An official website of the United States government.

We've made some changes to EPA.gov. If the information you are looking for is not here, you may be able to find it on the EPA Web Archive or the January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot.

Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Iowa

If you are having trouble viewing the map in your browser, click the 'View larger map' link below


Aidex Corp.

The 15-acre Aidex Corporation Superfund site is located in rural Mineola, Iowa, about 7 miles south-southeast of Council Bluffs. Aidex Corporation operated a pesticide manufacturing plant on site from 1974 to 1980. Spills of pesticides during transfer of the materials from tank cars to formulation equipment and the improper handling, storage and disposal of process wastes resulted in the release of at least 16 pesticide compounds into the environment. Site operators stored liquid process wastes in an underground storage tank that leaked. In 1976, a manufacturing building caught fire. The runoff from water used to extinguish the blaze contaminated the surrounding soil, aquifer and groundwater with an herbicide and various pesticides. The company filed for bankruptcy in 1980. In 1981, EPA began a cleanup of about 2,400 drums of pesticides, contaminated water and underground storage tanks. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Aidex Corporation remained involved in the cleanup effort. After removing the drums and treating contaminated soil and 187,000 gallons of water, EPA inspected remaining site buildings to make sure they were safe for reuse. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1993. Aidex Corporation’s Slow Moving Vehicles (SMV) Company moved into the on-site buildings in 1997. SMV currently manufactures slow moving vehicle indicators at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 67 people and generated an estimated $17,138,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:


Cedar Valley Electroplating

The Cedar Valley Electroplating L.L.C. site is located in Cedar Falls, Iowa. A metal electroplating business was located on site. Activities at the site resulted in improper storage and leakage of hazardous waste tanks and containers. In 2012, after Cedar Valley Electroplating failed to comply with an EPA cleanup order, EPA addressed the contamination. EPA then worked with an interested developer to support the site’s return to beneficial use. The developer took the necessary steps to qualify for liability protection as a “bona fide prospective purchaser” under the Superfund law, and EPA released its lien on the site. In 2016, the developer acquired the site property and began renovating the former electroplating facility. Today, five small-business commercial units are available for lease on site. The City of Cedar Falls recently recognized the parties responsible for the facility renovation and its successful reuse.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Electro-Coatings, Inc.

The Electro-Coatings, Inc. Superfund site is located in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. The Electro-Coatings metal plating plant sits on a 150-acre property along the shoreline of Cedar Lake. It has been in operation since 1947. Current plant operations consist of chromium, cadmium, nickel and zinc plating. Alliant Energy also operates on site. Improper storage of chemicals and leaking storage vessels resulted in the contamination of soil, groundwater, nearby wells and Cedar Lake. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup included groundwater pumping, treatment and monitoring. EPA also removed contaminated soil and concrete and disposed of the material off site. Following cleanup, EPA plans to take the site off the NPL.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 23 people and generated an estimated $3,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Fairfield Coal Gasification Plant

The Fairfield Coal Gasification Plant site occupies one city block in Fairfield, Iowa. From 1878 to 1950, the plant produced a natural gas alternative fuel from coal. Iowa Electric Light and Power, later known as IES Utilities, bought the plant in 1917 and operated the plant until 1950. At that time, the gas production system for the town switched to natural gas and the facility closed. From 1950 to 1988, IES Utilities used the property as an operations facility. Alliant Energy, which merged with IES Utilities in 1998, operates an electrical substation at the site and is currently improving the substation to double its operating capacity. Former plant operations contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. All known contaminated soil has been removed and treated. EPA is currently evaluating the effectiveness of the treatment system that is addressing the groundwater contamination that remains underneath the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Iowa City FMGP

The Iowa City Former Manufactured Gas Plant (FMGP) site is located east of downtown Iowa City, Iowa, in a mixed residential and commercial area. The Tri-City Railway and Light Company produced manufactured coal gas at the site from about 1857 through 1937. The Iowa-Illinois Gas and Electric Company ran a service facility until 1971. Other commercial uses continued until 1983, when a new site owner demolished the remaining gas plant structures. The new owner then built a 54-unit apartment building called Iowa Illinois Square on the site. During construction, the property owner found oily wastes. EPA investigated at the site in 2003. In 2004, MidAmerican removed the contents of an underground tank and filled it in. In 2010, after working with site owners and the Iowa City community the monitoring of groundwater and air quality on and around the site began. No current exposures to the community from site waste exist. The Iowa Illinois Square apartments continue to house university students and community members.
Last updated October 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


John Deere (Dubuque Works)

The John Deere (Dubuque Works) Superfund site occupies nearly 1,500 acres about 2.5 miles north of the City of Dubuque in Dubuque County, Iowa. Most of the site is undeveloped. The manufacturing facility on site has been in operation since 1946. The facility makes heavy construction equipment, including backhoes, bulldozers and forestry equipment. Former waste disposal activities and a fuel line leak in 1980 contaminated groundwater at the site. Cleanup included provision of a safe potable water supply for the facility, groundwater extraction and containment, deed restrictions to prevent potential future exposures, and a contingency plan to prevent contaminant migration in the event of a facility shutdown. In 2009, an environmental covenant was placed on the site pursuant to the Iowa Uniform Environmental Covenants Act to enhance the future enforceability and permanence of existing deed restrictions. Thanks to collaboration between EPA and Deere & Company, the John Deere facility has continued operating during the cleanup process and protects site workers from contamination. Deere & Company is proactively addressing uncertainties noted in a 2014 ecological risk assessment by placing a vegetative cover over areas of exposed soil on the former landfill. The cover includes native grasses and wildflowers. The site’s soil improvement plan will make sure there are no unacceptable exposures to ecological receptors while also providing pollinator habitat and a walking area for facility employees.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,829 people and generated an estimated $1,021,998,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


John Deere (Ottumwa Works Landfills)

The 118-acre John Deere (Ottumwa Works Landfills) Superfund site is located in Ottumwa, Wapello County, Iowa. Deere & Company has made agricultural equipment on site since 1911. From 1911 to 1973, the company landfilled facility-generated wastes on site. The City of Ottumwa receives its water from the Des Moines River, which is next to the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Under EPA oversight, Deere & Company investigated the type and extent of the contamination. Based on its findings, EPA selected a remedy that requires the company to maintain the site perimeter fence and conduct periodic groundwater and surface water monitoring. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2000. Deere & Company continues to manufacture agricultural equipment on site. In 2016, an environmental covenant was placed on the site pursuant to the Iowa Uniform Environmental Covenants Act to enhance the future enforceability and permanence of the existing deed restrictions.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,001 people and generated an estimated $175,288,575 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


LaBounty Site Capped Site Reuse

The 8-acre LaBounty Superfund site is located on the Cedar River floodplain at the southern edge of Charles City, Iowa. Salsbury Laboratories, a manufacturer of veterinary pharmaceuticals, disposed of contaminated wastes at the site from 1953 to 1977. The contaminants threatened surrounding groundwater as well as the Cedar River. The river provides drinking water to about one-third of Iowa's population. In 1981, Salsbury Laboratories placed a clay cap over the site. However, the cap failed to fully prevent contaminants from leaching into area groundwater. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1986, Salsbury Laboratories installed a groundwater diversion wall that proved to be effective. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1993. The successful cleanup has removed the threat of drinking water contamination for hundreds of thousands of Iowa residents. Skyline Construction now operates an equipment storage area on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Mason City Coal Gasification Plant

The Mason City Coal Gasification Plant Superfund site occupies 2.3 acres in Mason City, Iowa. Beginning in the early 1900s, a gas manufacturing plant on site generated "town gas" for lighting and heating purposes. Site operators decommissioned and demolished the plant in the early 1950s. Remaining residues from the gas manufacturing process, commonly referred to as coal tar, contaminated soil and groundwater. In 1984, Mason City began digging to install a new sewer line at the site. The City discovered coal tar in subsurface soil and structures. In 1994, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Potentially responsible parties removed contaminated soils and waste materials in 1997. In 2003, monitoring of the natural breakdown of groundwater contamination began. It continues today. Controls are in place to restrict land use at the site to protect human health and the environment. The site remains in continued use. Site owner Alliant Energy Corporation uses a small garage on the western edge of the site for vehicle and equipment storage and continues to operate a power substation on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Midwest Manufacturing/North Farm

The Midwest Manufacturing/North Farm Superfund site is located in and near Kellogg, Iowa. It includes two separate properties – the North Farm operable unit (OU1) and the Midwest Manufacturing operable unit (OU2). OU1 covers less than an acre and is located in a rural area outside of Kellogg. OU2 covers about 8 acres and is a former electroplating and manufacturing facility in Kellogg. The Midwest Manufacturing facility operated at OU2 from 1973 until June 1981. Sludge and wastes generated at the OU2 plant and discarded into disposal trenches at both OUs contaminated soils and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) on June 10, 1986. Cleanup included land use and groundwater restrictions as well as monitoring. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. A-Line Iron and Metals bought the OU2 facility in 2012. The company currently operates a metal recycling facility at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Peoples Natural Gas Co. Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Peoples Natural Gas Co. Superfund site occupies about 5 acres in Dubuque, Iowa. From 1890 through the 1950s, a manufactured gas plant operated on site. A survey for the proposed extension of U.S. Highway 61 by the Iowa Department of Transportation in 1983 discovered contaminated residues from the gas manufacturing process, commonly referred to as coal tar. The State found volatile organic compounds and many other contaminants in site groundwater and soil. In 1989, a removal action addressed soil contamination in the area where highway construction was to take place. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List in 1990. Cleanup included removal and treatment of contaminated soil and groundwater extraction and treatment. In the 1960s, the Peoples Natural Gas Company sold part of the site to the city of Dubuque. The city operated the Dubuque Public Works Garage on site until 2006. EPA updated the site’s remedy in 2013, including additional land use restrictions and a groundwater extraction system to capture remaining groundwater contamination. Operation and maintenance of the site’s long-term remedy and monitoring are ongoing. The city and the East Central Intergovernmental Association replaced the former public works garage with a bus storage and maintenance facility. Conversion of the property required the city to demolish the existing building, place fill material on top of the old foundation and construct the new facility on the existing foundation. The city worked with EPA to address vapor intrusion issues at the site that would have impeded the new use. The city expended more resources to rebuild on the existing site than if they had moved to another location. The facility supports the city of Dubuque’s Jule public transit system, providing storage and light maintenance space, housing dispatch and management offices and providing meeting and training facilities for employees. The Iowa Department of Transportation owns the rest of the site. The site offers potential for additional redevelopment, including support and education facilities for a solar array on an adjacent property. A section of U.S. Highway 61 crosses the western part of the site. In April 2018, EPA Region 7 will award the city of Dubuque the Leading Environmentalism and Forwarding Sustainability award for their redevelopment of the site.
Last updated January 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 85 people.  For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Shaw Avenue Dump

The Shaw Avenue Dump Superfund site is located in southeastern Charles City, Iowa. Charles City operated an unpermitted municipal waste dump on site. The 8-acre former dump sits about 500 feet east of the Cedar River. From 1949 to 1953, site operators disposed of large amounts of arsenic-contaminated solid waste from Salsbury Laboratories’ production of animal pharmaceuticals on the northern half of the site. Salsbury Laboratories also discharged liquid wastes to the Charles City wastewater treatment plant. Site operators then disposed of treatment plant sludge on the southern portion of the site. The City and the public used the area for open burning of wastes. Site investigations identified arsenic contamination in area groundwater, soil and surface waters of the Cedar River. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List in 1987. The potentially responsible parties (PRPs) started cleanup activities in 1992. They transported all contaminated materials off site for proper disposal at a permitted landfill. The successful removal of contaminated soils from the site reduced the risk of exposure to area groundwater. EPA determined that there was no need for further action to address groundwater contamination. Charles City owns the site; it stockpiles mulch along the entrance road near the wastewater treatment plant. The mulch is for use by area residents. The City also built an asphalt pad near the wastewater treatment plant to provide a dry place for residents to pick up the stockpiled mulch.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Waterloo Coal Gasification Plant

The Waterloo Coal Gasification Plant Superfund site is located in Waterloo, Iowa. A plant manufactured gas on site for lighting and heating purposes from 1901 to 1956. Gasification and purification processes created wastes that contaminated soil and groundwater. Exact disposal methods for these wastes are not known. EPA proposed listing the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. A three-phased removal action addressed contaminants’ potential impacts on groundwater and soil. Cleanup included the removal of 25,000 tons of coal tar, coal tar-impacted soil and coal tar-impacted materials. Parties have purchased several site parcels. A cold storage warehousing facility continues to operate on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


White Farm Equipment Co. Dump

The 20-acre White Farm Equipment Company Dump Superfund site is located in Charles City, Iowa. The site is an old sand-and-gravel pit that is bordered by low-lying areas, wetlands and farmland. Beginning in the early 1900s, farm equipment manufacturing occurred near the site. In the 1920s, White Farm Equipment Company started operating a disposal facility at the site. Beginning in 1971, the company disposed of foundry sand, sludges, baghouse dust and industrial wastes at the site. Disposal activities contaminated sediments, soil, surface water and groundwater. Disposal activities ended in 1985. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in August 1990. EPA’s cleanup consisted of soil capping and groundwater monitoring. Cap construction finished in 1995. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in October 2000. In 2009, EPA issued an environmental covenant to protect the site’s remedy. To encourage reuse, EPA completed a Ready for Reuse Determination for the site in 2011. EPA determined that the site is ready for recreational, commercial, industrial and other uses. With EPA approval, the site owner began to graze livestock on the property in 2013. The owner is also interested in other agricultural and ecological reuse options.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page