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Superfund Sites in Reuse in Massachusetts

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Atlas Tack Corp.

Atlas Tack Corp Superfund SiteAtlas Tack Corp.The Atlas Tack Corporation Superfund site is located in Fairhaven, Massachusetts. It covers about 48 acres and includes upland areas, wetlands and saltwater marsh. From 1901 to 1985, the Atlas Tack facility made a variety of metal products, including tacks and steel nails, on site. Operations released waste containing acids, metals, and solvents into drains and an unlined lagoon near a marsh area. Waste disposal practices resulted in contamination of soil, surface water, sediment and groundwater. In 1990, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included demolition of most remaining site structures, removal of contaminated soil, groundwater monitoring and site restoration. EPA completed these activities in 2007; monitoring began in 2008. Restored wetlands and the saltwater marsh now provide habitat for plants, fish and wildlife. Birders frequent the site for bird-watching activities. These Citizen Scientists have recorded several species on site, including the Pie-billed Grebe, the American Bittern and the Least Bittern, which are endangered in the state of Massachusetts. Potential future development at the site could include commercial and industrial reuse of upland areas.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Bendix Property (Former)

Bendix Property (Former)Bendix Property (Former)

The 17.5-acre Former Bendix Property site is located in Greenfield, Massachusetts. A metalworking facility that made drill bits, taps and dies was located on site. A 94,000-square-foot, single-story building sat vacant for about 10 years and deteriorated. Openings in the roof allowed in rain and snow. The rain and snow damaged the heat and water piping, which was wrapped with asbestos-containing insulation wrap. Chromium-containing powder was present in and around the building. EPA removed contaminated materials and devices as well as chromium-containing powder, capacitors and contaminated water, and transported them to approved facilities. A metal tank and bin production company from Holyoke, Massachusetts, is interested in buying the site property to enlarge its operations.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.


Cannon Engineering Corp. (CEC)

On-site business sells and distributes propane and sells gas appliances as well as related equipment.Cannon Engineering Corp. (CEC)The 6-acre Cannon Engineering Corporation (CEC) Superfund site is located in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. Beginning in the 1970s, CEC transported, stored and burned hazardous wastes at the site. Mishandling of the waste and reporting violations led to the facility closing in 1980. In 1982, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) removed contaminated sludge and drums from the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included installation of fencing, soil treatment of lesser-contaminated soils, excavation and disposal of highly contaminated soils, groundwater monitoring, decontamination and removal of contaminated buildings and structures, restoration of wetlands, and institutional controls. CEC completed cleanup in 2013. In the mid-1990s, Osterman Propane Distribution (Osterman) relocated to the former CEC facility. Osterman stores and distributes propane at the site. It also sells gas appliances and related equipment. In 1998, Omnipoint Communications Enterprises began leasing the property and built a cellular communication tower. In 2013, EPA, with concurrence from MassDEP, took the site off the NPL. EPA continues to monitor the site, conducting a review of the cleanup actions every five years to make sure the remedy remains protective of human health and the environment.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 9 people and generated an estimated $2,369,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Charles-George Reclamation Trust Landfill

The 70-acre Charles George Reclamation Trust Landfill is located in Tyngsborough, Massachusetts. Initially a small municipal dump, the landfill expanded to accept household and industrial wastes, chemicals containing volatile organic compounds and metal sludge. The state ordered the landfill closed in 1983. Site operations contaminated groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included providing a permanent water supply to residents affected by contaminated groundwater, capping the landfill, and collecting contaminated liquid draining from the landfill (leachate), groundwater and landfill gas. The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection operates the landfill gas collection/destruction system, groundwater/leachate collection system and maintains the cap. In 2016, Citizens Energy Corporation completed construction of a 3.56-megawatt solar photovoltaic facility on the landfill.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Flynntan

The Flynntan Tannery site is located in Salem, Massachusetts. A leather tannery operated on site. EPA worked to clean up the site after the tannery’s closure. A real estate developer bought the site property and has begun redeveloping it with housing units and commercial space.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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GE - Housatonic River Alternative Energy Reuse Athletic Fields Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The GE-Pittsfield/Housatonic River (GE-Housatonic River) site includes a 254-acre former manufacturing facility, filled river oxbows, neighboring commercial properties, Allendale School, Silver Lake, the Housatonic River, floodplains and other areas. The site contains contamination released from the General Electric Company (GE) facility in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. A cleanup decision for portions of the Housatonic River is currently pending. A consent decree entered in federal court in 2000 outlined the cleanup of all other areas of the site. Nineteen of 20 cleanup actions outside the river are now complete. EPA expects completion of remaining cleanup actions outside the river in the next two years. Cleanup of two miles of the Housatonic River is also already complete. As part of ongoing cleanup activities, the community prioritized the reuse of the former GE facility, located in the heart of downtown Pittsfield. Funded by a Superfund Redevelopment pilot grant from EPA, the Pittsfield Economic Development Authority (PEDA) developed a reuse plan. The plan outlined opportunities for sports fields and an office park. In 2004, GE built a 3-acre recreational facility on site for the community. The facility includes a baseball diamond, soccer field, jogging track, equipment storage, fencing and lighting. Between 2005 and 2012, PEDA received ownership of 50 acres at the site for the development of the William Stanley Business Park. The facility provides commercial and industrial space for area businesses. The park’s first tenant, a financial services company, built a 170,000-square-foot building that opened in 2012. Western Massachusetts Electric Company installed an 8-acre solar power facility in 2010, using 2 acres of the site and 6 acres of an adjacent property. In 2014, PEDA received a $9 million state grant to design and build the Berkshire Innovation Center. The facility will support shared research, early-stage production and commercialization, and work force training for life science companies and related businesses. In 2017, a developer in coordination with PEDA submitted plans to construct a 190,000-square-foot Super Walmart on a 16-acre portion of the site. Permitting and construction is expected to take two to three years and cost about $30 million. Two large employers continue to operate on the GE-owned portion of the 254-acre facility. Continued uses on the non-GE owned portion of the site (excluding the Rest of River) include an elementary school, about 86 residential properties, about 35 commercial properties and a city park.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 31 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,035 people and generated an estimated $18,252,327 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Groveland Wells Alternative Energy Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 850-acre Groveland Wells Superfund site is located in Groveland, Essex County, Massachusetts. The former Valley Manufacturing Products Company produced metal and plastic parts on site until 2002. The potentially responsible parties (PRPs) released cutting oils and chlorinated hazardous solvents on site. Additional waste leaked from storage tanks and disposal systems at the facility. Site releases contaminated the Town of Groveland’s public water supply. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1982. In late 1987 and early 1988, the PRPs installed and used soil vapor extraction (SVE) to remove contaminants from site soils. The PRPs also installed a small groundwater treatment system in 1988. However, these systems were ineffective. EPA then designed and installed a large groundwater treatment system in 2000. In 2006, EPA removed abandoned underground storage tanks, a former disposal system and contaminated soils from the site. In addition, from 2009 to 2011, EPA designed, installed and operated an electrical resistive heating treatment system to replace the SVE system. Treatment activities were effective and concluded in 2014. The Groveland Department of Public Works continue to operate on site. In 2012, a 3.6-megawatt solar array was installed on site. It provides power for more than 500 homes. The site remains in continued residential, commercial and industrial use. EPA continues to monitor conditions, conducting a review of the cleanup actions every five years to make sure the remedy remains protective of human health and the environment.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 32 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 234 people and generated an estimated $22,192,757 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Hatheway & Patterson Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Foxboro commuter parking lot on the Hatheway and Patterson site.Hatheway & PattersonThe 38-acre Hatheway & Patterson Superfund site is located in Mansfield and Foxborough, Massachusetts. The site includes the area where the Hatheway and Patterson Company operated a wood-preserving facility from 1953 to 1993. Releases of chemicals used during these operations resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. It also resulted in contamination of sediment and surface water in the Rumford River’s fisheries and surrounding wetlands. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2002. Cleanup included removal of contaminated soil, capping of a 2-acre area, institutional controls and long-term monitoring of groundwater, surface water, fish tissue and sediment. EPA completed cleanup in 2011. Today, a 119-space commuter parking lot is located on part of the site. It serves the nearby Mansfield commuter rail station. The Town of Mansfield also uses part of the site for emergency vehicle storage and a remaining building for office space. The Mansfield portion of the site along County Street in not currently in use.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Industri-Plex Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Industri-PlexIndustri-PlexThe Industri-Plex Superfund site in Woburn, Massachusetts, is located 12 miles outside of Boston. From 1853 to 1969, several manufacturers produced chemicals, insecticides, munitions and glue products at the site. Large waste piles, heavy metals and hazardous chemicals collected on site. This waste resulted in groundwater, surface water, soil and sediment contamination. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup included placement of protective covers over contaminated parts of the site, dredging and off-site disposal of contaminated sediments, construction of wetlands, and institutional controls. The covers were compatible with productive reuse of the areas. During and after initial cleanup activities, several public- and private-sector improvements took place. They included a new interstate highway exchange, public roads, a 200,000-square-foot shopping center, an office park and a hotel complex. Restored wetlands and grass-covered hills provide scenic open space at the site. The site’s successful redevelopment was recognized by the prestigious Phoenix Award in 2000. In 2001, the 34-acre, $10 million James Anderson Regional Transportation Center opened at the site. The center relieves congestion on highways leading into Boston and eases commutes for many area residents. In 2008 and 2009, additional redevelopment included a restaurant, a pet supply store and a furniture store. EPA, the state and local government worked with the developer to record property use restrictions, prepare work plans, tear down the existing building and support the property’s transformation. An additional phase of cleanup is nearing completion. Mitigation projects along the Aberjona River include floodplain enhancements and the Aberjona Nature Trail as well as a fish ladder at the Center Falls Dam in nearby Winchester.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 62 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,175 people and generated an estimated $205,948,123 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Intervale Street

Intervale StreetIntervale StreetThe Intervale site is located in Quincy, Massachusetts. A metals recycling business operated on site. Sampling in 2012 detected polychlorinated biphenyls, lead, arsenic and chromium in site soils. EPA removed about 4,400 tons of contaminated soil in 2014 and 2015. The City of Quincy will offer the site property for sale after completion of EPA’s cleanup activities.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Iron Horse Park Alternative Energy Reuse Capped Site Reuse

Iron Horse ParkIron Horse ParkThe Iron Horse Park Superfund site is a 553-acre industrial complex in Billerica, Massachusetts. Industrial activities, which began in 1913, included manufacturing, rail yard maintenance, waste storage and landfilling. These operations resulted in soil, groundwater and surface water contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup is ongoing. Cleanup activities have included removing contaminated soil, backfilling areas with clean soil, capping contaminated soil areas, and closing and capping landfills. These activities supported the continued operation of industrial businesses on site, including lumber, manufacturing and rail yard maintenance facilities. Cleanup also restored natural marshes and new wetland habitats. In 2012, site stakeholders began a project to place solar panels on Shaffer Landfill, a former waste disposal area. After coordinating with EPA and the state, the town of Billerica signed a payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) agreement in August 2013. The agreement guarantees project revenue over 25 years. With the agreement in place, construction of the 25-acre solar array began in early 2014. Urban Green Technologies (UGT), the solar developer, placed 20,000 solar panels over the capped landfill. EPA worked with UGT to address the challenge of installing solar panels on the sloped landfill while ensuring its cap remained intact. In August 2014, EPA, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, UGT and the town of Billerica held a ceremony marking the project’s completion. The six-megawatt facility allows the community to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and gain significant long-term energy cost savings. In 2014, EPA Region 1 recognized the project team, including the town of Billerica, UGT and Capital Dynamics, with its first Excellence in Site Reuse award. Since project construction finished in 2014, two additional solar projects have followed. The second was a four-megawatt array near the entrance to the Iron Horse Park facility. In 2017, another six-megawatt, 25-acre solar facility was constructed on site. Part of the facility is located on one of the closed Iron Horse Park landfills. UGT was the solar developer for the project, working with Pan Am Railways (the property owner) and the town of Billerica and coordinating with EPA and the state to make sure the installed facility would not negatively impact the landfill.
Last updated September 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 9 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 358 people and generated an estimated $81,095,697 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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King Philip Mills

The King Philip Mills site is located in Fall River, Massachusetts. A cotton mill was built on site between 1871 and 1892. EPA identified drums, containers and cylinders at the site. In November 2014, EPA completed a time-critical removal action to remove contaminated drums and containers as well as asbestos-containing material. EPA completed a second time-critical removal action in March 2017 to remove polychlorinated biphenyl oils from contaminated materials. In June 2017, a developer bought the site property at auction. The developer plans to create about 90 upscale residential units and open space with public access along Cook Pond.
Last updated July 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Lawrence Metals (Former)

Lawrence Metals (Former)Lawrence Metals (Former)The Former Lawrence Metals site is located in Chelsea, Massachusetts. From the late nineteenth century until 1974, when a fire destroyed the building, owner operators used the site property for textile production, barrel cleaning and painting. From 1979 to 1986, operators used the property for warehouse space. In 1986, the Lawrence Metals Forming Company began operating on site. Its operations resulted in the contamination of soil and site materials. In 1999, the City of Chelsea acquired the site property under an Urban Renewal Plan. The City demolished the site building in 2000. EPA, the City and the State coordinated cleanup, including the excavation of contaminated soil. The project was particularly challenging because of its proximity to a school and a city swimming pool. An upscale, extended-stay hotel is now located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 25 people and generated an estimated $124,120 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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New Bedford Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 18,000-acre New Bedford Harbor Superfund site is located in New Bedford, Massachusetts. At least two companies produced electric devices on site from 1940 to the late 1970s. Operations discharged industrial wastes into the harbor, which contaminated the estuary from the upper Acushnet River into Buzzards Bay. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Ongoing cleanup activities include the removal and disposal of contaminated sediments at approved off-site facilities. Cleanup plans also include removal of contaminated sediment and wetland restoration at shoreline properties. Dredging has taken place at the site for over 10 years. After cleanup, New Bedford will reuse EPA’s shoreline dewatering facility as an intermodal transportation facility. The facility, located on the city’s working waterfront, will include berthing space for freighters and commercial fishing vessels, a 55,000-square-foot warehouse, and a rail spur that connects to the City’s rail yard. In 2009, cleanup activities led to the discovery of a shipwrecked vessel in the harbor. Archeological testing dated the vessel to the late 1700s or early 1800s. In 2011, EPA completed demolition of the 11-acre Aerovox mill, located along the Acushnet River. The area will provide the City with space for future redevelopment. Residents use the harbor for recreational activities such as rowing. Additionally, the cleanup plan allows for additional dredging efforts by local and state stakeholders. Dredging of the harbor, which enhances the remedy by removing sediment not addressed by the Superfund cleanup, has resulted in improvements to the harbor as a commercial port. It paved the way for the recent construction of the New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal, a 28-acre marine terminal. Redevelopment along the river is ongoing. Projects include the repurposing of former mills for apartments and commercial space. Riverside plans include a Riverwalk along the Upper Harbor and habitat restoration. EPA’s cleanup will address contamination along the shoreline prior to construction of the Riverwalk. Completion of the cleanup will allow for further redevelopment and repurposing of buildings along the shoreline.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Norwood PCBs Capped Site Reuse Green Remediation Reuse

The Monkey Sports Superstore is located adjacent to the capped area, which is covered with asphalt and used as a parking lot.Norwood PCBsThe 26-acre Norwood PCBs Superfund site is located in Norwood, Massachusetts. From 1942 through the mid-1980s, several businesses made and maintained electrical components on site. During site investigations, EPA found polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil and groundwater on site and in the sediment of a nearby brook. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup included removing contaminated soil and sediment and consolidating it beneath an asphalt cap. It also included demolition of on-site structures and long-term monitoring. A groundwater treatment facility operated on site until 2001. In 2008, the site owner and developers completed a 56,000-square-foot commercial retail facility on site. Developers located new buildings next to the capped area. They increased the thickness of the asphalt cap remedy to allow for its use as a parking lot. An athletic goods manufacturing company and a fitness gym are currently located in the facility. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2011.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 13 people and generated an estimated $1,061,933 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Cultural/Historical Reuse

A photograph facing east showing the remediated and restored 5.5-acre Eastern Wetland. Nyanza Chemical Waste DumpThe 35-acre Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site is located in Ashland, Massachusetts. From 1917 to 1978, companies made textile dyes, dye intermediates and other products at the site. Operators buried solid waste on site. They also released wastewater to a system of lagoons and storage areas that were periodically drained; the solid material was excavated and placed on a hill. Overland flow from the hill resulted in the contamination of nearby wetlands and surface water bodies, including Eastern Wetland and the Sudbury River. These improper waste-handling practices also resulted in groundwater, soil and sediment contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In the mid-1990s, indoor air samples from residences near the site and above a contaminated groundwater plume found potentially unsafe levels of volatile chemicals in indoor air. Cleanup activities included removing sludge and contaminated soils and sediments, placing a cap over contaminated soils, and installing systems to stop vapors from coming into homes. Cleanup also included extensive wetland restoration. Sediment and fish tissue monitoring for heavy metals has also been conducted in impacted reaches of the Sudbury River, and fish consumption advisories have been posted. While cleanup decisions have been made for most of the site, EPA has not yet selected the final groundwater remedy. Several businesses, including Nyacol Nano Technologies, Inc., continue to operate at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 8 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 46 people and generated an estimated $11,095,150 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Parsons Paper Mill

Parsons Paper MillParsons Paper MillThe 4.6-acre Parsons Paper site is located in Holyoke, Massachusetts. From 1896 to 2004, operators made writing and stationary paper as well as artist paper and archival paper for the art and framing industries on site. In 2008, a fire destroyed about 50 percent of the mill. The fire also damaged remaining parts of the interconnected building complex. In 2009, EPA sampling identified asbestos in the burned areas. Sources of asbestos includes asphalt shingles, window glazing and caulking, tank and pipe insulation, transite siding, cements and mastics, and floor tiles. In 2009 and 2010, EPA removed hazardous materials and asbestos that posed a threat to public health. In 2016, building demolition began for the expansion of Holyoke manufacturer Aegis Energy Services on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Peabody Street Asbestos

Peabody Street AsbestosPeabody Street AsbestosThe Peabody Street Asbestos site is located in Salem, Massachusetts. The City of Salem identified asbestos during construction of a park in the downtown area. EPA excavated contaminated soil because of the urban setting and because the City and State did not have funds for the excavation. EPA recovered most expenses from the polluter. The City resumed construction of the park after EPA completed the excavation. Completed in 2010, the park serves as a gateway to the City of Salem’s harbor. The park includes a playground, a canopy area, and seating for outdoor entertainment as well as game tables, benches and landscaping.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Re-Solve, Inc. Capped Site Reuse

The 6-acre Re-Solve, Inc. Superfund site is a former waste chemical reclamation facility in North Dartmouth, Massachusetts. Between 1956 and 1980, site operators disposed of residues from operations, liquid sludge waste, impure solvents and burned tires in on-site unlined lagoons. Site operators also spread oil waste over the site to control dust. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA and the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) constructed a groundwater pump-and-treat system at the site. The system has operated continuously since 1998. As part of the cleanup, EPA and the PRPs restored 1 acre of wetlands at the site. The PRPs also worked closely with EPA and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) to convert 4 acres of the site into a native meadow for ecological reuse. The PRPs placed bird boxes, brush piles and sand piles for turtles to enhance the meadow habitat. An annual fishing derby at Cornell Pond on site engages the community in fish monitoring activities. EPA and the PRPs have also collaboratively evaluated sustainable treatment enhancements for the groundwater treatment system since 2004. In 2015, two anaerobic bio-reactor systems were located on site. The systems are underground, contained biological treatment beds where living organisms break down contamination. This process reduces the use of chemicals and the need for waste disposal. The groundwater treatment system is powered entirely by 644 solar panels.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Sullivan's Ledge Alternative Energy Reuse Capped Site Reuse

Solar Array System Installation, April 2014Sullivan's LedgeThe Sullivan’s Ledge Superfund site is located in New Bedford, Massachusetts. A 12-acre quarry operated on site until 1921. In 1935, the City of New Bedford took over the site and turned it into a dump for hazardous materials. Waste disposal activities took place on site from the 1940s through the 1970s. The City then closed the dump and backfilled the disposal areas. In 1982, during investigations associated with a proposed parking lot development, the Massachusetts Department of Public Works, now the Massachusetts Highway Department, found soil contamination at the site. EPA conducted studies in the area and subsequently placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included removing contaminated soil and sediment and capping the site. Cleanup also included removing contamination from a neighboring golf course. EPA’s approach allowed for continued use of the golf course during cleanup. EPA also restored 13 acres of affected wetlands. Restoration work finished in 2002. Today, the wetlands provide habitat for many wildlife species, including the great blue heron, great egret, red-tailed hawk and spotted turtle. In 2013, EPA approved the installation of a 1.75-megawatt solar project on the capped part of the site. Project partners SunEdison, Beaumont Solar, Pro-Tech Energy Solutions and BlueWave Capital completed construction in 2014. The 10-acre system includes more than 5,000 solar panels. A partnership between BlueWave Capital and the City of New Bedford is supporting further solar projects around New Bedford. The City of New Bedford buys energy generated from the solar arrays. This enables the City to increase its use of renewable energy sources and save 30 percent on municipal electricity bills. Over the course of 20 years, New Bedford will save about $2.7 million in energy costs through the purchase of solar net metering credits. In 2014, EPA recognized the project team, including the City of New Bedford, BlueWave Capital and SunEdison, with Region 1’s first Excellence in Site Reuse Award.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 20 people and generated an estimated $1,348,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Sutton Brook Disposal Area

The 50-acre Sutton Brook Disposal Area Superfund site is located in Tewksbury, Massachusetts. From 1957 until 1988, a landfill operated on site, accepting municipal, commercial and industrial wastes. Waste disposal practices led to soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater and air contamination. In 1983, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection inspected the landfill and took water samples from a nearby brook. The samples showed the presence of organic compounds. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in July 2000. EPA performed three short-term cleanups on and near the site, excavating and removing highly contaminated soils and drums. The site’s long-term remedy included excavation of additional soils and sediments, consolidation of this material in on-site landfills, landfill capping, and wetlands restoration. It also included groundwater collection and treatment, monitored natural attenuation for groundwater outside the extraction system area, institutional controls and long-term monitoring. Cleanup finished in July 2016. The site now includes restored wetlands, providing habitat for local plants and animals.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Universal Steel & Trading Corporation

Universal Steel & Trading CorporationUniversal Steel & Trading CorporationThe 1.2-acre Former Universal Steel site is located in Salem, Massachusetts. From 1936 to 1998, metal recycling and reclamation activities took place on the site property. Activities included processing scrap metals and demolition debris, dismantling and processing transformers, and stockpiling automotive batteries. These activities contaminated site soil. EPA, the City of Salem, MassDevelopment and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection worked together to clean up the site. Cleanup activities included excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and debris, collection and disposal of lubrication oil, asbestos removal, and building demolition. FW Webb, a plumbing supply company, is buying the site property. FW Webb plans to use the property for parking, loading and storage as part of an 8,000-square-foot addition to the existing facility next door.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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W.R. Grace & Co., Inc. (Acton Plant)

W.R. Grace & Co., Inc. (Acton Plant)W.R. Grace & Co., Inc. (Acton Plant)The 260-acre W.R. Grace & Co., Inc. (Action Plant) Superfund site is located in the towns of Acton and Concord, Massachusetts. For over 100 years, different companies operated a chemical manufacturing facility on site. W.R. Grace, the last site owner, ceased all operations in 1991. Facility operators created wastewater and solid industrial wastes and disposed of them in several unlined lagoons and an on-site landfill. These practices contaminated soils, groundwater, surface water and sediments. In 1978, investigations found contamination in two municipal wells in Acton. EPA directed W.R. Grace to begin interim cleanup actions at the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. Interim cleanup actions included groundwater extraction and treatment and removal of hazardous storage tanks. Final cleanup actions included landfill and lagoon closure, capping of site soils and sludges, sediment dredging and removal, additional groundwater extraction and treatment, and restoration of site wetlands. After the site’s remedy was in place, the Town of Concord took ownership of a 70-acre parcel at the site in 2016. The first phase of the Town’s three-phase reuse plan involved construction of a 4.5-megawatt solar array, which was completed in early 2017. This project added more green, competitively priced energy to the Town's power supply portfolio. It is expected to supply 4.5 percent of the town's power supply needs, enough to power 625 homes. Additionally, the solar array will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and offset the Town's peak demand for electricity by 10 percent. Planning for remaining reuse phases – for a school bus depot and a wastewater treatment facility – is underway.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Wells G&H

Wells G&HWells G&HThe Wells G & H Superfund site includes 330 acres of land and contaminated groundwater in Woburn, Massachusetts. Past operations at the site include dry cleaning, solvent storage, truck terminals, drum disposal and plastics manufacturing. In 1979, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) discovered significant levels of hazardous chemicals in two municipal supply wells. These wells were known as Wells G and H. MassDEP closed the wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included removing debris and contaminated soils and treating contaminated soils on site. Cleanup also included groundwater removal and treatment. In 2002, the City of Woburn’s Redevelopment Authority began exploring reuse options for the site. Recommendations for three site parcels included an ice skating rink, office and retail space, and nature and walking trails. At the first parcel, the property owner cleared a junkyard of dismantled cars and turned part of the parcel into an ice skating arena. The property owner also leases parts of the property to several small businesses. These businesses include a dog care facility, a bus storage yard and an auto supplier shop. The second parcel supports commercial reuse – a hotel and three restaurants. The City of Woburn owns the third parcel. In 2017, after sediment cleanup in the Aberjona River floodplain and in conjunction with the second phase of the Industri-Plex Superfund site cleanup, the Aberjona Nature Trail was established on the parcel. The trail provides recreation and wildlife viewing opportunities.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 302 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 2,709 people and generated an estimated $406,346,084 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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