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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in New Hampshire

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Auburn Road Landfill Capped Site Reuse

A model plane taking off at the siteAuburn Road LandfillThe 200-acre Auburn Road Landfill Superfund site is located in Londonderry, New Hampshire. The site includes three separate disposal areas that cover about 12 acres. A disposal area for chemical wastes, tires, demolition debris and solid waste operated on site from the 1960s to 1980. The State of New Hampshire found contamination in soil, groundwater and surface water and ordered the landfill’s closure in 1980. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included capping and fencing of contaminated areas as well as extension of the public water supply to nearby residents. Groundwater sampling is ongoing. Parts of the site are in recreational reuse as a model airplane flying field. The flying field opened in 2008. Site reuse was the result of collaboration among EPA, the New Hampshire Flying Tigers Academy of Model Aeronautics and the Town of Londonderry.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Fletcher's Paint Works & Storage Capped Site Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

The Fletcher’s Paint Works & Storage Superfund site is located in Milford, New Hampshire. A paint manufacturing plant and retail outlet operated on site from 1949 to 1991. In 1982, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) inspected the facility. NHDES found leaking and open drums on site. NHDES also found site-related contamination in the Keyes Municipal Water Supply Well next to the site. EPA placed the 2-acre area on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Past cleanup efforts include building demolition, drum removal, fencing, temporary cover installation, removal of contaminated soil from residential properties, and placement of a temporary liner and gravel cover over highly contaminated areas. In 1996, at the request of the town of Milford, the potentially responsible party (PRP) removed soil with low levels of contamination at the Elm Street Area of the site to allow for construction of a Korean War Memorial. In 2017, construction activities were completed, which included the Mill Street Area soil excavation, backfilling of the area with clean soil and a grass cover, and relocation of Mill Street part of the area for better local traffic management. In addition, construction activities at the Elm Street Area include soil excavation, an engineered soils and grass cover permitting recreational use, and an asphalt cover over select areas providing the town with additional parking for nearby Keyes Recreational Field. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing.
Last updated April 2018
 
As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.


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Kearsarge Metallurgical Corp.

Kearsage Metallurgical Corp.Kearsage Metallurgical Corp.The 9-acre Kearsarge Metallurgical Corporation (KMC) Superfund site is located in Conway, New Hampshire, on the north shore of Pequawket Pond. From 1964 until 1982, KMC made stainless steel castings on site. The manufacturing process created waste casting sands, wax and solvents. KMC dumped these wastes in a wooded wetland east of the facility. When operations ceased, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and EPA found a waste pile, soils and groundwater contaminated with solvents. Congress placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in September 1984. Cleanup began in 1992, and included removal of 13,620 tons of contaminated soils and construction of a groundwater treatment plant. During 12 years of operation, the plant treated over 250 million gallons of water and removed more than 225 pounds of contaminants. In 2012, the town sold the site property at auction to help invigorate the surrounding industrial park. EPA and NHDES addressed remaining groundwater contamination with a soil treatment remedy in 2015. A towing company, a heating business, and a farm equipment and diesel truck repair facility are currently located in the former groundwater treatment plant and part of the original KMC building. Ecological reuse includes forested wetlands that provide ecological habitat along the northern bank of Pequawket Pond.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 8 people and generated an estimated $716,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Ottati & Goss/Kingston Steel Drum

Restored wetland at the siteOttati & Goss/Kingston Steel DrumThe 35-acre Ottati & Goss/Kingston Steel Drum Superfund site is located in Kingston, New Hampshire. The site includes a 6-acre parcel, known as the Great Lakes Corporation area and a 1-acre parcel, known as the Ottati & Goss area. From the late 1950s through 1980, various owners reconditioned steel drums on the Great Lakes Corporation area. Runoff and seepage from this area into nearby surface water killed fish and aquatic vegetation. From 1978 through 1979, site operators processed waste at the Ottati & Goss area. Activities contaminated soil, groundwater and surface water. After operations ended in 1979, the New Hampshire Bureau of Solid Waste Management prohibited site operators from restarting operations. The Bureau ordered the removal of thousands of deteriorating and leaking drums from the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included removal of leaking drums and thousands of tons of soil and debris, excavation and on-site treatment of soil and sediment using thermal desorption, groundwater and soil treatment using in-place chemical oxidation, and wetland restoration for ecological reuse. Wetland restoration included the placement of over 20,000 cubic yards of manufactured wetland material and the planting of more than 1,000 trees and shrubs.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Somersworth Sanitary Landfill Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 26-acre Somersworth Sanitary Landfill Superfund site is located in Somersworth, New Hampshire. The City of Somersworth operated a waste disposal area at the site from the mid-1930s until 1981. The City burned residential, commercial and industrial wastes at the site. In 1958, the City stopped burning waste and converted the area into a landfill. Improper disposal practices contaminated site soil, sediment and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included groundwater containment and treatment, a landfill cover, and gas venting, as well as land and groundwater use restrictions. Prior to the site’s listing on the NPL, the City covered a 10-acre portion of the site with clean fill for use as a recreation area. This area now includes a basketball court. Part of the site not developed as a part of the landfill remains wetlands. In 2013, EPA presented the City with an initial assessment of renewable energy opportunities for the site. The City chose to move forward with plans for a solar facility. The city selected the N.H. Solar Garden company as its project partner and is working with them to finalize plans for the facility.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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South Municipal Water Supply Well Core Infrastructure Reuse

South Municipal Water Supply WellSouth Municipal Water Supply WellThe 250-acre South Municipal Water Supply Well Superfund site is located in the Contoocook River Valley in Peterborough, New Hampshire. Installed in 1952, the South Municipal Water Supply Well provided water to Peterborough for nearly 30 years. In 1982, the State of New Hampshire routinely tested the water supply. Results showed contaminants in the South Well. Use of the well ended. Investigations found that the nearby New Hampshire Ball Bearings facility was the source of the contamination. The facility has manufactured precision ball bearings since 1956. Activities at the facility contaminated soil, groundwater, wetland sediments and surface water. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Initial cleanup activities included groundwater and soil treatment, off-site disposal of contaminated sediments, and wetland restoration. Later, EPA determined that restoration of some of the contaminated groundwater at the site was not possible. EPA updated the remedy to contain the groundwater instead of treating it. In 2008, EPA found that the site remedy was not functioning as intended. EPA updated the cleanup plan in 2010 to change source control and migration management activities. New Hampshire Ball Bearings completed a below-ground wall to clean up contaminated groundwater in 2014. In-place thermal treatment of an on-site source area finished in 2016. Current site uses include the 24-acre active New Hampshire Ball Bearings manufacturing plant, commercial and residential properties, part of U.S. Route 202, and wetlands.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 562 people and generated an estimated $85,717,647 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Synergy (Former)

Synergy (Former)Synergy (Former)The Synergy Site is located in Claremont, New Hampshire. From the turn of the century until the mid-1940s, a manufactured gas plant operated on site. Operations contaminated soil with coal tar, a common contaminant of that process. Between 2010 and 2012, investigations identified waste perched on bedrock that was leaching into the Sugar River. Cleanup activities included removing structures and soil, stabilization, and capping. Because of the historical importance of the gas plant to the town’s textile history and EPA’s obligations under the Historical Preservation Act, EPA coordinated with the State Historic Preservation Office during cleanup activities. A brick-and-concrete structure and plaques will memorialize the site’s history. The site is located near the visitor center and is part of the community’s historic downtown area. Looking forward, the town plans to include the site as part of a larger recreation area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Tinkham Garage

The Dunkin Donuts restaurant and Baskin Robbins restaurant in the commercial retail plaza on the siteTinkham GarageThe 375-acre Tinkham Garage Superfund site is located in Londonderry, New Hampshire. On one end of the site, solvents and other hazardous substances were discharged behind a garage during the late 1970s. On another part of the site, petroleum, solvents and wash waters were discharged into the leach fields of the Woodland Village Condominium complex. In 1978, residents complained of foam and odors in a small unnamed stream that runs through the complex. Investigators found soil and groundwater contamination. In 1983, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included groundwater and soil treatment, extension of the public water line to the condo complex and nearby houses as well as sewer lines, and groundwater monitoring. Groundwater monitoring, construction of additional water line extensions to residents and additional source area and bedrock investigations are ongoing. During cleanup, EPA provided information to interested parties about reuse considerations for the site. Today, a shopping complex including a Home Depot, Staples and Dunkin’ Donuts occupies the northeastern area of the site. The Woodland Village Condominium complex and several single-family homes remain on the northern part of the site. The Nevins Retirement Cooperative Association completed construction of over 125 residences on the central part of the site. These residences are part of a senior housing development. Site redevelopment has increased property values in Londonderry. Increased economic activity at the site has also encouraged local infrastructure improvements.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA had data on 7 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 303 people and generated an estimated $95,076,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Town Garage/Radio Beacon

The Town Garage/Radio Beacon Superfund site is located in Londonderry, New Hampshire. The U.S. Department of Defense owned part of the site from the early 1940s until 1968 and operated a radio beacon there during World War II. Afterwards, the site contained a series of residential wells and one commercial well. A 1984 state inspection found groundwater contamination in many of the wells. In the late 1980s, owners of six residences affected by groundwater contamination in wells chose to connect to the local public water supply. As a precaution, several other residences have since connected to the public water supply. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included annual monitoring of natural processes to clean up groundwater and placing restrictions to prevent groundwater use for household purposes. The success of EPA’s cleanup plan allowed for site reuse. Today, the site includes two residential developments and a wetland area. The Holton Circle development includes about 25 homes and the Saddlebrook development includes 20 new homes. In 2014, EPA took the site off the NPL.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Troy Mills Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Troy Mills LandfillTroy Mills LandfillThe Troy Mills Landfill Superfund site is part of a larger 270-acre parcel in Troy, New Hampshire. From 1967 until 1978, Troy Mills used the property to dispose of solid waste and hazardous materials generated by its manufacturing plant. In 1978, the state of New Hampshire ordered the company to stop these disposal practices. During the 1980s and 1990s, environmental investigations confirmed on-site soil, groundwater, surface water and sediment contamination. Troy Mills filed for bankruptcy in 2001. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2003. Cleanup actions included installing a system to collect hazardous materials from the groundwater. Cleanup also included removal of drums containing flammable liquid waste, waste sludge and contaminated soil. After removing contaminated soil, EPA backfilled excavated areas and capped them. In 2005, EPA supported community efforts to identify reuse options for the site. The community expressed interest in a passive recreation area. Today, an on-site trail network forms part of the 42-mile Cheshire Branch Rail Trail system. Limited access to the site for recreational use will continue until EPA finishes cleanup activities. Future recreation opportunities at the site could include hiking, horseback riding, snowmobiling, mountain biking and cross-country skiing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2018, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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