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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Michigan

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Aircraft Components (D & L Sales) Capped Site Reuse

The 17-acre Aircraft Components (D & L Sales) Superfund site is located next to the Paw Paw River in Benton Harbor, Michigan. Several manufacturing companies operated on site, including an airplane parts resale business. Some of the aircraft parts contained radioactive paint. Site investigations found that some of the aircraft parts had deteriorated, raising concerns that radioactive paint and dust could leak out. EPA led emergency cleanup activities in 1995, installing a gate and fencing, boarding up buildings, posting warning signs, covering piles of radioactive materials, and consolidating waste materials. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. Cleanup included removal and disposal of radioactive materials, contaminated soil and sediment as well as cleanup and demolition of on-site buildings and groundwater treatment. Today, the site is part of a community-wide development project. Hole 14 of the Harbor Shores Golf Course is located on part of the site. In 2017, construction of a brewery expansion began on site. After completion of the expansion, the site will be fully redeveloped.
Last updated February 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Allied Paper, Inc./Portage Creek/Kalamazoo River Capped Site Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

Allied Paper, Inc./Portage Creek/Kalamazoo RiverAllied Paper, Inc./Portage Creek/Kalamazoo RiverThe Allied Paper, Inc./Portage Creek/Kalamazoo River Superfund site is located in Allegan and Kalamazoo counties in Michigan. The site includes 80 miles of the Kalamazoo River, river banks and floodplains, a 3-mile stretch of Portage Creek, five landfills and a paper mill. The paper mill and the landfills discharged contaminated paper residuals into Portage Creek and the Kalamazoo River, contaminating soil and sediment. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup included soil removal, stabilization, capping and installation of groundwater monitoring systems at four of the five landfills. In 2006, the City of Plainwell purchased part of the site – the former paper mill property. This area is now part of a Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places. EPA provided reuse planning assistance to support the City's evaluation of reuse opportunities in 2008. Redevelopment work began in 2010, when the City of Plainwell and Conestoga-Rovers & Associates (CRA) entered into an agreement for the redevelopment of the 36-acre former paper mill. CRA relocated its U.S. construction headquarters and 50 jobs to the site in 2012. The City of Plainwell completed a $1.7 million renovation of the former dewatering building to house its Public Safety Department. The City moved Plainwell City Hall into renovated office space in the former paper mill building on site. Local artists used salvaged materials to create a sculpture near the main entrance to the renovated mill complex. A new restaurant opened on site in 2018. CRA and city officials remain focused on opportunities for additional commercial, residential and community uses at the site. The community also uses the adjacent Kalamazoo River for swimming, boating and fishing.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 125 people and generated an estimated $849,529 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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American Anodco, Inc.

The 8-acre American Anodco Superfund site is located in Ionia, Michigan. Since 1962, American Anodco has cleaned or treated aluminum parts for the automotive industry on site. The company’s past operations contaminated groundwater, sediment, soil and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. In 1987, EPA required the responsible parties to dewater the lagoons, remove sludge and dispose of it off site and monitor the groundwater. Site cleanup is complete. A final close out report will be prepared and approved, and the site will be proposed for deletion from the NPL. American Anodco continues to operate at the site.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 102 people and generated an estimated $23,364,103 in annual sales revenue.  For additional information click here.

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Anderson Development Co.

The 12-acre Anderson Development Co. Superfund site is located in Adrian, Michigan. From 1970 to 1979, Anderson Development Company (ADC) produced highly toxic chemicals on site. Operators released discharges from manufacturing processes to surface water and air, causing widespread contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) led cleanup activities at the site and at off-site residences under EPA and state oversight. Activities included sampling and cleanup of affected homes, treatment of contaminated soils and sediments, and extension of the public water supply. Cleanup finished in 1993. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996. ADC’s chemical manufacturing facility remains active on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 115 people and generated an estimated $49,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Avenue "E" Ground Water Contamination

The 435-acre Avenue “E” Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in Traverse City, Michigan. The site includes an active U.S. Coast Guard Air Station and surrounding areas. Since 1943, the U.S. Navy has conducted industrial operations on site using oils, lubricants, paint, gasoline and volatile solvents. Improper handling, direct dumping and spills contaminated site groundwater. In 1980, residents near the station reported well water contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. Working with the State of Michigan, the U.S. Coast Guard led cleanup activities, which included groundwater pumping and treatment. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2007, after groundwater met cleanup standards. The U.S. Coast Guard continues to use the site as a functioning air station. Off-site groundwater monitoring is ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 104 people and generated an estimated $620,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Bendix Corp./Allied Automotive

Entrance to the Bosch facility on the siteBendix Corp./Allied AutomotiveThe 20-acre Bendix Corp./Allied Automotive Superfund site is located in St. Joseph, Michigan. The Robert Bosch Corporation, the site’s current owner, operates a brake manufacturing facility on site. In the 1950s and 1960s, industrial activities included disposal of chemical waste in unlined lagoons. These waste handling practices resulted in groundwater contamination on site and off site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. EPA’s cleanup includes groundwater extraction, treatment and monitoring as well as soil vapor extraction and vapor phase treatment. Treatment and monitoring are ongoing. Institutional controls prohibit the use of groundwater in some contaminated areas. The brake manufacturing facility has remained in operation during cleanup; modern waste handling practices ensure the proper disposal of industrial byproducts.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 12 people and generated an estimated $63,827,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Butterworth #2 Landfill Alternative Energy Reuse Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse Green Infrastructure Reuse

A bicyclist on the bike trail at the siteButterworth #2 LandfillThe Butterworth #2 Landfill Superfund site is located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The site includes 120 acres along the Grand River. From 1950 to 1967, the City of Grand Rapids operated the landfill as an open dump and later as a sanitary landfill. Landfill operations contaminated groundwater and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. With EPA oversight, the site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) led cleanup activities. Cleanup included capping the landfill and installing groundwater monitoring wells. In 2002, the City of Grand Rapids began to discuss possible future uses for the site. To convert the area into a public recreation resource, the City of Grand Rapids worked with EPA on reuse plans that would ensure the protectiveness of the remedy and enable several recreational uses, including sports fields, walking and biking trails, and a skate park. The City held public meetings in 2005 and 2006 and continues to work with the community and recreation organizations on reuse planning. In 2009, the City extended a bike trail across the site. EPA and the City also worked together to allow site access for a local marathon. EPA has also worked with the City to evaluate the site’s capacity to support a solar energy facility; The solar redevelopment is currently on hold as the City is reevaluating their power needs for their wastewater treatment plant.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 15 people and generated an estimated $1,875,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Clare Water Supply Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse Green Infrastructure Reuse

The Clare Water Supply Superfund site is located in Clare, Michigan. The Clare water supply system draws groundwater from four municipal wells in the area. Operations at an adjacent industrial park contributed to the contamination. The presence of volatile organic compounds in two of the municipal wells led EPA to put the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included soil and groundwater treatment as well as deed and site access restrictions. Two 25-foot-tall air strippers have maintained a safe water supply since 1991. EPA and the community worked on a reuse assessment for the site. It identified potential redevelopment scenarios that could be compatible with the site’s use restrictions. These scenarios include commercial development and a pocket park that would connect both ends of the parcel via a landscaped walkway.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 56 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 460 people and generated an estimated $63,324,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Folkertsma Refuse Capped Site Reuse

The Folkertsma Refuse Superfund site is located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Beginning in the mid-1960s, a landfill on site accepted a variety of wastes, including foundry sand and construction debris. After changing ownership several times, the landfill closed in 1972 and a wood pallet business began operating at the site. An EPA investigation in 1984 found contamination in landfill materials, sediment and groundwater. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs) conducted cleanup activities at the site from 1991 to 1994. Cleanup included removal of contaminated sediment and its placement in the landfill. The PRPs put a clay cap over the landfill. The wood pallet repair and manufacturing business relocated to an on-site area north of the landfill. The relocation enabled the firm to continue to operate during and after cleanup. The business remains active on site. Site PRPs continue to conduct site inspections as well as groundwater and surface water monitoring.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 9 people and generated an estimated $190,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Grand Traverse Overall Supply Co. Cultural/Historical Reuse

The 1-acre Grand Traverse Overall Supply Co. Superfund site is located Greilickville, Michigan. A dry-cleaning business operated at the site from 1968 to 1987. Until 1977, site operators disposed of waste in a dry well and several lagoons on site, resulting in groundwater contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in December 1982. Since 2005, EPA has led cleanup activities, installing a soil vapor mitigation system at the Norris School next to the site, demolishing the on-site facility and removing contaminated soil. After completing soil cleanup, EPA installed a groundwater extraction and treatment system. EPA later enhanced the groundwater treatment by adding carbon, microorganisms and iron to promote breakdown of the contamination. In 2014, an arts organization purchased the site property and the adjacent Norris School for redevelopment as the Grand Traverse Recreational Art Center. Today, the Grand Traverse Regional Arts Campus, also known as Leelanau Studios, hosts artists, fitness and health studios, and other local businesses.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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H. Brown Co., Inc. Capped Site Reuse

The 4-acre H. Brown Co., Inc. Superfund site is located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. From 1961 to 1981, the H. Brown Company owned and operated a metals reclamation facility at the site. Operations included lead reclamation from wet-cell batteries. Between 1961 and 1978, site operators disposed of liquid waste materials directly onto the ground. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1998, a developer signed a Prospective Purchaser Agreement (PPA) with EPA, enabling redevelopment opportunities to move forward. EPA designed the site’s cleanup plan so that it was compatible with construction of three warehouses, asphalt parking lots and landscaped areas. By 1998, the developer had completed construction of a light industrial complex on site, returning it to productive use. Several businesses are located in the complex, which includes warehouses, office space and parking facilities.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 141 people and generated an estimated $71,729,154 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Hedblum Industries

The Hedblum Industries Superfund site, a former automotive parts manufacturing plant, is located one mile southwest of Oscoda, Michigan. Between 1968 and 1972, disposal practices led to soil and groundwater contamination with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Initial cleanup included soil excavation and groundwater extraction and treatment. In 2012, the potentially responsible party (PRP) installed a 24-well groundwater circulation system combined with a three-well soil vapor extraction system. EPA monitors treatment of contaminated groundwater and evaluates any potential soil vapor issues. Institutional controls restrict use of groundwater to help protect public health. The current site owner, an aircraft tool supply company, has operated on site since 1985, chiefly as a parts distribution warehouse.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 21 people and generated an estimated $2,500,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Hi-Mill Manufacturing Co.

The 4.5-acre Hi-Mill Manufacturing Co. Superfund site is located in Highland Township, Michigan. From 1946 to the mid-1980s, Hi-Mill Manufacturing Company made aluminum, brass and copper tubing parts and fittings, mainly for the refrigeration industry on site. Site activities resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater. Under Michigan Department of Natural Resources oversight, the company removed contaminated sludge, soil and wastewater from the site in 1983. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Cleanup activities include groundwater monitoring and deed restrictions prohibiting the use of groundwater. Hi-Mill Manufacturing Company began groundwater sampling and monitoring in 1994. After the company went out of business, EPA and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality ensured institutional controls were in place and are coordinating ongoing operation and maintenance activities at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Kaydon Corp.

The 40-acre Kaydon Corp. Superfund site is located in Muskegon, Michigan. White Motors Company produced engine blocks on site until 1941, when Kaydon Corporation acquired the site. Kaydon Corporation manufactures bearings, ball bearings and various bearing assemblies at the site. Wastewater disposal practices contaminated soil, sludge and groundwater. In 1984, Kaydon Corporation began cleanup activities. The company removed contaminated soil and sludge and took it to an off-site facility for disposal. In 1988, the company installed a pump-and-treat system to mitigate groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Ongoing investigations continue to identify additional areas of contamination. As needed, Kaydon Corporation conducts required cleanup activities. Kaydon Corporation continued manufacturing operations during cleanup and remains active at the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 160 people and generated an estimated $710,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Kent City Mobile Home Park

The 2-acre Kent City Mobile Home Park Superfund site is located in Kent City, Michigan. In 1982, the Michigan Department of Public Health (MDPH) identified hazardous compounds in well water samples at the mobile home park. EPA identified the source of contamination as buried 55-gallon drums from a former dry cleaning business. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. With the assistance of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDPH), the mobile home park owner removed the buried drums and surrounding soil. MDPH then closely monitored groundwater and private wells nearby. After determining that the site no longer posed a threat to human health and the environment, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1995. Kent City residents continue to live in the mobile home park.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 2 people and generated an estimated $120,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Kentwood Landfill Capped Site Reuse

A view of the Kentwood (Richard L. Root) Branch LibraryKentwood LandfillThe 72-acre Kentwood Landfill Superfund site is located in Kentwood, Michigan. Landfill operations from the 1950s to 1976 led to soil and groundwater contamination. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The City of Kentwood and Kent County worked with EPA to collect and treat groundwater, install a passive gas ventilation system, maintain the landfill cap and enforce groundwater use restrictions. Cleanup finished in 1995. The local governments also worked with EPA to identify future uses for the site that would be compatible with the remedy. The City of Kentwood developed plans for a new public library. In August 2010, Kent District Library opened a 46,000-square-foot, two-story facility on site. The Kentwood Branch Library is named after Richard L. Root, former mayor of Kentwood. In 2012, the City of Kentwood worked with EPA to update land use restrictions and agreements to allow for on-site storage of inert materials that do not disturb the landfill cover. In 2015, Kent County installed an active gas ventilation system to ensure that landfill gas does not migrate, ensuring the safe use of the library and other nearby buildings. The County expanded this system in 2017. Kentwood Farmer's Market operates seasonally on site, providing a place for local vendors to sell food and goods.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 28 people and generated an estimated $583,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Kysor Industrial Corp.

The Kysor Industrial Corp. Superfund site is located in the Cadillac Industrial Park in Cadillac, Michigan. Since 1959, Kysor Industrial Corporation has been operating an automotive parts plant on site. Operators dumped barrels of spent solvent and degreaser directly onto the ground behind the plant, resulting in soil and groundwater contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included removal and treatment of contaminated soil and groundwater extraction and treatment. This remedy also addresses groundwater contamination from the nearby Northernaire Plating Superfund site, which shares the groundwater table with the Kysor Industrial Corp. Superfund site. Groundwater treatment is ongoing for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Operators discharge treated groundwater into the Clam River. Land use controls prevent the use of contaminated groundwater as a drinking water source. EPA, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and the City of Cadillac are revising municipal ordinances to strengthen these land use controls. The Kysor Corporation continues to operate its automotive parts manufacturing plant on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 29 people and generated an estimated $54,836,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Lower Ecorse Creek Dump Athletic Fields Reuse

Playground at the siteLower Ecorse Creek DumpThe Lower Ecorse Creek Dump Superfund site includes six residential blocks on the bank of the Ecorse River in Wyandotte, Michigan, 6 miles southwest of Detroit. Prior to development, the area was wetlands, which developers filled in with waste material. In 1989, a local resident reported that he had exposed blue-stained soil during excavation work for a new driveway. The resident also reported blue material on several nearby lots and blue material seeping into the basement of his home. The blue color in the soil resulted from contamination. EPA immediately covered contaminated soil with clean top soil to protect human health and the environment. In 1994, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA removed the stained soil and cleaned up and repaired impacted homes. EPA finished removal and restoration activities at the residential portion of the site in 2000. In 2001, EPA conducted additional cleanup activities at a 1-acre neighborhood park. EPA continues to monitor and maintain the soil cover over the park to make sure the area remains safe for continued use. The park includes a playground, swing set, pavilion, basketball court and grass-covered open space for general recreational use. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2005. In 2006, commercial redevelopment of the Oak Street portion of the site began. Most of the site remains in residential use.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Metal Working Shop

The 2-acre Metal Working Shop Superfund site is located in Lake Ann, Michigan. From 1974 to 1977, a metal finishing workshop operated on site. Shop operators dumped rinse waters from the metal working process on the ground. These disposal practices threatened groundwater quality in surrounding residential areas. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990 and conducted extensive groundwater and surface soil testing. The results showed that the contaminant concentrations were not high enough to pose a threat to human health and the environment. As a result, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1992. Currently, most of the site is a designated forest; woodworking occurs on a small part of the site. In 2000, the Lake Ann Camp and Retreat Center purchased the site property.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Northernaire Plating

The 13-acre Northernaire Plating Superfund site is located in the Cadillac Industrial Park in Cadillac, Michigan. From 1971 to 1981, Northernaire operated an electroplating facility on site and used metal in its industrial processes. Through improper handling and faulty sewer lines, hazardous metals, namely chromium, leaked into soil and groundwater. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA immediately removed chemical containers, drums and sewer lines. In 1995, EPA facilitated other cleanup activities, including installation and operation of an extensive groundwater extraction and treatment system, new discharge piping and a soil vapor extraction system. The remedy also addresses groundwater contamination from the nearby Kysor Industrial Corporation Superfund site. The remedy has achieved cleanup goals for the Northernaire Plating site. Remedial systems continue to operate to clean up volatile organic compounds from groundwater at the Kysor Industrial Corporation site. No restrictions are necessary to protect human health or the environment from chromium. As a result, EPA is working to take the site off the NPL. A trucking company currently owns the facility.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Organic Chemicals, Inc.

A truck parking at the siteOrganic Chemicals, Inc.The 5-acre Organic Chemicals, Inc. Superfund site is located in Grandville, Michigan. Several petroleum-related industries operated on site from 1941 to 1991. Chemical spills and leaking waste lagoons contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup workers installed a groundwater extraction and treatment system and removed contaminated soil. In 2006, a Grandville-based trucking company purchased the site property. The company currently parks trucks on the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 20 people and generated an estimated $1,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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PMC Groundwater

The trail and residences on the sitePMC GroundwaterThe PMC Groundwater Superfund site is located on the shores of Lake Michigan’s Little Traverse Bay in Petoskey, Michigan. The Petoskey Manufacturing Company (PMC) operated a die casting plant at the site. Improper disposal practices contaminated area groundwater, soil and the town’s municipal well. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included removing contaminated soil and the contaminated well, and monitoring groundwater. Deed restrictions limit the future use of the groundwater. EPA, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, the City of Petoskey and local developers worked together on cleanup and redevelopment planning for the site and surrounding waterfront. This collaboration and the City’s visionary efforts and creative financing strategies transformed the site. Today, it supports residential and commercial areas and a recreational waterfront. Site uses also include condominiums with integrated all-underground utilities, an improved road, parking and a lakefront bicycle path. In 2017, EPA conducted a vapor intrusion investigation at the condominium redevelopment on the former PMC property. EPA is installing vapor mitigation systems in all units with indoor air results above health-based standards. EPA is planning to expand the investigation into the surrounding neighborhood.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 9 people and generated an estimated $522,391 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Roto-Finish Co., Inc.

The 7-acre Roto-Finish Co., Inc. Superfund site is located in Portage, Michigan. From 1950 to 1988, the company made equipment and mechanical parts on site. Operators discharged wastewater into several lagoons. From 1979 to 1984, the Roto-Finish Company excavated the lagoons and removed surface soils. Cleanup also included disposal of excavated materials and placement of clean material in excavated areas. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Long-term monitoring is ongoing. Groundwater use restrictions are in place until groundwater meets drinking water standards. Clark Logic uses the site for commercial warehousing. A law group and a brand management company also operate on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 7 people and generated an estimated $149,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Shiawassee River

The Shiawassee River Superfund site spans eight miles of the Shiawassee River. The Cast Forge Company operated an aluminum casting facility in Howell, Michigan, from 1969 to 1973. The company released contaminated wastewater from on-site lagoons to the Shiawassee River and surrounding wetlands. These activities contaminated soils, lagoons and the river. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cast Forge Company filled in the lagoons and removed contaminated soils. The company also provided funding for restoration activities, such as dredging, on the southern part of the Shiawassee River. EPA completed cleanup activities in 2005. Efforts included issuing a fish advisory for the area to discourage fish consumption. Currently, several businesses are active on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 18 people and generated an estimated $2,155,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Tar Lake

A walking and biking trail winding through the Tar Lake siteTar LakeThe 189-acre Tar Lake Superfund site surrounds a dry 4-acre pond in Mancelona Township, Michigan. From 1882 until 1945, Antrim Iron Company operated an iron works facility that disposed of wastes in the pond, referred to as Tar Lake. Disposal practices resulted in groundwater contamination. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included removal of tar waste and contaminated soil as well as containment and treatment of groundwater. EPA took the 45-acre Eastern Tailings Area (ETA) of the site off the NPL in 2005, after completing cleanup. In 2009, Mancelona Renewable Resources (MRR) purchased a 115-acre portion of the site, including the ETA area. In 2011, EPA took the remaining 75-acre portion of the site purchased by MRR off the NPL. MRR considered constructing a biomass alternative energy facility on site. Community Resources Development (CRD), a nonprofit agency, owns 54 acres of the site. EPA and MDEQ have been working with CRD and a railroad company to support the redevelopment of 24 acres of CRD’s property next to Route 131 for industrial use. In 2014, Great Lakes Central Railroad purchased 5 acres of CRD’s property. Commercial businesses also operate on site and a municipal wood waste storage area is located on site. MDEQ continues to operate the site’s groundwater treatment system and conduct groundwater monitoring.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed one person and generated an estimated $184,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Torch Lake Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

Torch LakeTorch LakeThe 2,700-acre Torch Lake Superfund site is located on Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula, within the Torch Lake Area of Concern. The site includes lakes, ponds, waterways and tailing piles. From the 1890s until 1969, copper mining activities included the deposition of mine wastes into surrounding soil and surface water, resulting in soil, surface water and groundwater contamination. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA’s cleanup activities included cap construction, slag removal activities and habitat restoration. EPA took parts of the site off the NPL in 2002, 2004, 2012 and 2013 as cleanup goals were met. EPA continues to provide oversight for site monitoring efforts by the State of Michigan and the local community. Area municipalities continue to operate well fields and sewage lagoons on site. Habitat restoration activities on Torch Lake’s Gull Island included the construction of a recreation area with nature trails and a campground, and an outreach and monitoring program that introduces high school students to biodiversity and soil fertility studies. Residential redevelopment on the Hubbell/Tamarck City portion of the site is underway. Redevelopment has resulted in several residential developments on site, including the communities of Isle-Royale, Dollar Bay, Mason Sands and Point Mills. EPA has also worked closely with the National Park Service, the Keweenaw National Historical Park Advisory Commission, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Franklin Township and local partners to support the return of a 25-acre portion of the site known as Quincy Smelter, located in Keweenaw National Historical Park, to be recognized as part of the Quincy Mining Company National Historic Landmark. EPA took the Quincy Smelter portion of the site off the NPL in 2013. Reuse plans for the area include historical tours of the landmark, the best-preserved copper smelter in the country, and a waterfront recreation area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 7 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 44 people and generated an estimated $4,351,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Velsicol Burn Pit

The 5-acre Velsicol Burn Pit Superfund site is located in St. Louis, Michigan. Between 1956 and 1970, the Michigan Chemical Corporation, later known as the Velsicol Chemical Corporation (Velsicol), operated on site. Operators burned and industrial waste products and pesticides and disposed of the materials at the facility. Industrial waste and pesticides contaminated area groundwater and surface soils. After EPA proposed listing the site on the National Priorities List (NPL), Velsicol removed contaminated soil. EPA placed the site on the NPL in March 2010. EPA selected the site’s long-term remedy in 2015. Cleanup planning for thermal treatment of soils is underway. A neighboring golf club currently uses the former burn area as an out-of-bounds area for their golf course. EPA makes sure that workers, golfers and visitors have little to no contact with contaminated soil and groundwater.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Velsicol Chemical Corp. (Michigan) Capped Site Reuse Green Infrastructure Reuse

The Velsicol Chemical Corp. (Michigan) Superfund site is located in St. Louis, Michigan. Since 1936, the Michigan Chemical Corp. (now known as Velsicol) produced chemical products, including pesticides, at the 54-acre facility. After years of poor waste management practices, the facility shut down in 1977. Site investigations found pesticides in soil and groundwater. Site discharges also contaminated surrounding properties, including residential homes and the Pine River. A fish advisory prevents consumption of fish. In 1982, Velsicol entered into an agreement with EPA and the State of Michigan to build a cap and slurry wall around the facility to prevent further migration of contaminants. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1983. EPA and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality collected groundwater, sediment and fish tissue samples to determine the extent of contamination. Cleanup activities completed include the removal of sediments from the Pine River and cleanup of contaminated soils in a residential area. Design activities are underway for the cleanup of soils and groundwater at the former chemical plant site. EPA is also funding the replacement of the City of St. Louis’ municipal drinking water supply. This project is nearly complete. Residential use on part of the site is ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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