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Superfund Sites in Reuse in Indiana

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American Chemical Service, Inc. Capped Site Reuse

Restored wetlands at the siteAmerican Chemical Service, Inc.The 23-acre American Chemical Service, Inc. Superfund site is located in Griffith, Indiana. A solvent recovery firm, a chemical manufacturer and a chemical drum reconditioning business operated on site. Improper waste disposal practices contaminated groundwater, surface water and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included treatment of groundwater and contaminated soil and sediment as well as removal of chemical drums and debris. Long-term groundwater and well monitoring are ongoing. American Chemical Service continues to make specialty chemicals at its facility on site.

As of December 2016, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 5 people and generated an estimated $10,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Columbus Old Municipal Landfill #1 Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 19-acre Columbus Old Municipal Landfill #1 (OCL) Superfund site is located in Columbus, Indiana. From 1938 to 1966, the City of Columbus operated an unpermitted municipal landfill on site. The unlined landfill accepted household wastes as well as materials from some industrial sources. Waste disposal resulted in contamination of soil, sediments and groundwater. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The City of Columbus planned to relocate part of State Highway 46 into downtown Columbus. The City’s plan included a road across the landfill and a new bridge across the East Fork of the White River next to the site. EPA’s cleanup plan made sure that the construction would not impact the site’s remedy. Cleanup included installation of fencing with warning signs, landfill cover inspections and maintenance, installation of additional monitoring wells and groundwater monitoring, and land and water use restrictions. The site’s potentially responsible parties led the cleanup with oversight from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management. The City of Columbus completed the road and bridge project in 1999.

As of December 2016, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Conrail Rail Yard (Elkhart)

The Conrail Rail Yard (Elkhart) Superfund site covers 2,500 acres in Elkhart, Indiana. It includes a rail yard, a drag car racing strip and other areas impacted by contamination. Operations at the 675-acre rail yard area began in 1956. Rail yard operations transferred to Conrail in 1976 and to Norfolk Corporation in 1999. Norfolk Southern Corporation continues to operate the rail yard, which serves as a classification distribution yard for freight cars. Rail car repair, engine cleaning and diesel refueling facilities are also located at the yard. The Osceola Dragway, a commercial drag car racing facility, also continues to operate on site. Past activities and solvent spills at the rail yard and drag strip resulted in contaminated groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities include providing affected residents with an alternate drinking water source, containing and monitoring contaminated groundwater, and sampling for chemical vapors in residences. Where sampling identifies chemical vapors in homes, Conrail installs basement venting units. The remedy also includes a groundwater extraction system at the rail yard and groundwater recirculation and treatment at the drag strip. Injection of substances to break down solvent contaminants in groundwater is also planned at the drag strip.

As of December 2016, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 79 people and generated an estimated $7,160,137 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Continental Steel Corp. Alternative Energy Reuse Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse Green Remediation Reuse

Continental Steel Corp.Continental Steel Corp.The 183-acre Continental Steel Corp. Superfund site is located in Kokomo, Indiana. From 1914 to 1986, a steel manufacturing facility operated on site. Facility operations resulted in soil, sediment, surface water and groundwater contamination. In 1986, Continental Steel filed for bankruptcy. In 1989, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). During cleanup, EPA and the State worked with the community and local developers to support the return of parts of the site to productive use. A local florist reused an on-site warehouse. A construction company purchased part of the site property for equipment storage. Part of the cleanup effort enabled a project that reused an on-site quarry as a stormwater retention/detention basin. The City of Kokomo worked with Howard County to obtain fill material from an area with poor drainage, saving the localities thousands of dollars. Three on-site wind turbines produce enough energy to offset at least half of the energy needed for ongoing groundwater treatment. Other reuse efforts at the site are ongoing. The first phase of construction for the community’s Wildcat Creek Soccer Complex has been completed; the first soccer game was played in October 2015. Future plans for the complex include additional sports fields, other recreation facilities, parking lots and a walking path. A 7-megawatt solar park has also been built on site. The solar park provides power for up to 1,000 homes.

As of December 2016, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 55 people and generated an estimated $1,859,890 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Galen Myers Dump/Drum Salvage

A single family residence located on siteGalen Myers Dump/Drum SalvageThe 5-acre Galen Myers Dump/Drum Salvage Superfund site is located in St. Joseph County, Indiana. From 1970 to 1983, the dump accepted 55-gallon steel drums. Dump operators emptied the collected drums by spilling the contents on the ground and later resold the drums as trash containers. Working with the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM), EPA determined that dumping had contaminated surface soils and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA and IDEM removed drums, flammable materials and contaminated soils. The agencies also provided alternate water supplies to about 180 homes affected by the contamination. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. In August 2005, an individual purchased the site property and constructed a single-family home and two unattached sheds to store equipment for their landscaping business, which operates from the former dump site.

As of December 2016, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Jacobsville Neighborhood Soil Contamination

Brand new ECHO veteran Housing reuse on the Jacobsville Superfund siteJacobsville Neighborhood Soil ContaminationThe 4.5-square-mile Jacobsville Neighborhood Soil Contamination Superfund site is located in Evansville, Indiana. The site includes commercial businesses, manufacturing facilities, hospitals, schools and residences. Several manufacturing companies operated at the site beginning in the 1880s. Windborne particulates from manufacturing operations resulted in widespread contamination in the community. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2004. Cleanup activities include removal of contaminated soil and backfilling of these areas with clean soil. Cleanup also include restoration of residential properties. As of April 2017, workers had sampled about 3,800 properties, collected about 30,000 soil samples and cleaned up almost 2,000 residential yards. When the multi-year cleanup started in 2010, EPA’s remediation of two vacant lots in the Jacobsville neighborhood enabled a local nonprofit, the ECHO Housing Corporation, to construct a 26-unit residential building for homeless and disabled military veterans. The nonprofit began the project in 2010 and finished it in mid-2011. Residents moved into the building in November 2011. EPA is currently working with ECHO Housing Corporation on another residential development for Indiana veterans. EPA is also working with several nonprofits and developers to enable them to move forward with other housing options in Evansville. After EPA cleaned up a park in the Jacobsville neighborhood, a local Eagle Scout added landscaping and playground equipment. EPA is also supporting community gardening projects. The cleanup effort has not displaced any residents.

As of December 2016, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Main Street Well Field Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 48-acre Main Street Well Field Superfund site in Elkhart, Indiana, includes a 15-well municipal well field. The site is the largest of three well fields owned by the City of Elkhart and supplies the majority of drinking water for city residents. In 1983, EPA identified groundwater contamination likely from nearby industrial operations. The same year, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) installed a groundwater extraction system, an air stripper system and a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system. The SVE system achieved cleanup goals in 2000. In 2001, the City added biking, jogging and walking trails to the site for community use. The City later enhanced the western portion of the site by constructing the Wellfield Botanic Gardens and adding flower gardens, fish ponds and artwork to the area. This environmental project established a buffer zone between land and water using native plants and provides habitat for ducks, geese, birds and other wildlife. In 2006, several site PRPs declared bankruptcy. The City of Elkhart and the West Side PRP group continue to monitor groundwater to ensure the continued delivery of safe drinking water to local residents.

As of December 2016, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. EPA did not have further economic details related to these businesses. For additional information click here.

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Neal's Dump (Spencer)

The 1-acre Neal's Dump (Spencer) Superfund site is located near Spencer, Indiana. A disposal area for industrial wastes operated on site from 1966 to 1971. Items disposed of at the site include electrical capacitors, capacitor parts, contaminated rags and sawdust. Disposal activities resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) completed cleanup activities to residential standards under EPA’s oversight. Cleanup activities included the removal of contaminated materials and capacitors and disposal of these materials at an off-site facility. The PRP backfilled and reseeded the excavated areas. In 1999, EPA took the site off the NPL. The PRP completed cleanup activities at the site in 2003. Part of the site includes a residential backyard, which remains in continued use.

As of December 2016, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Poer Farm

The 5-acre Poer Farm Superfund site is located in a rural area about 3 miles north of Wilkinson, Indiana. From 1973 until 1983, site owners stored drums of solvents and paint resins at the site. Leaking drums resulted in soil contamination. EPA removed all waste and soil from the drum storage areas on site. EPA disposed of contaminated materials at off-site facilities. EPA finalized the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Because EPA had removed contamination, no further cleanup was necessary and EPA took the site off the NPL in 1991. Part of the site is now in agricultural reuse, producing hay for livestock.

As of December 2016, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Prestolite Battery Division

Lowe's hardware storePrestolite Battery DivisionThe 18-acre Prestolite Battery Division Superfund site is located in Knox County, Indiana. A battery manufacturing facility operated on site from 1945 to 1985. Site operators disposed of lead-contaminated sludge and wastewater in a sewer system. Improper waste handling practices and spills contaminated air, soil and surface water. The sewer system leaked wastewater, which contaminated groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup workers removed soil and monitored groundwater. In 1996, EPA entered into a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) with a local real estate developer. The PPA resulted in commercial redevelopment at the site. Available infrastructure next to the site and the site’s location along a high-traffic roadway also encouraged reuse. Businesses began to open in 2001. Today, businesses at the site include a home improvement center, restaurants and a hotel.

As of December 2016, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 199 people and generated an estimated $23,756,830 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Reilly Tar & Chemical Corp. (Indianapolis Plant) Alternative Energy Reuse Capped Site Reuse

On-site solar development in November 2013Reilly Tar & Chemical Corp. (Indianapolis Plant)The 120-acre Reilly Tar & Chemical Corp. (Indianapolis Plant) Superfund site is located in Indianapolis, Indiana. A specialty chemicals production facility has operated on site since the early 1950s. Until 1972, a coal-tar refining and wood treatment facility that used creosote also operated at the site. Operators used a trench, a landfill and several pits on site to dispose of wastes. A lime pond received boiler cooling water. Waste handling practices resulted in groundwater and soil contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup involved extracting and containing groundwater. EPA’s cleanup plan also included a permeable cover for the wood treatment and storage area and removal or treatment of contaminated soil. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. Chemical production operations continue at the site. Developer Hanwha Q CELLS constructed a 10.8-megawatt solar energy generation facility on the southern 43-acres of the site. The Maywood Solar Farm is the first utility-scale solar farm on a Superfund site in the nation The facility began operating in February 2014.

As of December 2016, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 126 people and generated an estimated $60,073,900 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Southside Sanitary Landfill Alternative Energy Reuse Athletic Fields Reuse Green Remediation Reuse

Entrance sign for the 9-hole Buffer Park Golf CourseSouthside Sanitary LandfillThe 324-acre Southside Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located in Indianapolis, Indiana. Once considered a hazard to human health and the environment, the site now provides alternative energy production and green space for the community, in addition to a safely operating landfill. Landfill operations began at the site in 1971. In 1984, sampling identified groundwater contamination from site activities. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup included landfill liquid collection and treatment and groundwater monitoring. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1997. Crossroads Greenhouses, one of the largest methane-powered greenhouses in the United States, has captured more the 2.2 million cubic feet of methane gas each day from the site since 1998. Decomposing waste at the site provides all of the energy used in the 6.5-acre greenhouse. Landfill gas recovery wells and an intricate pipeline system collect and transport methane gas from the site to the neighboring greenhouse. In addition, the Rolls Royce Allison Aircraft Engine Plant began obtaining methane gas from the site’s landfill in 1998. Because methane burns much more cleanly than other fuels, the use of this energy source has reduced the plant’s nitrogen oxide emissions. In 1999, a nine-hole golf course opened on site. In 2003, the landfill donated land for use by the Indianapolis School Board for environmental education. Local schoolchildren tour the site as part of their curriculum on landfill science.

As of December 2016, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 25 people and generated an estimated $3,375,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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U.S. Smelter and Lead Refinery, Inc.

The 79-acre U.S. Smelter and Lead Refinery, Inc. (USS Lead) Superfund site is located in East Chicago, Indiana. A copper smelter and a lead refinery and smelter operated on site from 1906 to 1985. A pesticide manufacturer also operated nearby. These operations resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater with lead and arsenic. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2009. The site is divided into two areas – a residential area and the USS Lead facility property plus site groundwater. The residential area is divided into three zones. Zone 1 is a part of a neighborhood that includes Carrie Gosch Elementary School and a public housing complex operated by the East Chicago Housing Authority. Zones 2 and 3 are primarily single-family homes. In 2012, EPA selected a cleanup remedy for the residential area. It includes excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil. Short-term remedies addressing soil contamination include temporary protective barriers and warning signs. EPA conducted in-home cleaning at the housing complex in Zone 1 in 2016. After residents are relocated, the housing complex will be demolished in 2017. EPA initiated soil cleanups and in-home cleanings in Zone 2 and Zone 3 in 2016; those efforts are ongoing. Residential and public service uses at the site are ongoing.

As of December 2016, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Waste, Inc., Landfill

The 32-acre Waste, Inc., Landfill Superfund site is located on a former wetland area in Michigan City, Indiana. From 1966 to 1982, the site accepted industrial wastes. Site practices resulted in contamination in soil, groundwater and sediment of Trail Creek, which borders the landfill and eventually discharges into Lake Michigan. In 1987, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included abandonment of a well, removal and disposal of an underground fuel storage tank, and placement of fish advisory signs along Trail Creek. The cleanup plan also required consolidating waste, lining an active sewer line and installing a landfill liquid collection system. In 1997, the potentially responsible parties (PRPs) constructed a landfill cap and a gas collection system at the site. Following cleanup, landfill gas, surface water and groundwater monitoring are ongoing. Michigan City currently owns the site property. The City has completed a recreation reuse plan for the site as part of a larger master planning process for the Trail Creek Corridor. Plans are ongoing to open the site by using the existing site access roads for recreational uses such as running and biking.

As of December 2016, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Whiteford Sales & Service Inc./Nationalease Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 11-acre Whiteford Sales and Service, Inc./Nationalease Superfund site is located in South Bend, Indiana. From 1967 to 1983, a truck washing and degreasing facility operated on site. During these years, wastewater discharged into three dry wells on site, resulting in contamination of soil and groundwater. In 1980, St. Joseph County purchased the site property for use in the planned realignment of an adjacent street and construction of an overpass. In 1983, the County used soil from the site for the new overpass. Engineers soon discovered the three dry wells and contaminated soil. The potentially responsible party (PRP) removed and properly disposed of the sludge and surrounding contaminated soil from the wells. In 1990, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA determined that all contamination had been removed and took the site off the NPL in September 1996. Today, the property serves as a stormwater retention basin.

As of December 2016, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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