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Estimating Environmental Compliance Costs for Industry (1981)

Paper Number: EE-0080

Document Date: 01/01/1981

Author(s):  Kopp, Raymond J., Portney, Paul R

Subject Area(s):

Economic Analysis, Pollution Control Costs, Engineering Costs, Econometric Models, Retrospective Cost Survey

Keywords:  Economic Analysis, Pollution Control Costs, Engineering Costs, Econometric Models, Retrospective Cost Survey

Abstract: 

This paper discusses the estimation of the costs incurred by the private sector in complying with federal environmental regulation. The purpose of the paper is to discuss the pros and cons of existing approaches to compliance cost estimation such as ex post survey estimation and ex ante estimation techniques (input cost accounting methods, engineering process models and, econometric models). The paper outlines new and more comprehensive methodologies (such as combining these techniques) and discusses potential problems associated with using these approaches in practice.  Paper was also submitted to the National Science Foundation, Directorate for Scientific, Technological, and International Affairs, Division of Policy Research and Analysis.

This paper is part of the  Environmental Economics Research Inventory.

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  • Estimating Environmental Compliance Costs for Industry (PDF)(65 pp, 9 MB, 01/01/1981, EE-0080)
    The purpose of the paper is to discuss the pros and cons of existing approaches to compliance cost estimation such as ex post survey estimation and ex ante estimation techniques (input cost accounting methods, engineering process models and, econometric models). The paper outlines new and more comprehensive methodologies (such as combining these techniques) and discusses potential problems associated with using these approaches in practice.