We've made some changes to EPA.gov. If the information you are looking for is not here, you may be able to find it on the EPA Web Archive or the January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot.

EPA in Missouri

Kansas City Smelting and Refining Facility on Guinotte Street, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri - Fact Sheet, August 2017

EPA Conducting Initial Removal Assessment

OVERVIEW OF INITIAL REMOVAL ASSESSMENT

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 is performing the initial phase of a removal (cleanup) assessment to determine if lead from industrial sources potentially poses a threat to human health and the environment by testing soil of the residential properties near the former Kansas City Smelting and Refining (KCS&R) Facility at 2223 Guinotte St. in Kansas City, Mo. EPA is requesting property owner permission to perform sampling (environmental testing) to identify if any residential properties have lead in the soil.

WHY IS EPA TESTING FOR LEAD IN THIS AREA?

Over time, the lead smelter operations at the former KCS&R facility, which operated from around 1890 to 1920, may have deposited lead onto area properties. Lead particles could have become airborne, and may have settled into residential yards. Once lead falls onto soil, it usually sticks to soil particles. In addition, yards could have lead in the soil, if waste was transported from the smelter to homes and other locations for use as construction backfill and/or landscaping material in the form of cinders or other material.

HOW CAN MY PROPERTY BE TESTED FOR LEAD?

EPA is requesting that property owners grant access to the EPA contractor to perform soil testing of residential yards by signing a sampling access agreement. This testing is being conducted at no cost to the property owner.

Once permission is given to sample your property for possible lead contamination, EPA will perform testing and provide the results to you. If your property has unsafe levels of lead, EPA will request the property owner’s permission to cleanup areas that may be contaminated with lead.  A cleanup generally consists of the excavation and removal of lead-contaminated soil, replacing the excavated material with clean topsoil, and restoring a grass lawn.

WHY IS LEAD CONTAMINATION A CONCERN?

Lead is classified by EPA as a probable human carcinogen and is a cumulative toxicant. It is a toxic metal that is harmful if inhaled or swallowed. Lead exposure can pose serious health risks, particularly for young children, pregnant women, and nursing mothers. Children are more sensitive to lead than adults, and can develop lifelong disabilities and problems from lead exposure. It is important that children be tested annually, because lead-poisoned children do not always look or act sick. Talk to your pediatrician, general physician, or local health agency about what you can do and about testing your child. Your doctor can do a simple blood test to check you or your child for lead exposure. Pregnant women and nursing mothers should also avoid exposure to lead to protect their children.

For more information on free blood lead testing for children and adults, please contact:

Kansas City Health Department
2400 Troost Ave., Suite 3400
Kansas City, MO 64108
Phone: 816-513-6048
Or visit their website

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT LEAD

EPA CONTACT INFORMATION

Questions and requests for information about this initial assessment can be directed to:

Joe Davis
On-Scene Coordinator
Superfund Division
EPA Region 7
Phone: 913-551-7909
Toll-free: 1-800-223-0425
 
Yvonne Smith
On-Scene Coordinator
Superfund Division
EPA Region 7
Phone: 913-551-7795
Toll-free: 1-800-223-0425
 
Elizabeth Kramer
Community Engagement Specialist
Enforcement Coordination Office
EPA Region 7
Phone: 913-551-7186
Toll-free: 1-800-223-0425