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Superfund Sites in Reuse in Arizona

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Apache Powder Co. Alternative Energy Reuse Capped Site Reuse Green Remediation Reuse

Apache Powder Co.Apache Powder Co.The Apache Powder Co. Superfund site is located in Cochise County, Arizona. It covers about 9 square miles, including 1,200 acres of land owned by Apache Nitrogen Products (ANPI), formerly the Apache Powder Company. ANPI began making industrial chemicals and explosives on site in 1922. ANPI now makes chemical products used by agricultural and mining customers. ANPI previously disposed of solid and liquid wastes on its property. In the late 1980s, metals and explosive wastes were detected in some on-site soils and unlined evaporation ponds. Nitrate and perchlorate were also detected in groundwater on and off site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. In 1997, ANPI constructed a wetlands treatment system to biodegrade nitrate on the northern part of the site. EPA’s cleanup plan also included off-site disposal and on-site capping of contaminated soils. The constructed wetlands along the San Pedro River serve as habitat for area wildlife. Following a renewable energy feasibility analysis by EPA in 2008, ANPI installed a 41-kilowatt solar canopy on site in 2010. The canopy offsets about 45 percent of ANPI’s annual office energy use, providing $6,000 in cost savings each year. ANPI also uses solar energy to power ongoing groundwater cleanup and monitoring efforts.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 77 people and generated an estimated $96,407,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Indian Bend Wash Area Cultural/Historical Reuse

The Indian Bend Wash Area Superfund site is located in Scottsdale and Tempe, Arizona. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in December 1982, after discovery of contaminants in groundwater at several public water supply wells. In 1987, EPA divided the site into two areas. The first area – North Indian Bend Wash (NIBW) – is a 10-mile long groundwater plume north of the Salt River in Scottsdale and the South Indian Bend Wash (SIBW) an approximately 3-square-mile groundwater plume south of the Salt River in Tempe. Land use in both the NIBW and SIBW area is a mix of residential, industrial, commercial and recreational uses and waterways. Cleanup in the NIBW area addressed soil contamination with soil vapor extraction. Five groundwater pump-and-treat systems continue to operate as part of ongoing cleanup efforts, which are estimated to take 70 years to meet cleanup goals. At the SIBW area, cleanup addressed soil contamination with soil vapor extraction. EPA approved monitoring of the natural breakdown of groundwater contamination at the three distinct groundwater plumes that constitute the site. A pilot test of in situ chemical oxidation has assisted in attaining remedial goals for monitored natural attenuation at SIBW. EPA is reviewing contaminant source areas for potential vapor intrusion risk. Vapor intrusion exposure was not a known concern when the remedies for NIBW and SIBW were selected in the early 1990s. Continued use at the site includes residential, commercial and industrial uses. 
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 84 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,698 people and generated an estimated $329,003,950 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Motorola, Inc. (52nd Street Plant)

Honeywell OfficesMotorola, Inc. (52nd Street Plant)The Motorola, Inc. (52nd Street Plant) Superfund site is located in Phoenix, Arizona. EPA defines the site generally by the extent of impacted groundwater that underlies a 7-mile stretch spanning from downtown Phoenix to just east of Sky Harbor Airport. Land uses in the area include a mix of residential, commercial and industrial uses. The former Motorola 52nd Street Plant, a 90-acre former semiconductor manufacturing plant, is part of the site. The Honeywell International facility, a 118-acre aerospace manufacturing plant, is also part of the site. In 1982, Motorola discovered an underground storage tank leaking at its plant. Further studies identified soil and groundwater contaminated with several solvents used by Motorola when it made semiconductors. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Motorola (now Freescale Semiconductor) began operating one groundwater treatment system in 1992. Motorola and Honeywell International began operating another groundwater treatment system in 2001. Motorola also treated contaminated soil in 1996 and 1997. Since 2011, EPA and Freescale have studied potential movement of groundwater vapors into homes, acted to prevent vapors from entering 19 residences, and completed protective action at a commercial building in 2017. EPA, the State and the site’s potentially responsible parties are also evaluating other potential sources of contamination. All land uses in the area will be able to remain in continued use during cleanup.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 17 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,134 people and generated an estimated $267,892,599 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Phoenix-Goodyear Airport Area Capped Site Reuse

Lockheed Martin office on sitePhoenix-Goodyear Airport AreaThe Phoenix-Goodyear Airport (PGA) Area Superfund site is located in Maricopa County, Arizona about 17 miles west of downtown Phoenix. The site includes two areas – PGA-North and PGA-South. PGA-North is the location of the former Unidynamics facility. This part of the site includes three unused parcels owned by the Crane Company. The City of Goodyear zoned the parcels for commercial and industrial use. PGA-South includes the Phoenix-Goodyear Airport and adjacent commercial and industrial properties, which are owned by JRC Goodyear. PGA-South is the site of the former Litchfield Naval Air Facility. In 1981, the state identified contaminated groundwater and soil near the airport. Maintaining and operating military aircraft at the former Naval Air Facility and researching and manufacturing military detonators and explosives at the Unidynamics facility led to contamination. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup includes treating groundwater, extracting soil vapor, and removing and capping contaminated soil. Cleanup is ongoing. A manufacturer of prefabricated homes is located next to the airport. More recent airport tenants include two airline flight schools and an aircraft maintenance company. The Phoenix-Goodyear Airport contributes an estimated $200 million a year to the local economy.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 34 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 949 people and generated an estimated $112,404,117 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Tucson International Airport Area Core Infrastructure Reuse

Solar panels in the TIAA parking lotTucson International Airport AreaThe 10-square-mile Tucson International Airport Area Superfund site is located in Tucson, Arizona. The site includes Tucson International Airport, portions of the Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation, residential areas in Tucson and South Tucson, and the Air Force Plant #44 Raytheon Missile Systems Company (AFP44). At least 20 facilities have operated on site since 1942, including aircraft and electronics facilities, a fire-drill training facility, and unlined landfills. Industrial use and disposal of wastes began in the 1940s. Because of widespread groundwater and soil contamination, EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup includes ongoing groundwater treatment at AFP44 and the airport. Soil treatment is also ongoing. Treated water is returned to the municipal water supply for use as drinking water. Tucson International Airport remains operational. Today, ongoing industrial activities at the site include machining, surface preparation, surface coating, metal plating and missile parts assembly. At least 124 businesses operate on site, generating over $458 million in annual sales. The businesses employ nearly 4,200 people. The Federal Aviation Administration awarded the Tucson Airport Authority a $5.7 million grant for a solar panel installation covering the entire parking area. The solar panels generate about two million kilowatt-hours of energy per year. The design also includes “green walls” vegetated with plants that provide cool climate conditions under the solar panel installation.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 92 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 4,148 people and generated an estimated $998,939,104 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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