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Resources about Indoor Air Quality for Child Care Providers

There are so many sources of indoor air pollution in childcare facilities that the air is considered to be two to five times more polluted than outdoor air. Common sources of indoor air pollution include combustion sources such as oil, gas, kerosene, coal, wood, and tobacco products; building materials and furnishings as diverse as deteriorated, asbestos-containing insulation, wet or damp carpet, and cabinetry or furniture made of certain pressed wood products; products for household cleaning and maintenance, personal care, or hobbies; central heating and cooling systems and humidification devices; and outdoor sources such as radon, pesticides, and outdoor air pollution.

Children are more susceptible to the effects of contaminated air because they breathe in more oxygen relative to their body weight than adults.The following links provide information about indoor air quality and the steps that can be taken to improve indoor air quality in a childcare facility.

Resources