An official website of the United States government.

We've made some changes to EPA.gov. If the information you are looking for is not here, you may be able to find it on the EPA Web Archive or the January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot.

News Releases

News Releases from Region 01

EPA Reaches Settlement with New Bedford, Mass. Electroplating Company for Hazardous Waste Management Violations

06/14/2019
Contact Information: 
David Deegan (deegan.dave@epa.gov)
(617) 918-1017

NEW BEDFORD – A recent settlement has ensured that a New Bedford, Mass. electroplating company has certified that they have come into compliance with all federal and state hazardous waste laws.

Southcoast Plating, Inc., which operates as Star Plating Company, certified in its settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) New England office that it is now following the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and federal and state hazardous waste management regulations. The company applies metal coatings, including zinc and tin, to hardware. EPA discovered the violations during a September 2017 inspection of the company's facility, and followed up with a notice of potential violation in December 2017, and an administrative complaint in September 2018. Based on the company's limited ability to pay, they have agreed to a penalty of $30,000 to settle the EPA charges of 14 counts of violations of these environmental regulations.

"Following federal and state hazardous waste regulations helps ensure that these materials are properly managed, so workers and other people aren't exposed to potentially harmful substances," said EPA New England Acting Regional Administrator Deborah Szaro. "Carefully following hazardous waste regulations also help prevent releases to the environment."

Star Plating generates metal hydroxide sludge, a hazardous waste, from its wastewater system. The company was charged with, among other things, failing to: properly store hazardous waste, including the accumulation of hazardous waste in a tank or container; properly label containers of hazardous waste; prepare a training plan and do the training; maintain an up-to-date contingency plan; post required signs; provide required emergency equipment and information; and to conduct weekly inspections of hazardous waste storage areas and keep records of these inspections, all of which were required by law. These violations could have resulted in releases of hazardous wastes to the environment.

More information on EPA's Waste, Chemical, and Cleanup Enforcement https://www.epa.gov/enforcement/waste-chemical-and-cleanup-enforcement