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Assessing and Managing Chemicals under TSCA

Fact Sheet: Di-n-pentyl phthalate (DnPP)

Q1. What is DnPP?

Di-n-pentyl phthalate (DnPP), is one of a group of chemical substances collectively known as phthalates. Phthalates are used in many industrial and consumer products, primarily as an additive in polyvinylchloride (PVC) products to make them flexible and resilient. DnPP is no longer in use.

Q2. What action is EPA taking?

EPA is issuing a Significant New Use Rule, also known as a SNUR, under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). This SNUR requires manufacturers (including importers) and processors of DnPP to notify EPA at least 90 days before starting or resuming new uses of this chemical, excluding use as a chemical standard for analytical experiments. This notification allows EPA the opportunity to evaluate the intended use and, if necessary, prohibit or limit that activity.

Q3. Why is EPA issuing a SNUR for DnPP?

DnPP has been shown to cause developmental and/or reproductive effects in laboratory animals. This SNUR will provide the opportunity for EPA to review and control, as appropriate, before any use of DnPP could resume.

Q4. Why is EPA concerned about DnPP?

DnPP has been shown to cause developmental and/or reproductive effects in laboratory animals. Phthalates are used in many industrial and consumer products, many of which pose potentially high exposure risks to consumers, workers and children. Additionally, phthalates have been detected in food and humans.

Q5. What other action is EPA taking to evaluate the potential risks of phthalates?

Several other phthalates are being assessed as part of the TSCA Work Plan for Chemical Assessments.