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Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP)

Substitutes in Streaming Agents

You will need Adobe Reader to view some of the files on this page. See EPA’s About PDF page to learn more.Substitutes are reviewed on the basis of environmental and health risks, including factors such as ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, toxicity, flammability, and exposure potential. Lists of acceptableHelpacceptableThis designation means that a substitute may be used, without restriction, to replace the relevant ODS within the end-use specified. For example, HCFC-22 is an acceptable substitute for R-502 in industrial process refrigeration. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use. and UnacceptableHelpUnacceptableThis designation means that it is illegal to use a product as a substitute for an ODS in a specific end-use. For example, HCFC-141b is an unacceptable substitute for CFC-11 in building chillers. Note that all SNAP determinations apply to the use of a specific product as a substitute for a specific ODS in a specific end-use. substitutes are updated several times each year. The list of substitutes is shown below.

Note: SNAP-related information published in the Federal Register takes precedence over all information on this page.

Substitute ODPHelpODPA number that refers to the amount of ozone depletion caused by a substance. The ODP is the ratio of the impact on ozone of a chemical compared to the impact of a similar mass of CFC-11. Thus, the ODP of CFC-11 is defined to be 1.0. Other CFCs and HCFCs have ODPs that range from 0.01 to 1.0. The halons have ODPs ranging up to 10. Carbon tetrachloride has an ODP of 1.2, and methyl chloroform's ODP is 0.11. HFCs have zero ODP because they do not contain chlorine. A table of all ozone-depleting substances (http://www.epa.gov/ozone/science/ods/index.html) shows their ODPs, GWPs, and CAS numbers. GWPHelpGWPThe index used to translate the level of emissions of various gases into a common measure in order to compare the relative radiative forcing of different gases without directly calculating the changes in atmospheric concentrations. GWPs are calculated as the ratio of the radiative forcing that would result from the emissions of one kilogram of a greenhouse gas to that from the emission of one kilogram of carbon dioxide over a period of time (usually 100 years). Gases involved in complex atmospheric chemical processes have not been assigned GWPs. See lifetime. SNAP Listing Date Listing Status Further Information
[HCFC Blend] B (Halotron 1) 0.0098 77 March 18, 1994 Acceptable: For non-residential uses only.  
[HCFC Blend] C (NAF P-III) N/A N/A August 26, 1994 Acceptable: For non-residential uses only.  
[HCFC Blend] D (Blitz III) N/A N/A August 26, 1994 Acceptable: For non-residential uses only.  
[HCFC Blend] E (NAF P-IV) 0.02 N/A April 26, 2000 Acceptable with Narrowed Use Limits: For non-residential uses only. As with other streaming agents, EPA recommends that potential risks of combustion byproducts be labeled on the extinguisher (see UL 2129). Discharge testing and training should be strictly limited only to that which is essential to meet safety or performance requirements. The agent should be recovered from the fire protection system in conjunction with testing or servicing, and recycled for later use or destroyed.
[Surfactant Blend] A [Cold Fire, FlameOut, Fire Strike] N/A N/A March 18, 1994 Acceptable  
2-bromo-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (2-BTP) 0.0028 0.23-0.26 December 1, 2016 Acceptable with Use Conditions: For use only in handheld extinguishers in aircraft.  
C6-perfluoroketone [1,1,1,2,2,4,5,5,5-nonafluoro-4-(trifluoromethyl)-3-pentanone] (Novec 1230) 0 6 to 100 January 27, 2003 Acceptable with Narrowed Use Limits: For non-residential uses only. For operations that fill canisters to be used in streaming applications, EPA recommends the following:

- install and use adequate ventilation ;
- clean up all spills immediately in accordance with good industrial hygiene practices; and
- provide training for safe handling procedures to all employees that would be likely to handle containers of the agent or extinguishing units filled with the agent.

Discharge testing and training should be strictly limited only to that which is essential to meet safety or performance requirements. The agent should be recovered from the fire protection system in conjunction with testing or servicing, and recycled for later use or destroyed. As with other streaming agents, EPA recommends that potential risks of combustion by-products be labeled on the extinguisher (see UL 2129). EPA has no intention of duplicating or displacing OSHA coverage related to the use of personal protective equipment (e.g., respiratory protection), fire protection, hazard communication, worker training or any other occupational safety and health standard with respect to halon substitutes. 
C6F14 (PFC-614, CEA-614) 0 9,300 April 28, 1999 Acceptable with Narrowed Use Limits: For non-residential uses where other alternatives are not technically feasible due to performance or safety requirements: a. because of their physical or chemical properties, or b. where human exposure to the extinguishing agents may result in failure to meet applicable narrowed use limits. Users should observe the limitations on PFC acceptability by making reasonable effort to undertake the following measures:

- conduct an evaluation of foreseeable conditions of end use;
- determine that the physical or chemical properties or other technical constraints of the other available agents preclude their use; and
- determine that human exposure to the other alternative extinguishing agents may result in failure to meet applicable narrowed use limits; Documentation of such measures should be available for review upon request.

The principal environmental characteristic of concern for PFCs is that they have high GWPs and long atmospheric lifetimes. Actual contributions to global warming depend upon the quantities of PFCs emitted. For additional guidance regarding applications in which PFCs may be appropriate, users should consult the description of potential uses which is included in the March 18, 1994, Final Rule (59 FR 13044). Discharge testing and training should be strictly limited only to that which is essential to meet safety or performance requirements. The agent should be recovered from the fire protection system in conjunction with testing or servicing, and recycled for later use or destroyed.
C7 Fluoroketone 0 1 September 19, 2012 Acceptable with Narrowed Use Limits: For non-residential uses only. Use of this agent should be in accordance with the latest edition of NFPA Standard 10 for Portable Fire Extinguishers.

For operations that fill canisters to be used in streaming applications, EPA recommends the following:

–Adequate ventilation should be in place;
–All spills should be cleaned up immediately in accordance with good industrial hygiene practices; and
–Training for safe handling procedures should be provided to all employees that would be likely to handle containers of the agent or extinguishing units filled with the agent.

This substitute is a blend of 3-pentanone,1,1,1,2,4,5,5,5-octafluoro-2,4-bis(trifluoromethyl) (Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number [CAS Reg. No.] 813-44-5) and 3-hexanone,1,1,1,2,4,4,5,5,6,6,6-undecafluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl) (CAS Reg. No. 813-45-6).   See additional comments 1,2,3,4.
Carbon Dioxide 0 1 March 18, 1994 Acceptable  
CF3I 0.008 0.4 May 22, 1996 Acceptable with Narrowed Use Limits: For non-residential uses only.  
CFC-11 1 4,750   Unacceptable This agent has been suggested for use on large outdoor fires for which non-ozone depleting alternatives are currently available. In addition, CAA section 610 bans the use of CFCs in portable extinguishers.
Dry Chemical 0 0 March 18, 1994 Acceptable  
Firebane® 1115 0 0 October 4, 2011 Acceptable Follow the manufacturer’s guidelines in the MSDS. EPA recommends that use of these systems be in accordance with the latest edition of NFPA 10 Standard for Portable Extinguishers.
Firebane® 1170 0 0 October 4, 2011 Acceptable Follow the manufacturer’s guidelines in the MSDS. EPA recommends that use of these systems be in accordance with the latest edition of NFPA 10 Standard for Portable Extinguishers.
Firebane® 1179 0 0 October 4, 2011 Acceptable Follow the manufacturer’s guidelines in the MSDS. EPA recommends that use of these systems be in accordance with the latest edition of NFPA 10 Standard for Portable Extinguishers.
Firebane® All-Weather 1115 0 0 October 4, 2011 Acceptable Follow the manufacturer’s guidelines in the MSDS. EPA recommends that use of these systems be in accordance with the latest edition of NFPA 10 Standard for Portable Extinguishers.
Foam N/A N/A March 18, 1994 Acceptable  
Gelled Halocarbon / Dry Chemical Suspension N/A N/A August 26, 1994 Acceptable Allowable in the residential use market.
H Galden HFPEs 0 2,790 - 6,230 January 27, 2003 Acceptable with Narrowed Use Limits: For non-residential uses only. For operations that fill canisters to be used in streaming applications, EPA recommends the following:

- install and use adequate ventilation ;
- clean up all spills immediately in accordance with good industrial hygiene practices; and
- provide training for safe handling procedures to all employees that would be likely to handle containers of the agent or extinguishing units filled with the agent.

Discharge testing and training should be strictly limited only to that which is essential to meet safety or performance requirements. The agent should be recovered from the fire protection system in conjunction with testing or servicing, and recycled for later use or destroyed. As with other streaming agents, EPA recommends that potential risks of combustion by-products be labeled on the extinguisher (see UL 2129). EPA has no intention of duplicating or displacing OSHA coverage related to the use of personal protective equipment (e.g., respiratory protection), fire protection, hazard communication, worker training or any other occupational safety and health standard with respect to halon substitutes. 
HCFC-123 (FE-232) 0.02 77 March 18, 1994 Acceptable: For non-residential uses only.  
HCFC-124 (FE-241) 0.022 609 August 26, 1994 Acceptable: For non-residential uses only.  
HFC-227ea (FM 200) 0 3,220 April 28, 1999 Acceptable with Narrowed Use Limits: For non-residential uses only. Discharge testing and training should be strictly limited only to that which is essential to meet safety or performance requirements. The agent should be recovered from the fire protection system in conjunction with testing or servicing, and recycled for later use or destroyed.
HFC-236fa (FE-36) 0 9,810 April 28, 1999 Acceptable with Narrowed Use Limits: Acceptable in non-residential uses when manufactured using any process that does not convert perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) directly to HFC-236fa in a single step. Discharge testing and training should be strictly limited only to that which is essential to meet safety or performance requirements.

The agent should be recovered from the fire protection system in conjunction with testing or servicing, and recycled for later use or destroyed.

Acceptable for local application systems inside textile process machinery.
Water 0 0 March 18, 1994 Acceptable  
Water Mist Systems using Potable or Natural Sea Water 0 0 July 28, 1995 Acceptable  

Additional Comments

  1. Discharge testing and training should be strictly limited only to that which is essential to meet safety or performance requirements.
  2. The agent should be recovered from the fire protection system in conjunction with testing or servicing, and recycled for later use or destroyed.
  3. As with other streaming agents, EPA recommends that potential risks of combustion by-products be labeled on the extinguisher (see UL 2129)
  4. EPA has no intention of duplicating or displacing OSHA coverage related to the use of personal protective equipment (e.g., respiratory protection), fire protection, hazard communication, worker training or any other occupational safety and health standard with respect to halon substitutes