Why did USDA and EPA establish the U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions and how is it different than the U.S. Food Waste Challenge?

USDA and EPA launched the U.S. Food Waste Challenge in 2013 as a way to raise awareness about food loss and waste in the United States and about steps that businesses and organizations are taking to reduce it. More than 4,000 entities have signed up for the U.S. Food Waste Challenge, demonstrating the growing momentum around this issue in the United States. Reaching the new national goal of cutting food loss and waste in half by 2030, which was announced in 2015, is going to require renewed commitments to aggressively cut food loss and waste. USDA and EPA established the U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions initiative as a way of ramping up national efforts to meet this goal. The U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions initiative is about recognizing those organizations that have committed to cutting food loss and waste in their own operations in half by 2030 and periodically report on their progress.

Top of Page

8. What are the three food loss and waste recognition programs maintained by USDA and EPA?

U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions

Launched in 2016, U.S. Food Loss and Waste 2030 Champions are businesses and organizations that have made a public commitment to reduce food loss and waste in their own operations in the United States by 50 percent by the year 2030.

Food Recovery Challenge

Launched in 2011, the Food Recovery Challenge (FRC) is designed for organizations seeking to track their food waste reduction activities. Members can join as participants if they are generating food waste or as endorsers if they are not generating their own food waste but can help others reduce their waste (i.e., organizations looking to help educate or recruit for the FRC) with requirements to provide data or report activities/accomplishments to the challenge. Members are eligible for awards based on their accomplishments which are given annually. EPA provides technical assistance and a free climate report to participants. The FRC currently has more than 800 participants and has prevented and diverted millions of tons of food since it started.

U.S. Food Waste Challenge

Launched in 2013, the U.S. Food Waste Challenge is designed for organizations seeking to make a public pledge/disclosure of their activities to reduce food waste. Participants make a one-time pledge with their name and activities listed on USDA’s website. The goal of the U.S. Food Waste Challenge is to disseminate information about best practices to reduce, recover, and recycle food loss.

Top of Page