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Assessing and Managing Chemicals under TSCA

Fact Sheet: Alkanes, C12-13, chloro (CAS No. 71011-12-6)

Q1. What are alkanes, C12-13, chloro (CAS No. 71011-12-6)?

Alkanes, C12-13, chloro are part of a group of chemicals known as short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs). SCCPs are used in a variety of industrial applications, primarily as lubricants and coolants in metal cutting and metal forming operations. SCCPs are no longer in use.

Q2. What action is EPA taking?

EPA is issuing a Significant New Use Rule, also known as a SNUR, under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). This SNUR requires manufacturers (including importers) and processors of Alkanes, C12-13, chloro to notify EPA at least 90 days before starting or resuming new uses of this chemical. This notification allows EPA the opportunity to evaluate the intended use and, if necessary, take prohibit or limit that activity.

Q3. Why is EPA finalizing a SNUR for alkanes, C12-13, chloro (CAS No. 71011-12-6)?

SCCPs have been shown to be toxic to ecosystems. SCCPs have been found in a variety of environmental sources including air, sediment, surface waters, and wastewater. SCCPs have also been measured in a variety of aquatic animals, including freshwater aquatic species, marine mammals, and avian and terrestrial wildlife.

EPA believes that any new uses of SCCPs could cause these chemicals to be released in to the environment and increase potential exposure. Such an increase should not occur without opportunity for EPA to review and control as appropriate.

Q4. Why is EPA concerned about SCCPs?

SCCPs are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic to aquatic organisms at low concentrations. They can remain in the environment for a significant amount of time and can bioaccumulate in animal tissues, increasing the probability and duration of exposure. Even relatively small releases of these chemicals from individual manufacturing, processing, or waste management facilities have the potential to accumulate over time to higher levels and cause significant adverse impacts on the environment.

SCCPs have been measured in a variety of environmental media including air, sediment, surface waters, and wastewater. SCCPs have also been measured in a variety of biota, including freshwater aquatic species, marine mammals, and avian and terrestrial wildlife.

Q5. What other action is EPA taking on SCPPs?

EPA has taken previous action on other SCCPs; for example, in 2012 EPA took an enforcement action requiring the manufacturers of the SCCPs in commerce to cease manufacturing them and pay a $1.4 million fine. In addition, SCCPs have been proposed for addition to the Stockholm Convention for Persistent Organic Pollutants.