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Superfund Sites in Reuse in Louisiana

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Agriculture Street Landfill Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Residences on the Agriculture Street Landfill siteAgriculture Street LandfillThe 95-acre Agriculture Street Landfill Superfund site is located in New Orleans, Louisiana. A municipal landfill operated on site from 1909 to 1957. From the 1970s through the late 1980s, parties developed about 47 acres of the site for private and public uses. The area supported 67 single-family homes, multi-family dwellings, retail businesses, an elementary school, a community center, a recreation center and an electrical substation. Before 1994, access to the undeveloped portion of the former landfill was unrestricted. This access allowed unauthorized waste disposal and exposure to contaminants. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Between 1997 and 2001, EPA excavated and disposed of nearly 70,000 tons of material. EPA replaced this material with a permeable layer below ground, clean fill and sod. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita destroyed many structures on site, with only single-family homes, several in-home businesses and the electrical substation remaining. All other structures on site await demolition or redevelopment. The rest of the site remains undeveloped and vegetated. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is temporarily relocating a rail line across part of the undeveloped site area as part of an infrastructure improvement project along the Florida Canal.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 4 people and generated an estimated $194,730 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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American Creosote Works, Inc. (Winnfield Plant) Capped Site Reuse

A local construction company stores equipment in this structure previously used for on-site incineration activitiesAmerican Creosote Works, Inc. (Winnfield Plant)The 34-acre American Creosote Works Superfund site is located in Winnfield, Louisiana. From 1901 to 1979, companies treated wood on site. In 1981, Stallworth Timber Company bought the site and continued wood treatment. Site operations contaminated soil and storage areas. Site inspections by the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality between 1982 and 1986 found chemical spills, abandoned pits and containers, and off-site contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Initial cleanup included destruction of liquid contaminants, soil caps, soil treatment and monitoring of groundwater. EPA updated the remedy in September 2016. A local construction firm currently uses part of the site for storage of heavy equipment.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Bayou Bonfouca Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

Slidell community playground at Heritage ParkBayou BonfoucaThe 54-acre Bayou Bonfouca Superfund site is located in Slidell, Louisiana. American Creosote Works, Inc. operated a creosoting facility for more than 100 years. A fire destroyed the plant in the early 1970s and released large volumes of creosote directly into the bayou. Years of unregulated waste disposal practices released contaminants into the soil, bayou water and surrounding area. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included removing and consolidating on-site contaminated soils, dredging Bayou Bonfouca’s contaminated sediments, incinerating contaminated soils and sediments on site, and removing and treating contaminated groundwater. Operations and maintenance activities are ongoing. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) operates and maintains the site’s groundwater pump-and-treat system. LDEQ also performs routine groundwater monitoring. Today, the city of Slidell (City) uses part of the site for public operations offices and other city services. Other parts of the site, including the bayou, are devoted to aquatic life conservation and recreational and public uses. During cleanup, EPA put in a boat ramp to access the bayou. Later, site owners donated this prime waterfront property to the city. The boat launch is now available for public use and provides boat access to Bayou Bonfouca. The City also coordinated with EPA and LDEQ to develop community green space and a city park, known as Heritage Park. The park includes playgrounds, picnic areas, walking/jogging paths, restrooms and a gazebo for performances and community gatherings. In 2012, the City received a $1.5 million grant to promote boating access along Bayou Bonfouca near the site. Coordination among the City, LDEQ and EPA paved the way for the Heritage Park Marina Project. The project includes floating docks, piers, trails and other amenities to encourage recreational boating on Bayou Bonfouca. The new marina will provide boaters with access to Heritage Park and downtown Slidell from Lake Pontchartrain. In April 2017, the City held a groundbreaking ceremony to kick off the project. Heritage Park Marina will open in the summer of 2018. In May 2018, EPA Region 6 recognized the community’s efforts with its Excellence in Site Reuse Award.
Last updated May 2018

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 130 people and generated an estimated $7,517,698 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Bayou Verdine Capped Site Reuse Pollinator Habitat Reuse

Wildflowers at the siteBayou VerdineThe Bayou Verdine Superfund site is located in the Calcasieu Estuary in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Surrounding areas support commercial and heavy industrial uses, with some natural riparian areas. Over time, contaminants from heavy industry, refinery operations and stormwater runoff accumulated in sediments and surface water of Bayou Verdine. In 1999, EPA began studying the Calcasieu Estuary and found high levels of metals and hazardous chemicals. In 2011, EPA and the responsible parties, Phillips 66 and Sasol North America, entered an agreement for the cleanup of a two-mile stretch of Bayou Verdine. The parties removed contaminated sediments, put them in a containment cell on the refinery property and then capped the containment cell. Phillips 66 also reinforced parts of the bayou shoreline, which runs through the Phillips 66 refinery property, to prevent future erosion. To improve the ecological function of the area, EPA and the parties worked together on ecological enhancements. After sediment removal, a pond west of the containment cell remained as wildlife habitat. The parties connected the pond to Bayou Verdine through a drainage bioswale designed to reduce erosion and provide additional habitat for wildlife and fish. The parties also seeded the containment cell cap with native wildflowers to create pollinator habitat.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Central Wood Preserving Co. Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 17-acre Central Wood Preserving Co. Superfund site is located in East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. From the 1950s to 1973, the Central Creosoting Company operated a wood-treating facility at the site. Wood-treating products contaminated site soils, sediments and groundwater. In 1991, the company filed for bankruptcy and closed the facility. Initial cleanup actions included removing tanks and contaminated soils near the main facility and installing a fence around the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Additional cleanup work includes treating contaminated soils, filling excavated areas with clean soil, replanting these areas and monitoring groundwater. EPA worked with the community to include future use considerations in site cleanup and restoration plans. The East Feliciana Parish reuse plan allowed for site grading and planting of Loblolly Pine seedlings, Cherrybark Oak trees and grasses. The Parish uses the site as a staging area for brush and wood debris collected after hurricane/storm-related events and residential tree maintenance.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Delatte Metals

The 57-acre Delatte Metals Superfund site is located in Tangipahoa Parish, near Ponchatoula, Louisiana. In the 1960s, two battery recycling and smelting operations were active on site. Facility operations and waste disposal practices resulted in soil, sediment, surface water and groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Cleanup activities included excavation, solidification and disposal of contaminated soil, installation of a permeable reactive barrier to raise the pH of groundwater, decontamination and disposal of on-site buildings and concrete slabs, site fencing, institutional controls, and groundwater monitoring. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2005. A residence and a machine shop are currently located on site.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Gulf Coast Vacuum Services Capped Site Reuse

The fenced area north of the limestone road is being used by the Vermilion Parish Police Jury as a vehicle maintenance areaGulf Coast Vacuum ServicesThe 12.8-acre Gulf Coast Vacuum Services Superfund site is located near Abbeville, Louisiana. Starting in 1969, Gulf Coast Vacuum Services (GCVS) operated a vacuum truck facility and stored oil drilling mud on site. These operations involved dumping waste materials and disposing of used rinse water in on-site pits. The waste disposal practices contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included soil stabilization and capping. About 8 acres of the site are now cleaned up and available for unrestricted use. In September 1999, site owners and the Vermilion Parish Police Jury (VPPJ) entered into a site use and access agreement. VPPJ currently uses part of the site for vehicle maintenance activities. As part of the agreement, VPPJ maintains the access roads and gates. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2001.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Gulf State Utilities-North Ryan Street Capped Site Reuse

The main Entergy administrative building, located at 303 North Ryan StreetGulf State Utilities - North Ryan StreetThe 20-acre Gulf State Utilities North Ryan Street Superfund site is located on the Calcasieu River in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Beginning in 1916, various companies manufactured gas at the site. Site operators discharged coal tar byproducts into wetlands surrounding the site. Operators also repurposed a 6-acre wetlands area as a landfill and disposed of contaminated electrical equipment, drums, transformer oil and other wastes there. With the availability of natural gas later in the century, coal gas production activities ended at the site in 1932. In 1988, utility workers digging a trench found oily material seeping from the ground. Investigations found that site activities had contaminated soil, sediment and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. EPA proposed the site for listing on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1995. Cleanup included removing contaminated soil and sediment, dewatering, and on-site consolidation and capping of contamination. After completing river dredging, the potentially responsible party (PRP) covered part of the southern bank of the Calcasieu River with a mat of concrete blocks to help stabilize the shoreline and protect the restored area. The remedy also included land and groundwater use restrictions. Long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing. The site’s remedy allows for continued use of the site for industrial and commercial purposes. The site is home to the Lake Charles Division Service Center of Entergy Gulf States Louisiana, LLC, an electrical power production and retail distribution company.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 150 people and generated an estimated $1,180,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Highway 71/72 Refinery Core Infrastructure Reuse

Marriot hotel on the siteHighway 71/72 RefineryThe 215-acre Highway 71/72 Refinery site is located in Bossier City, Louisiana. Between 1923 and 1929, the Louisiana Oil Refining Corporation built a refinery to produce home heating and fuel oil. In the mid-1950s, parties dismantled, removed and sold the refinery. In the mid-1960s, construction began for a corridor of Interstate Highway 20 (I-20) across the site. Initial construction work uncovered contaminated soil and groundwater as well as railroad and waste materials. The site owner began cleanup efforts in 1966. Soon after initial cleanup activities and construction of the I-20 corridor, redevelopment of the site followed. After additional investigations, the potentially responsible party (PRP) completed removal actions for soil and indoor air between 1996 and 1999. Under the Superfund Alternative Approach, the PRP completes soil cleanup at no cost to residents or businesses if soil sampling or future construction projects uncover buried waste. The PRP also installs mitigation measures if sampling finds that unacceptable levels of contamination have migrated into indoor air. Land and water use restrictions are in place. Today, site uses include single-family homes, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, churches and light industrial businesses. About 3,500 people live in the former refinery area.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 53 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 511 people and generated an estimated $51,391,010 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Mallard Bay Landing Bulk Plant

The 10-acre Mallard Bay Landing Bulk Plant (MBLP) Superfund site is located in Cameron Parish, northeast of Grand Chenier, Louisiana. The site consists of two 5-acre areas separated by Talen’s Marine, a marina and dock. From early 1980 through 1983, the MBLP facility operated as a crude oil refinery. In 1987, the owners filed for bankruptcy and the facility closed. An inspection in 1993 revealed oily liquids and sludges in tanks and other environmental concerns. Initial cleanup activities included the removal and off-site disposal of oil and waste material from on-site tanks. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000 to address remaining contamination. In 2003 and 2004, EPA removed all remaining tank sludges, contaminated soil and structures. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2005. Talen’s Marine is currently using the site as a staging and storage area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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