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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in Missouri

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Annapolis Lead Mine Capped Site Reuse

The Annapolis Lead Mine Superfund site is located in Iron County, Missouri. The site spans a large area made up of historic mining areas, Sutton Branch Creek and its floodplain, and populated areas in the town of Annapolis. Massive piles of mining waste left on site eroded over time, resulting in lead contamination of soils, sediments and nearby bodies of water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2004. EPA worked with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services to develop a cleanup plan. The plan addressed contaminated sediments in the Sutton Branch Creek floodplain and contaminated soils in nearby residential yards. Workers collected contaminated materials, contained and capped them, and planted the area with native vegetation. EPA and MDNR also planted over 1,000 trees, revegetating portions of the site. Cleanup activities also stabilized portions of the creek and several homes in Annapolis. Cleanup construction finished in 2007. MDNR continues to monitor water quality at the site and conducts regular maintenance activities to ensure the remedy remains protective of human health and the environment.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Big River Mine Tailings/St. Joe Minerals Corp. Core Infrastructure Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

The Big River Mine Tailing/St. Joe Minerals Corps. Superfund site is located in Desloge, Missouri. The site is part of a former mining region about 70 miles south of St. Louis, often referred to as the "Old Lead Belt." From 1742 to 1972, mining operations resulted in enormous piles of mine waste tailings and chat on site. The site consists of eight large areas of mine waste and spans about 110 square miles. For example, St. Joe Minerals Corporation’s operations disposed of mine tailings across a 600-acre rural area bordered on three sides by the Big River. In 1977, heavy rains caused about 50,000 cubic yards of the Big River Mine Tailings Pile to slump into the Big River, contaminating surface water and soil with heavy metals. Local governments, businesses and citizens reused the mine waste as fill for construction projects and as agricultural amendments. Contaminants from the waste seeped into the Big River. After site investigations, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. The remedy includes mine waste removal and stabilization as well as use of passive bioreactors to treat dissolved zinc in groundwater seeps. EPA tests residential properties for heavy metals and replaces contaminated soil as needed. EPA also cleans up affected schools, day cares and parks. Continued site uses include residential areas, public service facilities and recreation areas. People use the Big River for recreation, fishing, canoeing and watering of livestock. The State of Missouri advises people not to eat fish they catch from the Big River downstream of contaminated areas. An industrial park and an active landfill are located on the National Lead sub-site. St. Joe State Park is located on the St. Joe Minerals Corporation sub-site. People visit the park to hike, camp, swim and ride off-road vehicles.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 1,000 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 10,746 people and generated an estimated $1,208,770,842 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Ellisville Site Capped Site Reuse

The Ellisville Superfund site is located in St. Louis County, Missouri. The site includes three disconnected properties, called operable units (OUs). The Rosalie property is OU1. The Bliss property is OU2. The Callahan property is OU3. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Site investigations in the 1980s discovered buried drums and contaminated soil at the Rosalie property. EPA removed contaminated soils and drums, backfilled with clean soil, and reseeded the area. The Bliss Waste Oil Company operated during the 1960s and 1970s at OU2 and disposed of wastes on site by dumping and burying drums. Cleanup for OU2 included removal of contaminated soil and either incinerating it or transporting it to a permitted landfill. Groundwater investigations are ongoing. After reports of buried drums were confirmed at the Callahan property in 1980, cleanup at OU3 included the removal of the drums and contaminated soil. After EPA disposed of contaminated soil at an off-site landfill, the area was backfilled with clean soil and reseeded. Land uses vary across the OUs. A developer purchased a small part of OU2 and the adjacent property for future residential use. A housing subdivision is located on OU1.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Minker/Stout/Romaine Creek

The Minker/Stout/Romaine Creek Superfund site includes about 10 acres of separate properties near Imperial, Missouri. In the early 1970s, site operators sprayed dioxin-contaminated oil on the Bubbling Springs Ranch horse arena to control dust. This resulted in the death of several horses. Dioxin-contaminated soil removed from the horse arena ended up as fill material in residential areas. These areas included the Minker, Stout, Cashel and Sullins residences. Much of the fill from the Minker residence eroded into Romaine Creek. In 1983, EPA detected dioxin in the soil on site and in Romaine Creek sediments. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983 and permanently relocated 11 families affected by the contamination. Between 1985 and 1989, EPA removed about 28,420 tons of soil at the Minker area, the Sullins and Cashel residences, Romaine Creek and the Stout area. EPA sent the contaminated soil off site for incineration in 1996 and 1997. The state temporarily relocated two other families during cleanup of the Minker area; they have since returned to their homes. The site remains in continued residential use.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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National Mine Tailings

The National Mine Tailings Superfund site is located in a former mining region known as the “Old Lead Belt,” about 70 miles south of St. Louis, Missouri. The site is part of the larger Big River Mine Tailings site, which includes seven large areas of mine waste and covers about 110 square miles. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Site cleanup included removing lead contamination and regrading and covering the removal area with clean fill. EPA worked with the potentially responsible parties and property owners to ensure the continued operation of site businesses at the Park Hills Industrial Park during cleanup. Today, several businesses are located at the industrial park. Facilities operating on site include manufacturers of glass containers, tank trailer parts and plastics as well as a mechanical construction contracting business. These plant facilities provide over a thousand local jobs and contribute millions in estimated employment income to the community.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Newton County Mine Tailings

The 300-acre Newton County Mine Tailings Superfund site is located in Newton County, Missouri. Extensive mining in the area between 1850 and 1970 resulted in underground mine openings with exposed lead, cadmium and zinc ores. Waste from mining activities has resulted in the contamination of surface soil, sediments, surface water and groundwater with heavy metals. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2003. Cleanup activities include removal and disposal of contaminated soils and sediments, capping of disposal areas, revegetation of the excavated and capped areas, monitoring, and institutional controls to restrict the use of the disposal areas. Removal of contaminated residential-yard soils and replacement of residential water supplies has finished. Following cleanup, several acres have been returned to beneficial use. A city park has reopened on site; new park facilities include a sand volleyball court and a horseshoe pit.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Superfund site is located in Joplin, Missouri. Mining, milling and smelting of lead and zinc ores at the site began in the 1850s and continued in some areas until the 1970s. The smelting operations dispersed airborne contaminants, resulting in the contamination of site groundwater, surface water and soil with metals, including lead. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. EPA conducted a time-critical removal action to address high blood lead levels in local children and cleaned up 2,600 residential properties and agricultural lands in surrounding communities. Through the efforts of EPA, the state of Missouri and the community, the site is in productive reuse. The site is now home to a scrap metal recycling facility, a highway bypass, restored neighborhoods and over 4,000 acres of cleaned-up land that is ready for redevelopment. Through a Prospective Purchaser Agreement with EPA, the scrap metal recycler bought and cleaned up 40 acres of the site prior to building its facility. After an agreement between EPA and the State of Missouri, the Missouri Highway and Transportation Department built the Route 249 highway bypass across part of the site in 2001. The project reused mine wastes as fill material. Cleanup of mine waste began in 2007, and the Route 249 bypass opened to the public in 2008. EPA also developed innovative solutions for disposal of site wastes to allow for future development. For example, long, narrow containment areas were turned into several miles of new roads. An abandoned water treatment lagoon will soon host a 36-acre sports complex in Webb City. Filling and capping of a mine subsidence pit added 26 acres of new park land in Webb City. Other containment areas have also been designed and built with development in mind, including one that will host a 40-acre truck stop. Cleanup also included the backfilling and revegetation of removal areas and the construction of wetlands. Community members also continue to use parts of the site property for residential and agricultural purposes.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Shenandoah Stables

The 7-acre Shenandoah Stables Superfund site is located near Moscow Mills, Missouri. In 1971, a St. Louis waste oil hauler sprayed the horse arena with about 2,000 gallons of dioxin-contaminated oil for dust control. Afterward, several adults and children became ill, and many birds, rodents and horses died. In 1971, site operators removed contaminated soil for use as fill material for a new highway. In 1972, site operators disposed of more soil removed from the arena in a swampy area on site. EPA sampling in 1982 confirmed dioxin contamination of the arena soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983 and started site cleanup in 1990. Cleanup activities included the removal and off-site burning of tons of dioxin-contaminated soils. Following the removal of site contaminants, the cleanup of site storage structures and fencing further protected public health and safety. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2001. The site remains in continued use. A horse stable and a private residence are located on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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St. Louis Airport/Hazelwood Interim Storage/Futura Coatings Co. Core Infrastructure Reuse

St. Louis Airport/Hazelwood Interim Storage/Futura Coatings Co.St. Louis Airport/Hazelwood Interim Storage/Futura Coatings Co.The 45-acre St. Louis Airport/Hazelwood Interim Storage/Futura Coatings Co. Superfund site includes many properties in two areas – the St. Louis Downtown site and the North County sites. The St. Louis Downtown site includes the Mallinckrodt Chemical Plant. The North County sites are located near Lambert International Airport. The North County sites include the St. Louis Airport site, Hazelwood Interim Storage site and nearby properties. From 1942 to 1957, site operators processed uranium ores at the St. Louis Downtown site. Transfer of process residues to sites near the airport resulted in the contamination of site properties. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities include soil removal and disposal. Covidien currently owns and operates the former Mallinckrodt facility. A range of active businesses are located on site, including a lumberyard and metal salvage and steel fabrication facilities, as well as railroad lines, bridges and part of the earthen levee and concrete floodwall that protects the St. Louis area from Mississippi River floodwaters.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 89 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 4,830 people and generated an estimated $1,598,775,223 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Syntex Facility Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Syntex Facility Superfund site is located in an agricultural area in Verona, Missouri. Initial use of the 180-acre area along the Spring River was for agricultural and recreational purposes. Hoffman-Taff began manufacturing chemicals on site in the 1960s; Agent Orange production took place between 1968 and 1969. Syntex Agribusiness (Syntex) bought the facility in 1969. The company ended production of Agent Orange and began manufacturing a chemical antiseptic. Dioxin was a byproduct of site operations. Waste disposal in several areas at the facility contaminated soil and groundwater as well as fish downstream in the Spring River. State and federal agencies conducted investigations related to releases from the facility beginning as early as the 1960s. EPA placed the Syntex facility on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA removed contaminated soil and capped and revegetated removal areas. The shallow aquifer in the area is available for use by rural households for domestic purposes and in some cases for agriculture. Water utilities and large-scale agricultural operations use the deep aquifer.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 68 people and generated an estimated $88,851,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Times Beach Capped Site Reuse

The 1-square-mile Times Beach Superfund site is located 20 miles southwest of St. Louis, Missouri. The site is a formerly incorporated city that sprayed its roads with waste oil to control dust in the early 1970s. During a 1982 investigation, EPA discovered that the City used dioxin-contaminated oil. During the same period, the nearby Meramec River flooded the city and residents had to evacuate their homes. Afterward, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the permanent relocation of the evacuated residents. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA also transferred funds to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the permanent relocation of residents and businesses in 1983. All residents successfully relocated by the end of 1986. The State of Missouri then took ownership of the site. Cleanup activities finished in 1997. In 1999, a state park opened at the restored site and EPA took the site off the NPL in 2001. The park provides more than 7 miles of trails for hiking, biking and equestrian use. Visitors can see a range of wildlife, including turkeys, geese, deer and more than 40 species of birds. Other park facilities include picnic areas and a boat ramp that provides access to the Meramec River. In 2012, EPA completed a reassessment of the park to determine, in part, if any residual dioxin contamination remained above the recently revised non-cancer reference dose. The reassessment concluded that current use of the Route 66 State Park does not pose significant health risks to public visitors or park workers.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 4 people. For additional information click here.

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Valley Park TCE

The Valley Park TCE Superfund site is located in Valley Park, Missouri. The site consists of two source areas and an area-wide contaminant plume. To manage the cleanup, EPA divided the site into three areas, or operable units (OUs). OU1 includes contaminated soils on the property formerly owned by Wainwright Industries. OU2 includes contaminated soils at the property owned by Valley Technologies and the area-wide contaminant plume. OU3 is the contaminated groundwater beneath OU1. OU1 and OU3 make up Wainwright Operable Unit (WOU). The selected remedy for WOU included soil vapor extraction (SVE) of contaminated soil, removal and off-site disposal of contaminated surface soil, monitoring, removal and treatment of contaminated groundwater, and institutional controls. The OU2 remedy included removal of shallow contaminated soils, SVE of remaining contaminated soil, monitoring, removal and treatment of contaminated groundwater, and institutional controls. Under EPA and state oversight, a potentially responsible party completed construction of the WOU remedy in 1999. EPA completed construction of the OU2 remedy in 2006. Because the WOU and OU2 remedy did not adequately address all site contamination, investigations for future cleanup are ongoing. A business is currently located on the WOU property. Valley Technologies continues to operate on the OU2 property. Surrounding areas have remained in residential and commercial use during cleanup.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 57 people and generated an estimated $8,485,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Wheeling Disposal Service Co., Inc., Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Wildlife preserve on the siteWheeling Disposal Service Co., Inc., LandfillThe 20-acre Wheeling Disposal Service Co., Inc., Landfill Superfund site is located south of Amazonia, Missouri. Wheeling Disposal Service Company operated a sanitary and industrial landfill on site starting in the early 1970s. The landfill closed in 1986. Former waste disposal activities resulted in site-wide contamination. EPA field investigations detected contamination in monitoring wells, springs and soil on site. In 1989, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup included upgrading the existing landfill cap with a clay and soil cover and monitoring groundwater and surface water. During cleanup, the owner dug a pond. With assistance from the State, the owner planted native wild grasses and other plants to attract birds and wildlife. Bordered on all sides by creeks and ravines, the site now hosts habitat for wildlife and birds and is a local hunting and fishing area. The efforts of EPA, the State and the property owner turned this former landfill into an important ecological and recreational resource. EPA took the site off the NPL in October 2000.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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