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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Kansas

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57th and North Broadway Streets Site Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 57th and North Broadway Streets Superfund site is located in Wichita, Kansas. The 32-acre area consists primarily of groundwater contamination located beneath residential and commercial areas. Discovery of contamination in drinking water wells in 1983 led to further investigation by the Kansas Department of Health and the Environment (KDHE). KDHE identified nearby businesses as the sources of contamination. Past activities at an oil refining plant, trucking company, abandoned gas station and abandoned paint factory led to soil and groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. EPA supplied clean water to affected residences and businesses. Cleanup also included the removal of toxic vapors from contaminated groundwater and soil. EPA’s cleanup plan allowed many residences, a used-oil refinery, trucking firms and a municipal waste water treatment plant to remain in use. Other ongoing site uses include an insurance impound lot, a school bus facility, small business operations and agricultural uses. Ongoing cleanup will further clarify the source area, control for vapors from contaminated groundwater affecting indoor air, control movement of groundwater contamination and put land use restrictions in place. Groundwater monitoring continues to track cleanup progress and additional cleanup investigations are underway.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 203 people and generated an estimated $46,279,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Ace Services

The 2.5-acre Ace Services Superfund site is located in Colby, Kansas. From 1969 to 1989, a chrome-plating facility was active on site. Its operations contaminated structures, soil and groundwater. In 1992, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment coordinated the removal of wastes from the plating shop building. In 1994, an EPA removal action cleaned up additional contaminated soils, concrete and structures. EPA added the site to the Superfund program's National Priorities List (NPL) in 1995. In 2003, site stakeholders built a groundwater treatment plant and installed extraction wells to treat contaminated groundwater. Groundwater cleanup is ongoing. The city of Colby uses the treatment plant building for office space and mobile equipment storage.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Arkansas City Dump Capped Site Reuse

The 200-acre Arkansas City Dump Superfund site is located in southwestern Arkansas City, Kansas. In the early 1900s, an oil refinery on site disposed of large quantities of toxic sludge by burying it in a 2.5-acre pit. After an explosion and fire destroyed the refinery, operators disposed of refinery-related hazardous wastes in the pit. Unregulated dumping of domestic and solid waste continued at the site until 1981. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included neutralizing the acidic sludge and covering the area with soil and vegetation. It also included controls to protect the soil cover. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996. Through the successful cleanup, EPA and the State of Kansas helped ensure that the area remains a safe location for current and future businesses. Site uses include industrial facilities and public services, enhancing the local economy while protecting ecological resources along the neighboring Arkansas River.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 59 people and generated an estimated $4,136,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Big River Sand Co.

The 123-acre Big River Sand Co. Superfund site is located in Wichita, Kansas. A sand-and-gravel mining operation was active on site. During the 1970s, site operators disposed of drums of paint-related waste on site next to a sand quarry lake. In 1978, the Big River Sand Company bought 80 acres of the site property. A state-led investigation in 1982 confirmed that many of the drums on site were damaged, corroded and leaking. Further studies found solvents and heavy metals in nearby residential wells. From 1982 to 1984, the state provided oversight of the property owner’s removal and cleanup activities. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1988, EPA determined that soil and groundwater cleanup required no further action. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1992. A sand quarry and a junkyard currently operate on site. A residence and an office are also located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 5 people and generated an estimated $4,907,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Chemical Commodities, Inc. Capped Site Reuse Pollinator Habitat Reuse

Butterfly garden fully vegetatedChemical CommoditiesThe Chemical Commodities, Inc. (CCI) Superfund site is located in Olathe, Kansas. CCI, a chemical brokerage facility, operated at the facility from 1951 to 1989. CCI conducted recycling activities that often spilled or leaked hazardous chemicals. Other on-site companies performed chemical repackaging and storage activities. CCI stored chemicals of all types on the property in aboveground and underground storage tanks and drums. Nearby residents reported many fires and explosions at the site during the 1960s and 1970s. Activities at the site resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Cleanup activities included removing and disposing of contaminated soil, putting land use controls in place, treating and managing groundwater contamination, and maintaining a vapor control system. The potentially responsible parties worked with EPA and other organizations to develop a walk-through educational natural habitat for Monarch butterflies on the site. Two outreach programs, Monarch Watch and the Pollinator Partnership, are part of the effort. Both programs work on education, research and conservation. Other groups that coordinated to develop the habitat include Monarch Joint Venture, a partnership of federal and state agencies, non-governmental organizations, and academic programs that support efforts to protect the monarch migration across the lower 48 United States; Wildlife Habitat Council, a group of corporations, conservation organizations and individuals dedicated to restoring wildlife habitat, protecting biodiversity and educating communities; and the CCI Community Advisory Group. The site includes habitat for birds, bees and butterflies, a tagging station for migrating butterflies, and information kiosks along a walking trail. An October 2012 ribbon-cutting ceremony formally opened the Olathe Pollinator Prairie at the site. Today, the site provides a beautiful landscape for the surrounding neighborhood and offers education opportunities for the community to learn about the importance of pollination.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Cherokee County Green Infrastructure Reuse

Today, the site is covered with acres of tall, waving grass harboring birds and small mammalsCherokee CountyThe Cherokee County Superfund site is located in Galena, Kansas. Over 100 years of lead and zinc mining at the 115-square-mile site resulted in contaminated soil, sediment, surface water and groundwater that continues to affect human health and the environment to this day. Hard-rock mining operations at the site ceased in 1970. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. After nearly 35 years of work at the site, about 3 million cubic yards of mining waste across nearly 2,000 acres has been cleaned up. Over 700 residential yards have been remediated. Over 500 homes have been connected to alternate sources of drinking water. About 25 square miles of the site have been restored as wildlife habitat. EPA has conducted much of the work from a local field office, to better oversee cleanup activities conducted via a series of contractual agreements, administrative orders and cooperative agreements with entities such as the State of Kansas and the Quapaw Nation. EPA also monitors operation and maintenance efforts for the many completed remedies at the site. Restoration is ongoing as part of efforts to cap and cover waste, revegetate areas for beneficial use, incorporate pollinator-friendly vegetation as part of the landscape, and encourage reuse of cleaned-up areas for agricultural, residential and light industrial purposes.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Kansas City Structural Steel

New Wal Mart supermarket at the Kansas City Structural Steel siteKansas City Structural SteelThe 22-acre Kansas City Structural Steel site is located in Kansas City, Kansas. Companies smelted silver ore and made steel products at the site for more than a century. Industrial activities from the steel plant contaminated soil with heavy metals, including lead. Cleanup took place from 1990 to 1995. Under EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible party led the cleanup. El Centro, a local nonprofit, purchased the site property in 1995 after signing an agreement with EPA to ensure that the site remedy would remain protective over the long term. El Centro’s mission is “strengthening communities and improving lives of Latinos and others through educational, social, and economic opportunities.” In 2013, the Lane4 Property Group approached El Centro, neighborhood leaders and EPA with plans to develop a grocery and retail center at the site. The Lane4 Property Group broke ground on the La Plaza Argentine shopping center in March 2014. The shopping center includes a Walmart neighborhood market. In September 2014, EPA’s regional administrator presented the Agency’s Leading Environmentalism and Forwarding Sustainability (LEAFS) Award to Walmart and the Argentine Neighborhood Development Association recognizing their leadership and redevelopment success. In June 2016, the Kansas Department of Corrections broke ground on a new police station at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 65 people and generated an estimated $12,822,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Strother Field Industrial Park Capped Site Reuse

The 2-square-mile Strother Field Industrial Park Superfund site is located near Winfield and Arkansas City, Kansas. Until 1946, a military facility for aircraft construction and maintenance operated on site. Site operators disposed of various industrial wastes in two on-site landfills. In 1982, a Kansas Department of Health and Environment survey detected dissolved organic solvents in water supply wells at the site. Further investigations found site-wide soil and groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup included groundwater extraction and treatment and monitoring of natural breakdown processes to clean up groundwater. EPA also capped two areas with concrete to help prevent the movement of precipitation and surface water runoff through area soils. Several commercial and industrial businesses are located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 27 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,373 people and generated an estimated $128,196,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Wright Ground Water Contamination

The Wright Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in Wright, Kansas. Sampling of local wells found pesticides, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds in area groundwater. Since the City of Wright did not have a municipal water supply, all residents received water from private wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. A 1997 EPA removal action extended a municipal water line for area residents. Site cleanup included monitoring of natural processes to clean up groundwater contamination and land use controls. Residential, commercial and agricultural uses at the site are ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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