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Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Former Chevron USA Products Company #122208 in Chillum, Maryland

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Cleanup Status

In April 2008, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued its final decision describing the remedy for a gasoline release that occurred at a former Chevron service station located at 5801 Riggs Road, Chillum, Md., which impacted the adjacent community in the Washington D.C. neighborhood known as Lamond-Riggs Park. The gasoline release occurred in 1989 and reportedly migrated underground to the residential neighborhood in 2001.

EPA's final decision included key ideas from EPA’s proposed plan presented to the community in fall 2007. The EPA also modified the cleanup plans to be even more protective in response to significant comments from the community and D.C. environmental agencies.  

EPA's final decision for the Chevron cleanup included three components that were included in the Statement of Basis that was presented to the community in fall 2007:

(1) Continued operation of the existing groundwater remediation system in Maryland;

(2) Expansion of the existing system by installing angle recovery wells under Eastern Avenue into the District. The additional wells will enhance cleanup of contaminated ground water resulting from the Chevron release. The drinking water for the area comes from a public water supply. As such, there is no known risk to the drinking water from the underground contamination;

(3) Installation of individual vapor mitigation systems in those homes located above the contaminated groundwater plume with measured vapor levels that exceed EPA’s remediation standards for indoor air established in the Statement of Basis.

In response to comments, EPA strengthened its plan by adding:

(1) Installation of an independent remediation system on the District-side of Eastern Avenue which uses an innovative recovery well design combining soil vapor extraction, recirculation groundwater pumping, and air sparging. Treatment takes place inside a large diameter well underground, minimizing both space requirements and disruption to the community.

(2) Installation of an oxygen curtain above Nicholson Street to speed the natural degradation of the groundwater plume. The area above Nicholson Street has a low oxygen level and injecting oxygen will accelerate the natural degradation of dissolved petroleum constituents. The oxygen curtain is a non-mechanical system operated by pressure. It requires little space and will generate minimal noise, so it should not be disruptive to the community except during construction.
 

On August 25, 2008, EPA issued an Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), which was entered into between EPA and Chevron to clean up releases at or from the former Chevron gasoline service station, and requested public comments on the AOC. The AOC to implement the final remedy became effective on January 19, 2009.  During the public comment period, EPA received five sets of comments. EPA has responded to those comments and determined that no modifications to the AOC is necessary.

Since the AOC became effective, the following activities have been performed in accordance with the final remedy:

(1) The existing groundwater remediation system in Maryland has continued to operate;

(2) In June 2012, the existing remediation system in Maryland was expanded by installing an angle recovery well under Eastern Avenue into the District.  Details were presented in the Corrective Measures Construction Report submitted by Chevron to EPA dated July 2012;

(3) In 2008, individual vapor mitigation systems were installed at three homes located in the Lamond-Riggs Park neighborhood.  Details were presented in the Interim Measures Construction Completion Report for Vapor Mitigation Systems submitted by Chevron to EPA in April 2009.  Chevron submitted a letter dated November 7, 2013 to EPA to formally request a termination review and EPA approval that operation and maintenance of the three VMS units in Washington, D.C. be discontinued, as data suggested that these units were no longer necessary to protect human health. In a letter dated January 9, 2014, the EPA approved Chevron’s request to discontinue operation and maintenance of the three VMS units.

(4) In 2013, an independent remediation system was installed and system operations were initiated on the District-side of Eastern Avenue.  Details were presented in the Corrective Measures Implementation Construction Completion Report for Area B: In-Situ Groundwater Remediation System submitted by Chevron to EPA in June 2013.  The system uses an innovative recovery well design combining soil vapor extraction, recirculation groundwater pumping, and air sparging. Treatment takes place inside a large diameter well underground, minimizing both space requirements and disruption to the community. This remediation system continues to operate.

(5) In 2013, an oxygen curtain was installed above Nicholson Street to speed the natural degradation of the groundwater plume. Details were presented in the Corrective Measures Construction Completion Report for Area C: Oxygen Reactive Zone submitted by Chevron to EPA in June 2013.  The oxygen curtain is a non-mechanical system operated by pressure. It requires little space and generates minimal noise so that it is not disruptive to the community. This remediation system continues to operate.

Cleanup Background 

In October 1989, there was a reported release of an unknown amount of gasoline from a Service Station owned and operated by Chevron Products Company, located at 5801 Riggs Road in Chillum, Maryland. The release was initially addressed by the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE).  MDE required Chevron to install a pump and treat system which has been in operation since 1990. 

In April 2001, the gasoline plume was reported to have migrated into the District of Columbia, underlying a residential area known as the Lamond-Riggs Park community. Subsequent investigation also discovered that Perchloroethylene (PERC), a dry cleaner solvent, was present in groundwater at elevated  concentrations, which led to EPA's involvement.

In October 2001, EPA assumed responsibility for the gasoline release investigation and on November 26, 2002, EPA issued a Unilateral Order to Chevron for a site investigation.  

During the summer of 2002, as a result of the Site Investigation, perchlorethylene (PERC) was discovered in the gasoline plume. Since PERC is not a contaminant associated with gasoline, but rather is commonly associated with dry cleaning activities, EPA determined that PERC is not a Facility related contaminant.

On November 26, 2002, the EPA issued an Unilateral Order pursuant to the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Section 7003 "Imminent and Substantial Endangerment to Health or the Environment" to Chevron U.S.A., Inc. (Chevron) for investigation and remedy development for the release of petroleum related constituents from the former Chevron Gasoline Service Station No. 122208, located at 5801 Riggs Road, Chillum, Maryland. The Order was effective on December 11, 2002.

As required by the Order, Chevron collected soil, soil vapor, indoor air and groundwater samples, and has conducted pilot tests to upgrade the existing groundwater remediation system. Between 2001 and 2007, Chevron installed 232 temporary Geoprobe wells, 80 groundwater monitoring wells, 7 product recovery wells, and 4 soil vapor monitoring wells. Cumulatively, during the same period, Chevron has collected over 3000 groundwater samples, 300 soil samples, 250 soil vapor samples from 90 properties, 50 indoor and ambient air samples from 20 properties, and 14 basement sump samples.

Between 2002 and 2005, EPA collected indoor air samples from 32 properties and installed 24 soil vapor wells for its PERC investigation; and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer (ACE), on behalf of EPA, reviewed data from over half the properties sampled by Chevron.

Based on soil, soil vapor, indoor air and groundwater data collected through September 2005, EPA has delineated a shallow benzene plume and a shallow methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plume.

On August 30, 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency announced its proposed remedy for the cleanup of the former Chevron gas station (refer to : "Reports, Documents and Photographs : Corrective Action Statement of Basis").

The April 16, 2008  the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued its final decision describing the remedy for a gasoline release that occurred at a former (refer to:  " Reports, Documents and Photographs :  Corrective Action Final Decision").  

On August 25, 2008, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a proposed Administrative Order on Consent (AOC) entered into between EPA and Chevron U.S.A. Inc. (Chevron) to clean up releases at or from the former Chevron gasoline service station and requested public comments on the AOC. (refer to:  " Reports, Documents and Photographs:  EPA Administrative Order on Consent").   

The Administrative Order on Consent (AOC) to implement the final remedy became effective on January 19, 2009. During the public comment period, EPA received five sets of comments. EPA has responded to those comments and determined that no modifications to the AOC is necessary.

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Site Description

Interactive Map of Former Chevron USA Products Company #122208, Chillum, Maryland


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The Facility is located at the eastern corner of the intersection of Eastern Avenue and Riggs Road in Chillum, Maryland (also known as Hyattsville Maryland).  The north side of the right-of-way of Eastern Avenue delineates the boundary between Prince George’s County, Maryland and the District of Columbia. The southern extent of the Facility property abuts the District.

Gulf Oil Corporation (Gulf) constructed a service station on the Facility property on or about 1954. Standard Oil Company of California merged with Gulf in 1984, and after restructuring, changed its name to Chevron. Chevron owned and operated the Facility until it was sold to an independent owner in 1993.  The Facility is currently a Shell Service Station. 

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Contaminants at this Facility

The contaminant of primary concern were benzene plume and a shallow methyl tertiarybutyl ether (MTBE) plume. Also Perchloroethylene (PERC), a dry cleaner solvent,  was present in groundwater (which did not come from The Facility).

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Institutional and Engineering Controls at this Facility

The facility remedy, as stated in the "Cleanup Status" Section, includes groundwater remediation systems in Maryland and the District of Columbia.  Vapor mitigation systems were installed in homes located above the contaminated groundwater plume with measured vapor levels that exceed EPA’s remediation standards for indoor air.  Chevron submitted a letter dated November 7, 2013 to EPA to formally request a termination review and EPA approval that operation and maintenance of the three VMS units in Washington, D.C. be discontinued, as data suggested that these units were no longer necessary to protect human health. In a letter dated January 9, 2014, the EPA approved Chevron’s request to discontinue operation and maintenance of the three VMS units.

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Land Reuse Information at this Facility

The facility is under continued use.

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Site Responsiblity at this Facility

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action activities at this facility are conducted under the direction of the EPA Region 3 with assistance from Maryland DEP and DIstrict of Columbia DEP.

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