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Building the Capacity of Drinking Water Systems

Water Efficiency and Conservation Resources for Small Drinking Water Systems

Water efficiency is becoming increasingly important to public water systems in the United States from a resource management and economic perspective. The documents below explain water efficiency at public water systems and describe water audits and water loss controls to control and mitigate drinking water losses in distribution systems.

Water Audits and Water Loss Control For Public Water Systems: This document provides an introduction to water loss control and information on the use of water audits in identifying and controlling water losses in public water systems.

Water Efficiency For Public Water Systems: This document introduces water efficiency for public water systems, identifies measures to improve water efficiency, and provides recommendations on how water systems can get started and continue making water efficiency improvements. This document is intended for small and medium‐sized water systems as well as technical assistance providers and state programs that support or regulate these systems.

Water Availability and Variability Strategies For Public Water Systems: This document covers water availability and variability issues faced by public water systems, the potential consequences of climate change on water availability and variability, and the steps that water systems can take to address these uncertainties. This document is intended for small and medium‐sized public water systems as well as technical assistance providers and state programs that support or regulate these systems.

Control and Mitigation of Drinking Water Losses in Distribution Systems: This guidance has been prepared for water management administrators, local government officials, system operators, and others who have an interest in developing programs to reduce losses from their drinking water distribution systems. The success of a water loss control program depends on the ability to tailor the program to the individual PWS. This guidance provides information on flexible tools and techniques that may help the PWS meet their water loss prevention needs.