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Hudson River PCBs Superfund Site

Get Involved

On this page:


How to Get Involved and Stay Informed

Attend a project meeting. Periodic meetings are held by EPA and/or GE to update the local community about ongoing work. Check back for scheduled meetings, or sign up for our Hudson River PCBs Site email Listserv to stay informed and receive the latest news and updates.

The Hudson River PCBs Site Community Advisory Group (CAG) also meets several times a year at various locations in the Upper Hudson River project area. CAG meetings are open to the public and are an opportunity to learn more about different aspects of the cleanup.

Talk to EPA staff. The Hudson River Office is open Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Hudson River Office staff are available to answer your questions, receive feedback, and provide information about ongoing work. Stop in, send an email to epahrfo@outlook.com, or call (518) 407-0400. 


Educational Resources

General EPA Resources for Teachers and Students

EPA Environmental Education 
EPA for Students and Educators 
Water Education and Training Resources 
WaterSense

From the New York State Department of Health
Hudson River Creatures Activity Book: A 20-page activity and coloring book from the NYS Department of Health.

From the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Hudson River Estuary Program: DEC’s Hudson River Estuary Program and Hudson River Research Reserve have many resources to offer classroom teachers and non-formal educators who study the river. 
Project WET (Water Education for Teachers)

From the CARY Institute for Ecosystem Studies
Changing Hudson Project


Learn About Health Advisories on Eating Hudson River Fish

Fishing New York’s abundant waters is a popular sport. Anglers catch a wide variety of fish and many eat the fish they catch. However, some species in certain waters contain chemicals that may be harmful to your health, even when the fish look healthy and the water looks clean. What should you consider when deciding whether or not to eat the fish you catch? The New York State Department of Health issues health advisories for people who eat fish from waters where chemical contamination may be a concern. You can make an informed decision about the potential risks from eating contaminated sport fish by using their publications. The New York State Department of Health has also initiated the Hudson River Fish Advisory Outreach Project to educate anglers about New York State fish advisories. For more information or to ask questions about advisories in your area, call the Department of Health toll-free at 1-800-458-1158 or send an email to BTSA@health.state.ny.us.

EPA: Advisories and Technical Resources for Fish and Shellfish Consumption

State, tribal, and local governments protect people from possible risks of eating contaminated fish by monitoring their waters and issuing fish advisories when contaminant levels are unsafe.