An official website of the United States government.

We've made some changes to EPA.gov. If the information you are looking for is not here, you may be able to find it on the EPA Web Archive or the January 19, 2017 Web Snapshot.

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Minnesota

If you are having trouble viewing the map in your browser, click the 'View larger map' link below


Adrian Municipal Well Field Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Adrian Municipal Well Field Superfund site includes two municipal wells in Adrian, Minnesota. The State of Minnesota closed the contaminated wells and dug two new wells outside the area of contamination in 1984 and 1985. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA investigations identified nine leaking underground storage tanks as potential contamination sources. In 1989, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency completed cleanup activities. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1992. The well field continues to provide water for the municipal water supply.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:


Arrowhead Refinery Co.

The warehouse on the siteArrowhead Refinery Co.The 10-acre Arrowhead Refinery Co. Superfund site is a former waste oil recycling facility near Duluth International Airport in Hermantown, Minnesota. From 1961 to 1977, Arrowhead Refinery Company re-refined oil on the property. Site operators disposed of waste in a wetland and a wastewater ditch. These practices resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup included removal and proper disposal of sludge, filter cake and contaminated soil as well as groundwater treatment. The site is zoned for commercial uses. In 2010, EPA supported a reuse assessment to assist the property owner and local government in evaluating reuse opportunities for the site. A warehouse operates next to the site. In 2015, a developer with plans for commercial development purchased the site property.
Last updated February 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Baytown Township Ground Water Plume

The Baytown Township Ground Water Plume Superfund site covers 7 square miles in Washington County, Minnesota. It consists of a contaminated groundwater plume and its source area. From 1940 to 1968, a metalworking facility used the source area property. Facility activities contaminated groundwater. In 1987, the Minnesota Department of Health detected contamination in private wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Cleanup activities, managed by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, include well water treatment and treatment of source area groundwater. Land above the groundwater plume includes farmland, rural residences, a commercial building, Lake Elmo Airport and developed areas of the City of Bayport. A convenience store and a gas station are currently located on the source area property.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 48 people and generated an estimated $9,093,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Boise Cascade/Onan Corp./Medtronics, Inc. Capped Site Reuse Pollinator Habitat Reuse

Light industrial/office spaceBoise Cascade/Onan Corp./Medtronics, Inc.The 183-acre Boise Cascade/Onan Corp./Medtronics, Inc. Superfund site is located in Fridley, Minnesota. From 1921 to 1961, a wood treatment facility was active on site. In the early 1960s, Onan Corporation purchased 133 acres of the site property and Medtronic Corporation purchased the remaining 50 acres to build commercial and industrial manufacturing facilities. In 1979, site investigations found toxic chemicals from past wood-treating operations in soil and groundwater. In 1984, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup included removal of contaminated soil and backfilling with clean soil, containment of remaining contaminated waste and soil, groundwater treatment, and collection and disposal of thousands of gallons of oil. Cleanup finished in 1992. Medtronic Corporation built its office building and parking lot on the western part of the site. Cummins (formerly Onan Corporation) built an office building, manufacturing facility and parking lots on the eastern part of the site. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1995. In 1999, site workers identified contamination in soil on the Onan property during construction of the Murphy Warehouse building. The site’s potentially responsible parties removed drums and contaminated soil from the area and monitored groundwater for two years. In 2009, investigations by Cummins prior to construction of a new generator test cell facility identified soil contamination. Cummins cleaned up the soil and then built the facility. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. The 11-acre prairie habitat at the on-site business branch has been planted with wildflowers that support pollinators. The area is home to birds, rabbits, deer and foxes.
Last updated October 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 3,021 people and generated an estimated $941,804,142 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Doc's Auto Salvage Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Doc’s Auto Salvage Superfund site is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. An auto service station and scrap yard operated on site until 1995. From the mid-1970s until the early 1990s, site operators illegally discharged contaminated stormwater and disposed of contaminated wastes. In 1997, the State of Minnesota placed the site on the state’s Superfund list. EPA did not place the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1998, EPA awarded Hennepin County a grant for environmental assessment and cleanup activities. EPA worked with Hennepin County to accelerate site cleanup, enabling the locality to take the lead on cleanup and redevelopment efforts. EPA and the county removed over 3,000 tons of contaminated soil from the site. In 2000, the community held a groundbreaking ceremony to celebrate construction of a $3 million control center for the Metro Transit of North Minneapolis. The control center, used for bus and light rail, opened in 2002.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


East Bethel Demolition Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Native grasses now grow on the Site to augment the crane environmentEast Bethel Demolition LandfillThe 60-acre East Bethel Demolition Landfill Superfund site is located in East Bethel Township, Minnesota. The landfill covers 27 acres of the site; it accepted demolition debris and other hazardous industrial wastes during the 1970s. In 1981, Anoka County identified high levels of contaminants and dissolved metals in the groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup actions, managed by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s (MPCA’s) Closed Landfill Program, included groundwater extraction and treatment, a new landfill cap, and active gas venting. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996. MPCA currently maintains the site. MPCA has planted native grasses on part of the area to enhance wildlife habitat for sandhill cranes; much of the site is part of the Sandhill Crane Natural Area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


FMC Corp. (Fridley Plant) Alternative Energy Reuse Green Remediation Reuse

Model airplanes laid on the grass at the FMC Corp. siteFMC Corp. (Fridley Plant)The 18-acre FMC Corp. (Fridley Plant) Superfund site is located in Anoka County, Minnesota. From the 1940s to 1969, operations on site generated wastes. Operators disposed of these wastes in an on-site dump. Sampling in the early 1980s found solvent contamination in groundwater, surface water and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Contaminated groundwater from the site migrated into the Mississippi River, affecting the Minneapolis drinking water system. Cleanup included the excavation and storage of contaminated soil in an on-site vault and groundwater pumping and treatment. FMC Corporation (now BAE Systems Land and Armaments, or BAE) completed the most cleanup activities in 1987. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. Part of the site is located in the River Road Industrial Center, also known as the BAE Facility. The 18-acre area includes 5 acres purchased by Burlington Northern Railroad in 1969 and a 13-acre area operated by BAE that includes open space and the site’s containment and groundwater treatment facility. Through a partnership with the Academy of Aeronautics (AMA), EPA worked with the site owner and a local AMA club, the Minneapolis Piston Poppers. The club used the site for aeromodelling for several years. In 2005, Environmental Liability Transfer, Inc. purchased the BAE Facility, including part of the site. In 2009, BAE installed a 14.7-kilowatt solar panel system to generate electrical power for the site’s remedy. The system provides 30 percent of the energy needed to power the site’s remedial systems. The use of solar energy also prevents carbon dioxide from being produced and emitted into the air.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 12 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 400 people and generated an estimated $229,096,022 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Fridley Commons Park Well Field Athletic Fields Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

A photograph of the playground at Fridley Commons ParkFridley Commons Park Well FieldThe Fridley Commons Park Well Field Superfund site is located in Fridley, Minnesota. The site consists of an active 50-acre well field with eight public wells owned by the City of Fridley. In 1981, the City identified contamination in groundwater samples from municipal wells. The City was unable to identify the source of the contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Cleanup activities included monitoring groundwater contamination and decommissioning the ninth well, where sampling showed the highest contamination. Since contaminant levels have improved over the years, the ninth well has returned to use. In addition to the active well field, Fridley Commons Park is located on site. It features three baseball fields, tennis courts, a sliding hill, an open field, a playground, a warming house and parking facilities.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


General Mills/Henkel Corp.

Sign for the East Hennepin Small Business Center on the General Mills Henkel Corp. siteGeneral Mills/Henkel Corp.The General Mills/Henkel Corp. Superfund site is located on East Hennepin Avenue in Minneapolis, Minnesota. General Mills used the area as a food research facility beginning in 1930. From 1947 to 1977, the company also used the site for chemical research. Waste disposal operations between 1947 and 1962 contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. In 1984, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The site’s potentially responsible party led groundwater treatment and other cleanup activities, with oversight provided by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. A private investment group purchased the site property in 1989 and worked to transform the area into a business incubator enterprise development zone that supports the startup and growth of local small businesses. A variety of businesses currently operate at the site. Vapor intrusion mitigation and groundwater monitoring are ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 51 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 166 people and generated an estimated $14,548,465 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Joslyn Manufacturing & Supply Co.

Caribou Coffee on the Joslyn Manufacturing & Supply Co. siteJoslyn Manufacturing & Supply Co.The 30-acre Joslyn Manufacturing & Supply Co. Superfund site is located in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota. Beginning in the 1920s and ending in 1980, a succession of companies operated a wood-treating facility on site. The companies placed wastes in waste disposal ponds, buried sludge on site and spilled wood-treating solutions onto the ground. These practices contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Site cleanup under Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) oversight began in 1988. Cleanup activities included removal, treatment and disposal of contaminated soil for the majority of the site. Cleanup also includes ongoing groundwater treatment and removal of dense non-aqueous-phase liquids. In 2017, MPCA proposed a cleanup plan for remaining soil contamination. EPA, state agencies and Real Estate Recycling (RER), a company specializing in redevelopment of once-contaminated lands, worked together to support reuse outcomes at the site. RER purchased the site property, continued cleanup and then redeveloped the area into the Twin Lakes Business Park. RER recognized that the property’s size, valuable infrastructure and direct access to highways as well as the strength of Brooklyn Center’s labor force all represented significant business opportunities. In 2002, EPA took the redeveloped portion of the site off the NPL. Today, the business park provides 421,000 square feet of commercial and industrial space for a variety of tenants.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 328 people and generated an estimated $271,332,212 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Koch Refining Co./N-Ren Corp.

Industrial facilities at the siteKoch Refining Co./N-Ren Corp.The Koch Refining Co./N-Ren Corp. Superfund site is an active oil refinery in Rosemount, Minnesota. The 1,200-acre area includes the refinery and a neighboring property. Operations began in 1955. The refinery receives crude oil by pipeline and barge and then refines the crude oil into gasoline, jet fuel, heating oil, kerosene, diesel fuel, boiler fuel, asphalt, petroleum coke, sulfur, carbon dioxide, butane and propane. Since the early 1970s, spills in the storage tank area have occurred. Site investigations found groundwater contamination. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup took place from 1988 to 2004. Cleanup involved installation of recovery wells, groundwater gradient control and soil gas extraction. Further studies classified the area as a petroleum release site so EPA transferred site responsibilities to the Minnesota Tanks and Spills Program. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1995. It became a state-lead site under EPA’s Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) program and Underground Storage Tank (UST) program. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. The oil refinery continues to operate on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 1,200 people and generated an estimated $1,200,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Koppers Coke

The Energy Technology Center at the Koppers Coke siteKoppers CokeThe 38-acre Koppers Coke Superfund site is located in Saint Paul, Minnesota. From 1917 to 1979, the Koppers Company produced foundry coke and various byproducts such as coal tars and coal tar distillates. Storage and disposal practices, as well as various leaks and spills, resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA delegated cleanup authority to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). As part of the cleanup, MPCA required that the Koppers Company dispose of residues and contaminated soil at an off-site facility. The site’s location next to major ongoing industrial and commercial development and its proximity to transportation infrastructure spurred the Saint Paul Port Authority to position the site for redevelopment. The Authority redeveloped the site as part of a 218-acre high-tech industrial park called Energy Park. The facility, established in 1980, includes manufacturing facilities, commercial and office space, and housing. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 15 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 507 people and generated an estimated $128,133,808 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Kurt Manufacturing Co.

Entrance to Kurt Manufacturing Plant on the siteKurt Manufacturing Co.The 10-acre Kurt Manufacturing Co. Superfund site is located in Fridley, Minnesota. Since 1960, Kurt Manufacturing has made machining and metal components on site. Operators spilled industrial solvents into a drainage pit beneath the company’s metal shavings bin storage. This spill contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup activities included soil and groundwater treatment. EPA also required land use controls to limit access to site groundwater and soils. Kurt Manufacturing continues to operate its precision machining and metal fabrication facility on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 175 people and generated an estimated $46,524,390 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


LaGrand Sanitary Landfill Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 70-acre LaGrand Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located in LaGrand Township, Minnesota. The landfill itself covers 5 acres. Between 1974 and 1984, the landfill accepted municipal and industrial wastes. Landfill wastes contaminated groundwater below the landfill. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) addressed the site through the state’s Closed Landfill Program. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup began in 1992. Workers conducted long-term groundwater monitoring, landfill gas venting and landfill cover maintenance. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1997. In 2006, MPCA installed a new landfill cap and gas vents. In 2008, MPCA transferred 3 acres of the site property to Runestone Electric for reuse as an electric substation. In 2009, MPCA granted an easement to Great River Energy, an electrical company serving Minnesota and Wisconsin, for electrical power transmission lines to cross part of the site. In 2013, MPCA developed a Closed Landfill Use Plan for the site property and transmitted it to Douglas County. The plan outlines the property’s current use as a closed landfill and potential future use as a solar farm.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


MacGillis & Gibbs Co./Bell Lumber & Pole Co. Capped Site Reuse

Office buildings at the New Brighton Corporate Park III on the MacGillis & Gibbs Co. siteMacGillis & Gibbs Co./Bell Lumber & Pole Co.The 68-acre MacGillis & Gibbs Co./Bell Lumber & Pole Co. Superfund site consists of two adjoining properties in New Brighton, Minnesota. Wood preserving facilities operated on both properties through most of the 20th century. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984, after discovery of contaminated soil and groundwater. Cleanup activities included stabilization and removal of contaminated soil, bio-treatment of contaminated soil, capping of heavily contaminated soils, and groundwater pumping and treatment. By 2001, most cleanup operations were finished. For more than two decades, the City of New Brighton laid the groundwork necessary for redevelopment of the 25-acre MacGillis & Gibbs property. This effort was part of the City’s plan to revitalize a historic road that was once a main route through the Twin Cities of Saint Paul and Minneapolis. In 1997, the City, along with state and federal agencies, successfully negotiated a Prospective Purchaser Agreement to resolve the City’s liability concerns prior to its acquisition of the property. The site’s successful cleanup made possible the development of the 32-acre New Brighton Corporate Park III. Today, the redevelopment project includes manufacturing and distribution businesses as well as over 70,000 square feet of commercial office space, retail shops and restaurants, legal and medical services, a post office and an adjacent 120-unit condominium development.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 11 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 467 people and generated an estimated $96,782,632 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Morris Arsenic Dump Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Morris Arsenic Dump Superfund site is located in Morris, Minnesota. In the early 1940s, Stevens County buried surplus arsenic-based pesticide in a gravel pit on site. The Minnesota Department of Transportation built a highway through the gravel pit in 1978. After inconclusive groundwater and soil testing, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency requested assistance from EPA. EPA found traces of arsenic in groundwater samples and added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Further testing could not determine whether the arsenic in the groundwater came from buried pesticides or from arsenic found naturally in the region. Since tested arsenic concentrations fell within the naturally occurring arsenic level range, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1986. Part of U.S. Highway 59 remains in use on the site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


NL Industries/Taracorp/Golden Auto Capped Site Reuse

The asphalt cap used as a parking lotNL Industries/Taracorp/Golden AutoThe NL Industries/Taracorp/Golden Auto Superfund site is located in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. A secondary smelter operated on site from 1940 to 1982, recovering lead from lead plates, battery fragments and lead containers. Waste disposal activities at the smelter and the metal refining business resulted in high lead levels in the air, soil and groundwater. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup involved removing contaminated soil, refilling and revegetating the area, cleaning or demolishing buildings, and installing a protective asphalt cover. Restrictions limited access to the area during cleanup. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1998. Today, the site is home to the Highway 7 Business Center, which consists of an industrial/commercial office/warehouse building with associated parking, drive and green space areas. Real Estate Recycling and its development subsidiary, Highway 7 Business Center LLC, own the site property. Long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 86 people and generated an estimated $17,404,021 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Nutting Truck & Caster Co.

The 8.6-acre Nutting Truck & Caster Co. Superfund site is located in Faribault, Minnesota. Between 1891 and 1984, the Nutting Truck & Caster Company made and distributed casters, wheels, hand trucks and towline trucks at the site. From 1959 to 1979, the company operated a foundry waste disposal area on site, using a seepage pit for disposal of waste and sludges. These activities contaminated surface soil. In 1980, the company removed waste materials and contaminated soil from the pit and then backfilled and paved the area. In 1984, the company ended its operations at the site. EPA also placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. EPA delegated authority to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to oversee the cleanup. Follow-on investigations identified groundwater contamination resulting from former disposal practices. Cleanup activities included the construction of a groundwater extraction and treatment system, which operated until 2004. Prairie Avenue Leasing Ltd. currently owns the site property and leases it for commercial and light industrial uses. Groundwater monitoring is complete. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2017.
Last updated February 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 68 people and generated an estimated $5,719,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Oakdale Dump

The Oakdale Dump Superfund site is located in Oakdale, Minnesota. The site consists of three properties – the 55-acre Abresch property, the 5-acre Brockman property and the 2-acre Eberle property. In the 1940s and 1950s, industrial and non-industrial waste dumping took place at the three properties. In 1980, a Minnesota Pollution Control Agency investigation identified contamination in soils at the three properties. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included the removal of contaminated soil and waste, treatment of soil, and collection and off-site treatment of contaminated water. A wooded vacant lot is located on the Brockman property. The Eberle property is now a city park. Active groundwater treatment is ongoing at the Abresch property. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing site wide.
Last updated September 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Olmsted County Sanitary Landfill Alternative Energy Reuse Capped Site Reuse

The Olmsted County Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located in Oronoco, Minnesota. The City of Rochester owned and operated the 50-acre area from 1972 to 1984, when Olmstead County purchased the property. The landfill accepted various industrial wastes, including electroplating sludge, asbestos, transformers, paint and solvents. Seeps from the landfill resulted in groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The County led site investigations from 1989 to 1993 under Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) oversight. In 1994, the County capped the landfill and installed a leachate collection system. MPCA’s Closed Landfill Program adequately addressed site risks. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1995. A local model aeronautics club has been operating a flying field for model airplanes on site since 2008.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Perham Arsenic Site Capped Site Reuse

The Perham Arsenic Site Superfund site is located in Perham, Minnesota. From the 1930s until 1947, manufacture of an arsenic pesticide to control grasshoppers that threatened crops throughout the Midwest took place on site. Site disposal practices contaminated groundwater. In 1971, Hammers Construction Company purchased the site property to build offices and a warehouse. The company installed a groundwater well to provide water to the facility. Eleven employees suffered from arsenic poisoning after drinking the contaminated groundwater. In response to this discovery, the City of Perham extended its municipal water supply to the facility and capped the well. The cleanup response included capping of an arsenic burial pit and installation of a groundwater treatment system. The City supplied water to a nearby school and residence. Land use controls protect human health and safety. Continued uses on site include the offices of Hammers Construction Company as well as fairground areas. Hammers Rental Properties currently owns the eastern portion of the site property. Knuttila Financial Services owns the western portion of the property. EPA classified the site as Sitewide Ready for Anticipated Use (SWRAU) in 2010. Long-term monitoring and groundwater recovery and treatment are ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 7 people and generated an estimated $1,630,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Pine Bend Sanitary Landfill Alternative Energy Reuse Capped Site Reuse

Browning-Ferris Industries (BFI) Waste Systems sign at the Pine Bend Sanitary Landfill sitePine Bend Sanitary LandfillThe 255-acre Pine Bend Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located in Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota. The site includes the largest open landfill in Minnesota; it opened in 1971. The landfill continues to operate on a portion of the site as a solid waste facility. Investigations identified groundwater contamination at the site and in several private wells. This contamination resulted from leachate migrating from the landfill. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. The site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) connected all residents to the public water supply and permanently sealed and abandoned private wells. The PRP also installed a low permeability cover, a landfill gas collection system, and a surface water and leachate collection system. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1998. A landfill gas collection system actively channels landfill gases to the site’s gas-to-energy production plant. The landfill continues to operate as a municipal solid waste facility in accordance with permit requirements.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 36 people and generated an estimated $10,401,030 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Reilly Tar & Chemical Corp. (St. Louis Park Unit) Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Soccer goals on a soccer field on the Reilly Tar & Chemical Corp. siteReilly Tar & Chemical Corp. (St. Louis Park Plant)The 80-acre Reilly Tar & Chemical Corp. (St. Louis Park Plant) Superfund site is located in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. From 1917 to 1982, a coal tar distillation and wood-preserving facility operated on site. Wastewater handling practices resulted in soil and groundwater contamination at the site. In 1972, site owners sold the site and residential and recreational redevelopment began. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL). EPA, the state and the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP) conducted cleanup activities. A responsible party addressed contamination in two on-site storage wells and filled an affected wetland. They also installed groundwater extraction and treatment systems for several aquifers and installed treatment systems for affect City drinking water wells. Since completing investigation activities for the source area, most of the site has operated as a city park. The City of St. Louis Park completed a major improvement project at the park in 2002. In 2003, the City added a new soil cover over the ball fields at the Louisiana Oaks Park on site. Rental condominium and apartment complexes, as well as commercial businesses, are located at the site. Parties completed construction of a commercial building and a road improvement project in 2004. Additional road improvement projects have occurred since that time, including a major improvement to Highway 7. Currently, the City of St. Louis Park operates and maintains groundwater pumping and treatment systems and monitors groundwater quality.
Last updated October 2015

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 13 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 135 people and generated an estimated $16,998,143 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


South Andover Site Capped Site Reuse

The Target building on the siteSouth Andover SiteThe 50-acre South Andover Site Superfund site is located in Andover, Minnesota. From 1954 to 1981, waste disposal and salvage facilities operated on site. Spills and practices resulted in the contamination of soils and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included removal and treatment or off-site disposal of contaminated soils. The potentially responsible parties completed cleanup activities in 1994. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. In 1996 and 1997, the City of Andover bought the site property and led redevelopment efforts. Today, residential and commercial uses extend from the site onto neighboring properties. Most of this area is known as Andover Station. The pedestrian-oriented development fosters a more walkable and livable community. It also attracts shoppers and boosts the local tax base.
Last updated May 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 14 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 357 people and generated an estimated $14,337,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


South Minneapolis Residential Soil Contamination Site

The South Minneapolis Residential Soil Contamination Superfund site is located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The 1,480-acre site includes 3,500 residential properties as well as commercial, municipal and industrial areas. From 1938 to 1963, Reade Manufacturing operated an arsenic-based pesticide manufacturing facility at the site. During manufacturing, toxic arsenic became airborne and contaminated soils in surrounding neighborhoods. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2006. Cleanup activities included the excavation of contaminated soil and restoration of more than 600 properties. A commercial and light industrial facility currently operates on site. Medical and healthcare businesses are also active on site. Other businesses and homes in the area remain in use.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 183 people and generated an estimated $129,789,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


St. Louis River Site Capped Site Reuse

The 755-acre St. Louis River National Priorities List (NPL) Superfund site consists of two state Superfund sites – the St. Louis River/Interlake/Duluth Tar site (SLRIDT) and the U.S. Steel site. The sites are located near Duluth, Minnesota, along the St. Louis River. Industrial operations occurred at the SLRIDT site as early as the 1890s, with iron companies operating on site since 1904. Until 1948, tar and chemical companies manufactured substances from iron production byproducts at the SLRIDT site. U.S Steel operated manufacturing facilities from 1915 to 1979. Past operations and improper waste disposal practices at both sites contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater. Site operations also contaminated the St. Louis River, an estuary with abundant wildlife and fisheries. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984 and delegated authority for site management to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). Cleanup activities at SLRIDT included tar and soil removal, and dredging and capping of contaminated river sediments in Stryker Bay, Slip 6 and Slip 7. In 2016, EPA conducted a reuse assessment for the site. In 2017, MPCA clarified the site boundary to assist with further redevelopment efforts. In addition, MPCA reconstructed wetland habitats to help fish productivity and health. Parts of the site are currently used for a variety of light industry, manufacturing and materials storage. The Duluth city government supported the development of a light industrial park on and around the SLRIDT part of the site. The facility includes light manufacturing, transportation, storage and commercial businesses. Other parts of the site remain undeveloped. Cleanup activities at the U.S. Steel site included building demolition, and removal and solidification of large volumes of tar and contaminated soil. EPA, U.S. Steel and MPCA are working on a sediment cleanup and beneficial use improvement for Spirit Lake, a section of the St. Louis River next to the site.
Last updated February 2018

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 47 people and generated an estimated $2,107,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Union Scrap Iron & Metal Co.

View of cobbled parking lot with security fence at perimeter and limiting access to parking area beyondUnion Scrap Iron & Metal Co.The Union Scrap Iron & Metal Co. Superfund site is a 10,000-square-foot area in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Battery recycling operations took place on site from the early 1970s until 1983. Site operations and disposal practices resulted in contaminated wastes and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. From 1987 to 1989, EPA removed wastes, battery debris and contaminated soil from the site and replaced excavated areas with clean fill. EPA also decontaminated and demolished on-site buildings and removed contaminated material from the sewer lines. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1991. Today, the site is part of the North Washington Industrial Park. Commercial businesses use the site as a parking area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


University of Minnesota (Rosemount Research Center)

The University of Minnesota Rosemount Research Center (UMRRC) Superfund site is located in Rosemount, Minnesota. An agricultural research station was located on site. A former burn pit operated by the University of Minnesota resulted in the contamination of groundwater. Three university tenants – George’s Used Equipment, Porter Electric and Machine Company, and U.S. Transformed – disposed of wastes in three areas, resulting in soil contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup included groundwater treatment, soil treatment and disposal, and extension of a community water supply line. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2001. Today, a University of Minnesota research center is located on site. The site is also part of a larger area known as UMore Park East. Current land uses in UMore Park East include agricultural areas and various university operations.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Waite Park Wells Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Entrance to the 42.1-acre River’s Edge Park on the Waite Park Wells siteWaite Park WellsThe 200-acre Waite Park Wells Superfund site is located in the City of Waite Park and City of St. Cloud, Minnesota. The site currently includes two major areas – the Electric Machinery area and the Burlington Northern Car Shop area. Past land uses included a gas turbine and electric generator manufacturing facility and a railcar maintenance facility. Facility operations and waste disposal practices resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. In 1986, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency led the site’s cleanup. Cleanup activities included construction of a treatment facility for City of Waite Park municipal drinking water and ongoing monitoring of drinking water quality. Cleanup at the Electric Machinery area included groundwater extraction and treatment, limited soil vapor removal, and long-term groundwater monitoring. Cleanup at the Burlington Northern Car Shop area included removal of lagoon and sandblast wastes, construction of an on-site containment facility and groundwater monitoring. After the cleanup, Burlington Northern transferred ownership of 126 acres of the site to the City of Waite Park. The City has turned part of the area into River’s Edge Park. The park features baseball and softball fields, a batting cage, ice hockey and figure skating rinks, picnic tables, a concession stand, fishing access on the Sauk River, and parking. Redevelopment on another part of the site includes a warehouse, a restaurant and office buildings in West River Business Park. A foundry and parts casting business continues to use the former Electric Machinery building. The City of Waite Park expanded the water treatment plant, which continues to operate.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 43 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 604 people and generated an estimated $151,349,356 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page


Whittaker Corp.

Building 2 on the siteWhittaker Corp.The 7.5-acre Whittaker Corp. Superfund site is located in Hennepin County, Minnesota. Beginning in the 1940s, several industrial and manufacturing companies operated at the site. During World War II, a packaging facility for war materials, including antifreeze and oil for the military, operated on site. In the 1950s, operations expanded to include industrial coatings production and steel distribution. Site operators stored chemicals in aboveground and underground tanks on site and industrial processes generated a variety of wastes. Site operations and waste handling practices resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. In 1984, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA, the State and the site’s potentially responsible parties took precautionary measures during the cleanup to make sure on-site businesses could remain open. Cleanup activities included removal of soil, drums and tanks as well as groundwater extraction. After groundwater contaminants met cleanup goals, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1999. Today, a variety of commercial and industrial businesses remain active on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 17 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 83 people and generated an estimated $14,548,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

For more information:

Top of Page