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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in New Jersey

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American Cyanamid Co. Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

Minor league baseball park now at the siteAmerican Cyanamid Co.The 575-acre American Cyanamid Co Superfund site is located in Bridgewater Township, New Jersey. Many chemical and pharmaceutical manufacturers operated on site for over 90 years. Improper waste storage and disposal contaminated surrounding soil and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In 1996, EPA selected a remedy for the 140-acre portion of the site known as the Hill Property. The remedy called for no further action with groundwater monitoring. EPA took this portion of the site off the NPL in 1998 after ensuring that it posed no current or future risks to human health and the environment. Cleanup activities continue on the remaining 435 acres of the site. EPA and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) supported community efforts to develop the site. A 6,488-seat minor league baseball stadium also opened on site in 1999. Installation of solar panels at the stadium took place in 2013. The solar panels provide about 90 percent of the stadium’s energy needs. Additionally, the Bridgewater Promenade is located on site and provides retail, hotel and office space. Efforts at the site have also resulted in the historic preservation of the Van Horne House, a structure listed on the National Register of Historic Places and New Jersey Register of Historic Houses. In 2002, the Heritage Trail Association moved its headquarters to the Van Horne House. The house includes an exhibit space, gift shop, meeting rooms and office space.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 30 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,477 people and generated an estimated $332,213,250 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Bog Creek Farm Athletic Fields Reuse

The Bog Creek Farm siteBog Creek FarmThe Bog Creek Farm Superfund site covers a 4-acre area on a 12-acre former farm in Howell Township, New Jersey. Between 1973 and 1974, the property owner dumped toxic material on the property. This dumping contaminated groundwater, sediment and soil. Site investigations in the early 1980s found volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in on-site groundwater and surface water. Investigations also found VOCs, phthalates, and pesticides in site sediments. VOCs, pesticides and heavy metals were detected in site soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In 1984, the site owner removed contaminated materials. In 1989 and 1990, EPA removed and burned contaminated materials from the soil and capped and reseeded the cleaned-up area. To clean the groundwater, EPA constructed a slurry wall and installed a groundwater treatment system. The system operated for 10 years. In 2004 and 2005, EPA removed and disposed of more contaminated soil. In 2011, EPA installed a small, automated treatment plant to address ongoing groundwater contamination. EPA determined that an area that was originally part of the site did not endanger human health or the environment. After receiving this property as a donation, Howell Township worked to develop athletic fields on the property. EPA constructed a fence between the site and the athletic fields to facilitate the reuse.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Brick Township Landfill Alternative Energy Reuse Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Solar panels at the siteBrick Township LandfillThe Brick Township Landfill Superfund site is located in Brick Township, New Jersey. The 42-acre landfill operated for more than 30 years, accepting sewage, solids, bulk liquids and other wastes. Brick Township acquired the site property in 1973 and continued landfill operations until its closure in 1979. Years of dumping resulted in contaminated groundwater and soil. Groundwater is the source of public and private drinking supplies. Restrictions are in place to prevent use of public or private wells located within the area of contaminated groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The site’s remedy includes an impermeable cap and long-term groundwater monitoring. In 2011, the Township entered into an agreement with a solar development company to allow it to lease the site property and install a 7-megawatt field of solar panels. EPA worked with stakeholders to ensure compatibility of the landfill cap and the installation of over 24,000 solar panels on the cap. The solar array started operating in 2014. It supplies electricity to the Township’s government buildings and community parks. In 2015, EPA Region 2 recognized the project with its first-ever Excellence in Site Reuse Award.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Brook Industrial Park

The 4.5-acre Brook Industrial Park Superfund site is located on the northern bank of the Raritan River in Bound Brook, New Jersey. The site included three buildings – the Stirling Center, the Blue Spruce International building and the National Metal Finishings Corporation building. Beginning in 1971, several companies used the site for industrial, chemical and pesticide production and storage operations. Between 1980 and 1988, investigations found leaking drums and illegal waste at the site. Contaminants also discharged into the Raritan River. Industrial operations contaminated soil, groundwater and surface water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Beginning in 1994, EPA demolished structures, disposed of contaminated materials and soils, installed a groundwater treatment system and started long-term monitoring. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. Today, industrial use of the site by various businesses continues. Two of the original businesses still operate on site, conducting manufacturing and metal plating operations. EPA’s approach enabled the businesses to continue operating during cleanup.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 10 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 69 people and generated an estimated $15,725,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Burnt Fly Bog

The Burnt Fly Bog Superfund site is located in Old Bridge Township and Marlboro Township, New Jersey. During the 1950s and 1960s, oil waste recovery activities and unlined waste oil lagoons on the 60-acre site contaminated surface water and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) led the cleanup of the source area. Cleanup included removing wastes and contaminated soil, filling in excavated areas with clean soil, and covering the area with a clay cap and tall grass. NJDEP also restored wetlands and created additional wetland areas on site. Wetlands provide habitat for diverse wildlife.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Chemical Insecticide Corp.

Chemical Insecticide Corp.Chemical Insecticide Corp.The Chemical Insecticide Corporation Superfund site is located in Edison Township, New Jersey. Chemical Insecticide Corporation owned and operated a facility on the 5.7-acre area from 1854 to 1970. The facility’s operations and waste handling practices led to extensive soil, sediment and groundwater contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. Between 1989 and 2004, EPA selected final remedies for various parts of the site. Cleanup activities included controlling contaminated runoff, addressing soil and sediment in off-site creek areas, and cleaning up soil, surface water and groundwater. Cleanup finished in 2005. Long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing. Edison Township purchased the site property in 2008. The site is home to the Metuchen-Edison Community Dog Park. The park opened to the public in June 2016. The dog park includes walking paths, shaded play areas, benches and water fountains as well as parking. Donations from area businesses and local groups allowed for the addition of dog playground equipment, a children’s playground and a butterfly garden to the site in 2017.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Chemsol, Inc. Capped Site Reuse

The 40-acre Chemsol, Inc. Superfund site is located in Piscataway, New Jersey. From the 1950s to 1964, Chemsol operated a chemical solvent processing facility on site. Workers blended, mixed and separated liquid solvents and various flammable materials. Several accidents occurred on site, including fires and explosions. In 1964, a chemical gas release forced an emergency evacuation of nearby residents. After the incident, the township of Piscataway ordered Chemsol to shut down. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection directed the new site owner, Tang Realty, to investigate the soil and groundwater contamination. Tang Realty installed 40 monitoring wells and then removed contaminated soils in 1988. In 1994, EPA completed construction of a groundwater treatment plant. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. In 2011, agencies decided to double the capacity of the treatment plant to expedite the cleanup. Cleanup activities also included full restoration of over 4.5 acres of wetland areas disturbed during soil removal activities. The wetland areas now provide green space and serve as an environmental resource.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Ciba-Geigy Corp.

The 1,400-acre Ciba-Geigy Corp. Superfund site is located in Toms River, New Jersey. Starting in 1952, Ciba-Geigy Corporation (then called Toms River Chemical Company) operated a resin and dye manufacturing facility on the site. Improper chemical waste disposal contaminated soil and groundwater. Investigations by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and EPA found leaking drums of waste and carcinogenic compounds on site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA dug up and disposed of more than 47,000 drums off site. EPA continues groundwater treatment. In 2009, BASF purchased the site property. In coordination with BASF, high school environmental science classes are using the site to conduct wildlife surveys and to learn about the site’s history, contamination and cleanup. BASF also provides tours to local students concerning the history of the site, groundwater remediation and wildlife species on site. Forested areas of the site provide habitat to wildlife including coyotes, red and gray foxes, turkeys, raccoons, deer and various species of birds.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Cooper Road

The Cooper Road Superfund site covers less than 100 square feet in Voorhees Township, New Jersey. In 1982, local authorities found several dozen vials containing hazardous liquids at the site. Some vials had broken, leaking liquids into the soil. In 1984, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The state of New Jersey oversaw cleanup activities. The cleanup removed about 200 cubic yards of contaminated soil and other materials and sent them off site for disposal. Sampling after the cleanup found no significant levels of contaminants in soil or groundwater. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1989. Cleanup allowed for the site’s reuse as part of a residential development.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Cornell Dubilier Electronics, Inc. Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Cornell-Dubilier Electronics, Inc. site is located in South Plainfield, New Jersey, and is comprised of a 26-acre property, now known as the Hamilton Industrial Park; several adjacent residential, commercial and municipal properties; and the adjoining Bound Brook corridor. Between 1936 and 1962, the company operated a facility on the property that manufactured electronic components. Poor waste handling practices resulted in releases of transformer oils into the soils, sediments and groundwater at the site. EPA investigated the site in the mid-1990s and found contamination in soils, buildings and groundwater as well as in the nearby Bound Brook. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1998. EPA’s first phase of cleanup activities began in 2006 and included residential, commercial and municipal properties near the former facility. EPA relocated the commercial tenants of Hamilton Industrial Park. Cleanup activities started with building demolitions. EPA then excavated contaminated soil and treated or properly disposed of it. Lastly, EPA capped the property. In 2009, federal funding helped speed cleanup of remaining soil and debris. The borough of South Plainfield identified the 26-acre former facility as a redevelopment area. While EPA continues to address other portions of the site, EPA completed cleanup of the former facility in 2012. Cleanup has allowed the continued use of residential, commercial and municipal properties at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Curcio Scrap Metal, Inc.

The 1-acre Curcio Scrap Metal, Inc. Superfund site is located in Saddle Brook Township, New Jersey. In the early 1950s, Curcio Scrap Metals, Inc. (CSMI), a scrap-metal salvaging and recycling company, began operating on site. In 1981, CSMI expanded operations to a neighboring lot. The following year, while processing used electrical transformers, CSMI operators unknowingly spilled oil and liquid substances onto the ground. The contamination posed a threat to public water supplies. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. CSMI and SECO, the original owners of the electrical transformers, agreed to assist with the site’s cleanup. In 1991, EPA issued a cleanup plan to address contaminated soil, groundwater and surface water. Three years later, EPA testing showed that the cleanup successfully neutralized the contamination. Long-term groundwater monitoring began in 2000 and is ongoing. Today, scrap-metal recycling operations remain active on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 19 people and generated an estimated $8,859,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Curtis Specialty Papers, Inc. Cultural/Historical Reuse

Curtis Specialty Papers, Inc.Curtis Specialty Papers, Inc.The Curtis Specialty Papers, Inc. Superfund site is located in a mixed-use area in the borough of Milford and Alexandria Township in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. The 86-acre area is a former paper mill on the Delaware River. The paper mill operated until 2003. The area included buildings, a power plant and a wastewater treatment facility. Site soils and groundwater became contaminated as a result of poor waste handling. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2009. EPA worked with two potentially responsible parties on site cleanup. Activities included removal of underground and aboveground storage tanks, disposal of drums containing chemicals, and demolition of several buildings. The parties also removed lead-based paint, asbestos and contaminated upland soil. A creek discharges into the Delaware River at the northern end of the site. Creek cleanup efforts involved removing contaminated sediments, stabilizing the bank, and restoring the creek with native vegetation. In addition to creek restoration, a former outdoor basin is now a wildlife habitat area. In 2015, EPA issued a Record of Decision requiring cleanup of the groundwater contamination. EPA is working with the two parties on the groundwater cleanup. Demolition of the mill buildings is underway. EPA will continue to work with site stakeholders to support safe and appropriate reuse.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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De Rewal Chemical Co.

De Rewal Chemical Co.De Rewal Chemical Co.The DeRewal Chemical Co. Superfund site occupies about 8 acres in Kingwood Township, New Jersey. From 1970 to 1973, DeRewal Chemical Company stored chemicals on site. Several chemical spills in 1973 led to soil contamination, and the company ended operations. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Since cleanup began in 1990, EPA has removed 60,000 tons of contaminated soil. EPA completed remedy construction at the site in 2003. Groundwater remediation has also been performed. During cleanup, EPA recovered about 3,000 American Indian artifacts. EPA transferred the artifacts to Kingwood Township. The Kingwood Township Municipal Building now displays the artifacts. The state of New Jersey obtained a conservation easement from the Township in January 2002. The conservation easement includes parts of the site in the Delaware River Greenway and restricts activities that might hinder public use of the open space. In November 2002, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection purchased part of the site property for open space conservation. The area provides recreational opportunities and habitat for birds. A bike path runs through the site and is a popular recreational feature.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Delilah Road

The 40-acre Delilah Road site is located in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. The area was originally used for a sand-and-gravel excavation operation. It was later converted into a solid waste disposal area, which accepted municipal and construction wastes and some hazardous wastes. Facility operations contaminated groundwater and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities included installation of municipal water supply mains, landfill capping and deed restrictions. After completion of cleanup activities, EPA removed the site from the NPL in 2009. Long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing. KDC Solar built a 45,000-panel solar array on site. The array started operating in October 2016.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed one person and generated an estimated $3,725,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Diamond Alkali Co.

The Diamond Alkali Superfund site is located in Newark, New Jersey. The site includes a former pesticide manufacturing plant at 80 and 120 Lister Avenue, a 17-mile tidal stretch of the Lower Passaic River and Newark Bay. Manufacturing operations took place at the former manufacturing plant for over 30 years. Many other businesses also relied on the river and the bay for waste disposal. Over time, dioxin, metals, pesticides and other hazardous substances contaminated all three portions of the site. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. EPA, in partnership with state and federal agencies, the potentially responsible parties (PRPs), and a community advisory group (CAG), is addressing the site’s cleanup. The CAG includes members of the community, environmental groups, residents, area businesses and municipalities. In 2001, land cleanup included the capping of contaminated soil and debris, construction of a slurry wall and floodwall, and groundwater treatment. Cleanup activities in 2012 and 2013 included removal and disposal of dioxin-contaminated sediments from two areas of the river. Cleanups for the remainder of the river and the bay are in the planning phases. In addition to site cleanup, the cooperative efforts of the government partners, the PRPs and the CAG have enabled local job creation. The cooperative efforts have also enabled designation of the Passaic River as an Urban Waters Federal Partnership project. Ironbound Community Corporation and the city of Newark have worked together on riverfront tours, boat tours and educational workshops. They designed these projects to bring people to the river to learn about its past, present and future. In 2013, the Newark Riverfront park opened adjacent to the site. It provides 4 acres of open space and features a boardwalk, a floating boat dock, a dancing pavilion, walking and biking paths, and environmental signage. In 2014, the Dundee Dam Riverwalk Park opened on part of the site. The park runs along the Passaic River and features a bike path, park benches, black locust trees and rose bushes. Commercial, industrial, residential and ecological use continue on the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Diamond Head Oil Refinery Div.

The 30-acre Diamond Head Oil Refinery Div. Superfund site is located in Kearny, New Jersey. From 1946 to 1979, operators reprocessed oil on part of the site. The site also includes wetland areas, a drainage ditch, a small pond and a vegetated landfill. Disposal practices at the site resulted in the contamination of soil, sediment and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2002. Cleanup activities are ongoing. Cleanup includes excavation, a vegetated soil cover and wetland restoration. The site includes part of the Interstate 280 interchange cloverleaf.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Fair Lawn Well Field Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Fair Lawn Well Field Superfund site is located in Fair Lawn, New Jersey. The site consists of four municipal wells that are part of the Westmoreland Well Field. In 1982, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) discovered volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in these municipal wells. NJDEP identified two companies in Fair Lawn Industrial Park as the main source of groundwater contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities are being conducted under state and federal authority. NJDEP is overseeing the source removal of contaminated soil and groundwater at each facility. EPA is involved with the cleanup of contaminated groundwater migrating from the facility to the municipal wells. In 2008, after EPA identified a third potentially responsible party (PRP) in the industrial park, the three PRPs agreed to install additional monitoring wells and conduct sampling of groundwater and surface water. These activities were conducted in several phases between 2009 and 2017. EPA selected a final cleanup plan to address groundwater contamination in 2018. The borough of Fair Lawn no longer uses the municipal wells as a drinking water supply source but utilizes an outside drinking water source. Residential, commercial and industrial activities continue on the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Federal Creosote

The former Federal Creosote Superfund site occupied about 50 acres in a residential and commercial area in Manville, New Jersey. A coal tar wood-treatment facility operated on site from 1911 to 1955. After operations ended, a developer purchased the site property. In the 1960s, the developer built the Claremont residential neighborhood on 35 acres of the site. This residential area included 137 single-family homes. The remaining 15 acres of the site became the Rustic Mall, a commercial shopping center. The Rustic Mall is no longer in use. EPA’s investigations showed that creosote materials and contaminated soils from the wood-treatment facility remained at the site prior to redevelopment. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Cleanup addressed residential areas, soil contamination at the Rustic Mall, and groundwater. EPA permanently relocated 23 property owners and demolished 18 homes. This allowed for removal of soil and materials for treatment and off-site disposal. EPA cleaned up a total of 93 residential properties at the site. Long-term groundwater monitoring and groundwater use restrictions continue to protect human health and the environment. The site remedy is consistent with future uses in Manville’s Town Center redevelopment plans. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2014. Residential use of cleaned-up properties continues.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Former Kil-Tone Company

The Former Kil-Tone Company Superfund site is located in Vineland, New Jersey. From the 1910s until the 1930s, operators used the property for pesticide manufacturing. These activities contaminated soil on the 4-acre property and some residential and commercial properties around the property. Activities also contaminated soil, sediment, surface water and groundwater downgradient of the property. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2016. EPA is currently cleaning up residential properties and investigating contamination on non-residential properties. Commercial, industrial and recreational use continue on the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Garden State Cleaners Co.

The Garden State Cleaners Co. (GCS) Superfund site occupies about 1 acre in Buena Borough, New Jersey. A dry-cleaning facility operated at the site from 1969 to 2011. Until 1985, dry-cleaning operations included the improper discharge of dry-cleaning wastes. In 1984, a New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection investigation discovered volatile organic compounds in soils around the facility and in wells around the site. In response to this discovery, Buena Borough built a new water supply system and closed some private residential wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Cleanup activities included removal and treatment of contaminated soil as well as groundwater treatment and monitoring. In 2011, EPA acquired the GSC property and demolished the facility. This allowed EPA to access and remove contaminated soil beneath the building. EPA completed soil cleanup in September 2011. Currently the site is vacant. Zoned for commercial use, the property is available for future redevelopment.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Garfield Ground Water Contamination

The Garfield Groundwater Contamination site is located in Garfield, New Jersey. The site consists of the E.C. Electroplating (ECE) property and a chromium groundwater plume that extends ½ mile west from the ECE property to the Passaic River. From the late 1930s until 2009, a custom metal plating shop operated on site. On-site activities resulted in the contamination of soil, groundwater, and residential and commercial basements. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2011. Cleanup activities included groundwater treatment and extraction, monitoring, restricting use of groundwater, and inspection and mitigation of residential and commercial basements in the areas affected by contaminated groundwater. These activities are ongoing.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Glen Ridge Radium Site Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 130-acre Glen Ridge Radium Superfund site includes properties in the towns of Glen Ridge, Bloomfield and East Orange, New Jersey. In the early 1900s, radium processors disposed of radium-contaminated waste materials, coal ash and trash at the site. These activities resulted in widespread radioactive soil contamination. In the 1920s, residential developers used contaminated materials to fill in low-lying areas and built many homes on contaminated fill. In a few instances, developers mixed contaminated materials with cement for sidewalks and foundations. In 1983, the state of New Jersey identified homes with high levels of radon gas, radon decay products, and indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1985. Cleanup work began in 1990 and included removal and off-site disposal of radium-contaminated soil. Afterward, workers restored properties. Cleanup and restoration work finished in 2004. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2009. The successful cleanup allowed the continued use of several public parks and streets. It also allowed hundreds of residents to continue living in their homes.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 7 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 29 people and generated an estimated $7,200,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Grand Street Mercury

The Grand Street Mercury Superfund site is located at 720 and 722-732 Grand Street in Hoboken, New Jersey. From 1910 until about 1965, operators manufactured lamps on site, including mercury vapor lamps and mercury-containing switches. Mercury from the operations contaminated soils, a former industrial building, a townhouse, and an adjacent asphalt-covered parking lot. In 1993 and 1994, mercury was identified in the former industrial building while the property was being renovated into residential studio spaces. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1997. Cleanup activities included relocation of 15 families and 22 businesses, soil excavation and removal, and demolition of all buildings on site. After cleanup, EPA removed the site from the NPL in 2007. New residential buildings are now located on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Higgins Disposal

Higgins DisposalHiggins DisposalThe 37.6-acre Higgins Disposal Superfund site is located in Franklin Township, New Jersey. From the 1950s to 1985, a waste disposal business operated on site. The business included the operation of an unpermitted landfill, a waste transfer station and a container storage area. In 1985, testing found volatile organic compounds in area residential wells. In response, the State notified affected residents of the need to use bottled water or install whole-house water treatment systems. After a 1990 investigation identified the waste disposal facility as the source of contamination, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Initial cleanup activities included removing contaminated soil and waste containers and disposing of them off site. Demolition of the former waste transfer station took place in February 1999. In addition, affected residents received extensions and connections to the public water supply. On-site treatment of contaminated groundwater began in 2006 and is ongoing. Today, the site includes a residence, an equestrian school facility and a truck repair shop. Part of the site serves as a preservation easement for agricultural uses.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 7 people and generated an estimated $147,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Higgins Farm

Higgins FarmHiggins FarmThe 75-acre Higgins Farm Superfund site is located in Franklin Township, New Jersey. A waste disposal business operated on Laurel Avenue, about 1 mile from the site. According to local residents, the waste disposal operator used the site for the disposal of wastes. During the 1960s, workers used municipal sludge and penicillin wastes as fertilizers on the site area. In 1985, the Franklin Township Health Department sampled a nearby residential well and found high levels of chlorobenzene. Further investigations led to the discovery of a drum burial dump at the site. The drum burial dump was about 40 yards from the contaminated well. State investigations in 1986 determined that site activities resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater with volatile organic compounds, pesticides, dioxins and metals. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. In 1992, EPA dug up waste materials and contaminated soil and disposed of it off site. Cleanup activities also included the closure of affected wells, the connection of affected homes to the public water supply, and ongoing groundwater treatment and monitoring. EPA’s cleanup plan enabled the continued use of the site during cleanup. Today, the site continues to support agricultural use. A cattle farm is located on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Iceland Coin Laundry Area GW Plume

The Iceland Coin Laundry Area GW Plume Superfund site includes the former Iceland Coin Laundry and Dry Cleaning facility (former Iceland facility) and an associated contaminated groundwater plume in Vineland, New Jersey. From about 1953 until at least 1971, the former Iceland facility operated four coin-operated dry-cleaning units on site. Disposal practices resulted in the contamination of groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Cleanup activities have included biological groundwater treatment using amendment injection and long-term monitoring, as well as the establishment of a classification exemption area to restrict well installation in the plume area. Commercial operations continue in the on-site building while residents in and around the plume area are connected to public water.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 8 people and generated an estimated $1,300,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Imperial Oil Co., Inc./Champion Chemicals

The restored Henry Hudson Trail, located near the siteImperial Oil Co., Inc./Champion ChemicalsThe 15-acre Imperial Oil Co., Inc./Champion Chemicals Superfund Site is located in Morganville, New Jersey. Many industrial companies, including Imperial Oil Company, have operated at the site since 1912. Some prior operators produced pesticides and reprocessed waste oil. General operations and waste disposal practices contaminated groundwater and soils within the site property and in off-site locations. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) immediately removed an on-site waste clay pile and buried drums. Cleanup of the site property, nearby residential homes and the surrounding wetlands began in 1991. Cleanup activities included installation of oil and water treatment systems and digging up and disposing of contaminated soil off site. In 2008, EPA demolished remaining buildings and storage tanks on the property. Between 2009 and 2011, EPA removed contaminated soil and floating product on top of the groundwater; backfilled with clean soil and regraded the site; excavated the contaminated wetlands and restored them; and fenced the site. Working with NJDEP, EPA created protected wetland areas and two wildlife habitats for box turtles. The wetlands now support the local box turtle population and other wildlife. About half of the site property is available for residential and commercial development.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Industrial Latex Corp.

The 9.6-acre Industrial Latex Corp. Superfund site is located in Wallington, New Jersey. From 1951 to 1983, the Industrial Latex Corporation made chemical adhesives and natural and synthetic rubber compounds on site. The process contaminated site soil with hazardous chemicals. Following investigations, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. From 1986 to 2000, EPA demolished site buildings and removed on-site vats, dug up and treated contaminated soil, and removed and disposed of buried drums off site. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2003. The Wallington Department of Public Works uses part of the site for storage.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Jackson Township Landfill Capped Site Reuse

The Ocean County Modelers, a local airplane modeling club, at the Jackson Township LandfillJackson Township LandfillThe 135-acre Jackson Township Landfill Superfund site is located in Jackson Township, New Jersey. The site originally hosted surface mining operations before the Township began using the area as a municipal landfill in 1972. The Township accepted waste at the landfill, including sewage sludge, septic tank wastes and solid wastes. In 1977, after residents complained of poor water quality, tests revealed contamination in the groundwater. As a result, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) provided an alternate water supply for residents with contaminated wells in 1980. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The Township conducted site and well investigations. The results showed that levels of contaminants in the groundwater have been decreasing since the early 1980s. Jackson Township closed the landfill in accordance with state regulations in the late 1980s. EPA selected a long-term monitoring plan to make sure the site does not pose a threat to the surrounding community. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1995. Air and groundwater monitoring are ongoing. A local Academy of Model Aeronautics chartered club, the Ocean County Modelers club, uses part of the site as a flying field.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Landfill & Development Co. Alternative Energy Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Landfill & Development Co.Landfill & Development Co.The 200-acre Landfill & Development Co. Superfund site is located in Burlington County, New Jersey. A sand and gravel pit operated on site from the early 1940s until about 1968. The Landfill and Development (L&D) Company operated a landfill on site from 1976 to 1981. Landfill operations contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. The L&D Company began cleaning up the site in 2006. The remedy includes new wells for affected residents and ongoing groundwater treatment. In 2015, the Public Service Electric & Gas Company (PSE&G) built a solar farm on 53 acres of the site. PSE&G adapted the design of the solar array to protect the landfill cap. The solar array includes 42,000 panels. It produces enough energy to provide power for about 2,000 homes.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Lightman Drum Company

The Lightman Drum Company Superfund site covers about 15 acres along Route 73 in Winslow Township, Camden County, New Jersey. It is within the New Jersey Pinelands Protection Area. In 1974, the Lightman Drum Company started operating an industrial waste hauling and recycling business on site. In the late 1980s, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) investigated and found contaminated groundwater and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Under an EPA Removal Order, in 2007, the potentially responsible parties removed contaminated soil from the area where underground waste storage tanks were located. EPA selected the remedy for soil and groundwater in 2009. EPA selected an additional remedy for a small area of contaminated soil in 2011. Cleanup included construction of an air sparging and soil vapor extraction system, which was completed in 2013. Cleanup also includes monitoring the groundwater, which flows off the site to the south. The system continues to operate and groundwater monitoring is ongoing. Currently, United Cooperage operates a business on an uncontaminated part of the site near Route 73. This business stores drums and tractor trailers at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This businesses employed 7 people and generated an estimated $1,000,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Lipari Landfill Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

Aerial photograph of the new baseball fields, now open to the public, at Lipari Landfill siteLipari LandfillThe 16-acre Lipari Landfill Superfund site is located in Gloucester County, New Jersey. From 1959 to 1971, a landfill operated on site. The landfill accepted industrial waste materials and emitted noxious vapors that caught fire on several occasions. After its closure in 1971, the landfill continued to emit chemical odors and fumes, resulting in respiratory problems for nearby residents. Landfill wastes also contaminated surface water, groundwater, sediment and soil. In response, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA immediately fenced and contained the landfill to prevent further contaminant migration. Cleanup activities included treatment of contaminated groundwater and removal and treatment of contaminated sediments from wetland areas. EPA partnered with the borough of Pitman, affected communities, the state of New Jersey and the potentially responsible party (PRP). The partnership enabled cleanup to proceed in a manner compatible with the community’s reuse plans. After EPA and the PRP cleaned up Alcyon Lake, it reopened to the public in 1995. The community restored an adjacent racetrack property used by EPA to manage contaminated sediments during the lake cleanup. The property is now part of Alcyon Park. It features baseball fields, softball fields, a football field, two soccer fields, a picnic pavilion, bike path, concession stand, wildflower meadow, open play area, nature trail, parking lot, and restored streams and marshes.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Maywood Chemical Co. Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Maywood Chemical Co. Superfund site is located in Maywood, Lodi and Rochelle Park, New Jersey. In 1895, Maywood Chemical Works began manufacturing a wide variety of chemical products. From 1916 to 1957, radioactive thorium processing also took place at the facility. The company’s disposal practices allowed contaminants in waste material to spread via stream runoff. This resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List in 1983 and selected a cleanup plan to address radiological soil contamination in 2003. Additional cleanup plans were selected in 2012 to address a portion of the groundwater contamination and in 2014 to address non-radiological soil contamination. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) conducts the radioactive soil cleanup work and a private potentially responsible party is addressing non-radiological contamination at the site. Ongoing cleanup activities include removal and disposal of contaminated materials as well as restrictions on land use. EPA’s cleanup process has allowed the continued use of the site throughout investigation and cleanup efforts. Today, the Stepan Company makes specialty chemicals on site. Additional site uses include 60 residential properties and 33 commercial and government properties. Local government land uses on site include three parks and a fire station. Soil remediation at the location of a recently demolished 7-acre warehouse on a commercial property is currently ongoing. EPA and USACE are coordinating federal and private-party cleanup activities to allow faster commercial redevelopment of the property.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 14 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 370 people and generated an estimated $472,396,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Monitor Devices, Inc./Intercircuits, Inc. 

The 2-acre Monitor Devices/Intercircuits Inc. Superfund site is located in Wall Township, New Jersey. Between 1977 and 1980, site operations included the manufacture of printed circuit boards. Operators discharged process wastewater into a small, unlined pond or directly on the ground behind the building. Operators also stored drums and plastic containers outside. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. A 2005 EPA site investigation determined that site activities resulted in the contamination of groundwater and soil. Cleanup activities included the treatment of contaminated groundwater. In 2006, EPA found that site soil did not pose a risk to human health or the environment. As a result, EPA decided no further action was needed for soil. In 2009, EPA awarded the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) a contract to clean up groundwater. The site received $3 million in federal funding in 2009. The Corps used the funding to begin groundwater cleanup. Cleanup activities are ongoing. As of 2015, EPA has cleaned about 70 percent of the contaminated groundwater plume. The site is occupied by a local business and is used as a repair and storage facility.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Montclair/West Orange Radium Site Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 120-acre Montclair/West Orange Radium Superfund site is located in the towns of Montclair and West Orange, New Jersey. The site included 469 residential and 10 municipal properties. In the early 1900s, radium processors disposed of waste materials on undeveloped land at the site. These activities resulted in widespread radioactive soil contamination. In the 1920s, residential developers used contaminated materials to fill in low-lying areas. The developers built many homes on the contaminated fill. In a few instances, developers mixed contaminated materials into cement for sidewalks and foundations. In 1983, the state of New Jersey identified homes on site with high levels of radon as well as indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1985. Cleanup work began in 1990. Cleanup included removal and off-site disposal of radium-contaminated soil. Afterwards, workers restored properties. Cleanup and restoration work finished in 2004. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2009. The successful cleanup allowed the continued use of streets and enabled hundreds of residents to remain in their homes.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Montgomery Township Housing Development

The 72-acre Montgomery Township Housing Development site is located in Somerset County, New Jersey. Until 1961, the site was privately owned and used for farming. Tri-State Development Corporation purchased the land in 1961 and began building 71 homes. A 1978 study of the Rocky Hill Borough well (neighboring to Montgomery Township) found volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater. State sampling of commercial and domestic wells in Montgomery Township in 1979 also identified VOCs. Because of the proximity and the similarity of the contaminants, EPA decided to jointly address the site and the Rocky Hill Municipal Well Superfund site. EPA added both sites to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included alternative water supplies for the Montgomery Township Housing Development, groundwater treatment, sealing of private water supplies, and long-term monitoring. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. The site is in continued residential use. The Montgomery Township Shopping Center is also located on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 30 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 290 people and generated an estimated $63,921,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Myers Property

The 5-acre Myers Property Superfund site is located in Franklin Township, New Jersey. Starting in the 1920s, companies made chemicals and pesticides on site. These activities resulted in the contamination of soil and groundwater with volatile organic compounds and pesticides. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Early cleanup activities included the removal of contaminated soil, drums and debris, as well as fencing of contaminated areas. Additional cleanup included the removal of contaminated soil, treatment and monitoring of groundwater, and demolition and disposal of contaminated buildings. Today, a state-owned recreation trail runs through the site and is open to the public.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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NL Industries  

The 44-acre NL Industries Superfund site is located in Pedricktown, New Jersey. The site operated as a secondary lead smelting facility from 1972 to 1984. During operation, NL Industries, and later National Smelting of New Jersey, Inc., recycled lead batteries. When operations ceased, contamination was left behind in the form of slag waste and lead oxide piles, drums and debris, contaminated building surfaces, and contaminated surface water and sediments in basements, pits and sumps. Operations at the site resulted in contamination from heavy metals, which affected groundwater, surface water, soil and sediment. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Site cleanup included removal of contaminated soils, sludges and debris for off-site treatment and disposal. Lead-contaminated soil and sediments have been removed. A pilot test to remove metals from groundwater by decreasing the acidity of the soil has been completed and the full remedy is about to start. In September 2015, an industrial equipment supplier bought the site for storage of surplus items prior to resale. The company owns the adjacent property and is using the site to expand its business operations.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Pepe Field Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse

E.F. Drew Company used the 3-acre Pepe Field Superfund site in Boonton, New Jersey, as a landfill for almost 30 years. From the 1920s until 1950, the company disposed of processing waste from oil and from making cleaning products. The site remained vacant until the town of Boonton (the Town) bought the property in the mid-1960s. The Town covered the site with soil and built recreational amenities. However, because of the biological decay of waste material under the field, strong toxic odors affected the site. In 1969, the Town closed the recreational facility. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) and began cleanup activities. These activities included collection and treatment of water that collected contaminants as it passed through the landfill, and stabilization and removal of wastes. Workers also installed a landfill gas collection and treatment system. The cleanup activities included measures to restore the recreational amenities of the park. The on-site recreational facility, restored and reopened in 2000, includes a little league field, walking paths, a playground, a basketball court, gazebo and concession stand. EPA also transferred a residential property next to the site from the federal government to the Town for use in conjunction with the park. In 2003, EPA deleted the site from the NPL. Today, the site, formerly a city eyesore, provides field space for residents of Boonton to enjoy baseball.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Pijak Farm

Pijak FarmPijak FarmThe 87-acre Pijak Farm Superfund site is located in Plumstead Township, New Jersey. From 1963 to 1970, a specialty and research chemicals disposal facility dumped drums and free-flowing liquids into a natural ditch at the site. Operators then covered the ditch with soil. In 1980, state officials and EPA identified contamination in groundwater. The community used groundwater for drinking water, crop irrigation and livestock watering in surrounding agricultural areas. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included the removal and off-site disposal of waste material and contaminated soil as well as groundwater monitoring. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1997. The site remains in continued use; residential and agricultural areas are located on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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PJP Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Peapod delivery trucks parked on sitePJP LandfillThe 87-acre PJP Landfill site is located in Jersey City, New Jersey. It is bordered by Routes 1 and 9 and the Hackensack River and is bisected by the Sip Avenue Ditch, which is part of the city stormwater system. The site was originally a salt marsh. Historically, the site has had a variety of owners and various businesses have operated there. In 1932, local parties condemned part of the site to construct supports for the elevated Pulaski Skyway. The PJP Landfill Company operated a commercial landfill on site from 1970 to 1974, which accepted chemical and industrial waste. Although the landfill closed in 1974, allegations of illegal dumping continued until 1984. From 1970 to 1984, there were frequent smoky fires. In 1982, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). By 1986, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) extinguished the subsurface fires and capped a 45-acre area. Cleanup activities also included excavation and collection of about 1 million cubic yards of contaminated materials. NJDEP installed a gas venting system and then replanted the capped area with grass. The additional cleanup activities included excavations, installation of drainage ditches and gas venting systems, wetlands assessment and restoration, and a cap over the entire site. In 2008, AMB Corporation, which merged with Prologis, Inc. in 2011, purchased about 52 acres of the site and agreed to accept responsibility for their portion of the site. They incorporated a landfill cap and gas venting system into the foundation of their warehouse, transfer station and associated parking lots. The cap also underlies a park they constructed along the Hackensack River waterfront. Construction was completed in May 2016 and the facility is fully occupied. On the remaining 32 acres of the site, Waste Management constructed a landfill cap that was designed to optimize the amount of flat area available for use. Waste Management completed construction of this cap in January 2012. Jersey City took ownership of the property in June 2012. Jersey City is now responsible for the operation and maintenance remedy and plans to develop a park and green space there. Monitoring of the site groundwater and surface water is ongoing. In 2018, EPA presented the NJDEP, Jersey City and Prologis, Inc. with an EPA Region 2 Excellence in Site Reuse Award. The award recognizes Superfund site partners who have collaborated with EPA to support redeveloping Superfund sites in ways that are beneficial to the community and compatible with the cleanup.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,425 people and generated an estimated $327,158,273 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Pohatcong Valley Ground Water Contamination

The Pohatcong Valley Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in Warren County, New Jersey. The site is 10 miles long and 1.5 miles wide. It consists of two groundwater plumes caused by past industrial use. In 1978 and 1979, the Warren County Department of Health found elevated levels of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene in two public water supply wells. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) investigated the wells and installed connections to affected homes and businesses in 1989. NJDEP sealed the contaminated wells and created a well restriction area. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA periodically samples residential and commercial wells on site, and refers contaminated wells to NJDEP for treatment. Investigation and cleanup planning are ongoing. Industrial facilities operate on the site source areas.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 267 people and generated an estimated $89,347,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Price Landfill

The 26-acre Price Landfill Superfund site is located in the city of Pleasantville and Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey. In 1971, the site began operating as Price Landfill. The landfill accepted industrial chemicals, sludge, oil, grease, septic tank wastes and sewer wastes. Landfill operations ended by 1976. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included relocation of public water supply wells, construction of a groundwater extraction and treatment facility, and construction of a multi-layer cap on the landfill. Today, these facilities are fully operational with ongoing monitoring of the groundwater and maintenance of the groundwater treatment facility and landfill cap. In 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evaluated whether a renewable energy project would be viable on the landfill. The study showed that the site is a good candidate for a renewable energy project. EPA and site stakeholders are actively engaged in the development of a beneficial reuse project that involves installation of a solar array on the landfill.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Radiation Technology, Inc.

The 263-acre Radiation Technology, Inc. (RTI) Superfund site is located in Rockaway Township, New Jersey. Before 1972, activities at the site included the testing and development of rocket motors and propellants. After 1972, site operations included radiation sterilization and production of architectural products and hardwood flooring. Operators stored and disposed of waste drums containing solvents and other organic chemicals. These activities resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup involved removing drums and contaminated soil from the site. A responsible party is currently conducting a pilot test for the groundwater remedy. Currently, most of the site is not in use. Sterigenics International operates in buildings on part of the site. The firm uses radiation to sterilize food, cosmetics and medical devices. EPA’s approach will enable continued business operations during cleanup.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 20 people and generated an estimated $28,727,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Raritan Bay Slag

The Raritan Bay Slag Superfund site is about 1.5 miles in length. It is located in Old Bridge Township and the borough of Sayreville, New Jersey. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, workers built a seawall using slag from a secondary lead smelter. The seawall was built in an area that had sustained significant beach erosion and damage from storms in the 1960s. The slag materials contaminated soil, sediment and surface water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2009. Cleanup activities include surface water monitoring, excavation, and dredging and off-site disposal of slag, battery casings, and contaminated soil and sediment. Land use at the site is recreational.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Ringwood Mines/Landfill

The Ringwood Mines/Landfill Superfund site is located in Ringwood Borough, New Jersey. The site includes 500 acres of historic iron ore mines. From the 1700s until the early 1900s, mining operations took place at the site. Beginning in the 1960s, Ford Motor Company’s Mahwah facility used the site as a disposal area for paint sludge and other waste. After investigations identified widespread contamination in soil and groundwater, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1994. The discovery of additional contamination at the site prompted EPA to relist it on the NPL in 2006. Since 2004, cleanup activities have included removal of additional landfilled paint sludge and contaminated soil. Site investigations are ongoing. Today, businesses, an industrial refuse disposal area, the Ringwood Borough garage, a state park and 50 homes are located on site. As of December 2018, construction of a municipal recycling center is planned on one of the disposal areas once a cap is constructed over the impacted fill material.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 16 people and generated an estimated $4,300,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Riverside Industrial Park

The 7-acre Riverside Industrial Park Superfund site is located in Newark, New Jersey. From 1902 to 1971, Patton Paint Company operated paint and varnish manufacturing facilities on site. From the 1970s to today, companies have operated various facilities on site, ranging from chemical packaging to chemical and cosmetics manufacturing. Investigations into a 2009 spill of oily material into the Passaic River found that improper waste storage posed immediate potential threats to public health and the environment. Facility operations contaminated wastes, soil and groundwater at the site. In 2013, EPA listed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities to date have focused on stopping the river discharge, securing the contamination source and eliminating the immediate threats. Additional investigations and planning for the site’s long-term cleanup are ongoing. As of August 2017, most of the site remains an active industrial park with multiple manufacturing businesses. The city of Newark owns several parts of the site property due to foreclosures.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 10 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 80 people and generated an estimated $37,352,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Roebling Steel Co. Athletic Fields Reuse Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

The entrance to Roebling MuseumRoebling Steel Co.The 200-acre Roebling Steel Co. Superfund site is located next to the Delaware River in Florence Township, New Jersey. Site operators manufactured steel wire and cable products until the 1980s. In later years, industrial facilities operated on parts of the site. Site operators stored and buried raw materials and waste products around the property. These waste disposal practices contaminated sediment, groundwater and soil. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included removing contaminated materials, demolishing buildings and restoring the shoreline. Additional cleanup included removal of contaminated creek and river sediment and restoration of affected wetlands. Funded by a Superfund Redevelopment pilot grant from EPA, Burlington County developed a reuse plan for the site. The plan identified several community priorities, including commercial and industrial development as well as historic preservation. New Jersey Transit leased part of the site for a light rail commuter station and parking lot in 2005. Restoration of the historic Main Gate House, completed in 2009, transformed the former gateway to the Roebling Mill into part of the Roebling Museum. The museum provides 7,000 square feet of exhibit space documenting the community’s social and industrial history. An area of the site once used to store slag waste is now part of a community park. EPA collaborated with Florence Township to ensure the cleanup would support future use. The riverfront park includes walking and biking trails and provides water views of historic Roebling. With EPA’s mission to protect human health and the environment in mind, EPA established the Superfund Task Force in May 2017 to provide recommendations for improving and expediting site cleanups and promoting redevelopment. Based on the Superfund Task Force recommendations, EPA identified the site as a Redevelopment Opportunity site – a site with the greatest expected redevelopment potential.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 2 people and generated an estimated $197,000 in annual sales revenue.
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Rolling Knolls LF

The approximately 170-acre Rolling Knolls Landfill Superfund site is located in Green Village, New Jersey. The site was used as an unlined landfill for just over 30 years. The privately owned landfill, which closed in 1968, received solid waste, including construction and demolition debris, household refuse, and scrap metal. Landfill operations contaminated soil, sediment, surface water and groundwater with metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, and volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List in 2003. From 2007 to 2015, a remedial investigation defined the site’s physical characteristics, the nature and extent of contamination, sources of contamination, and fate and transport of contamination. About 35 acres of the site is in a wilderness area in the 8,000-acre Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. A reuse assessment took place in 2017 to help understand the reasonably anticipated future uses for the site. As the next step in the Superfund process, EPA will select a cleanup plan to address risks associated with site contamination.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Route 561 Dump

The Route 561 Dump Site consists of about 19 acres in Gibbsboro, New Jersey, including commercial, residential and undeveloped properties, wetlands and a small creek. It is one of three Superfund sites in the area affected by industrial activities at a former Sherwin-Williams paint and varnish plant. The paint and varnish plant operated from the mid-1800s to 1978, first as John Lucas and Company and later as Sherwin-Williams. Plant operators disposed of wastes along what is now Route 561. In 1997, Sherwin-Williams entered into an Administrative Order on Consent (AOC) with EPA to perform a series of removal actions and restrict access to the site. This included covering three bare soil areas containing high levels of contamination with an impermeable membrane, and installing a layer of clean fill material and top soil. Sherwin-Williams installed silt fencing to prevent erosion from carrying soils into the stream and wetlands. Site access was restricted with a chain-link fence along the perimeter. Sherwin-Williams also installed a security system with video surveillance. EPA proposed the Route 561 Dump Site for listing on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1998. Under a 1999 AOC, Sherwin-Williams investigated the area and found soil, sediment, groundwater and surface water contaminated primarily with lead and arsenic. In 2015, EPA selected a remedy for residential soil and in 2016, EPA selected a remedy to clean up lead and arsenic in soil and sediment. The remedy consists of removing contaminated soil and sediment, capping areas where contamination remained and restoring the areas. In 2017, EPA signed an AOC with Sherwin-Williams for design and construction of the non-residential remedy. Sherwin-Williams will pay for, design and construct the remedy and restoration of the area. EPA will oversee the process.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 10 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 40 people and generated an estimated $11,197,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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South Brunswick Landfill

The 68-acre South Brunswick Township Landfill Superfund site is located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. The landfill received municipal refuse, pesticides, chemical wastes and hazardous wastes for over 20 years before it closed in 1978. These operations contaminated groundwater and surface water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1982. Cleanup activities included a landfill cap, gas ventilation system, leachate collection system, and groundwater collection for treatment. After completing the cleanup activities, EPA removed the site from the NPL in 1998. In 2018, Republic Services and New Jersey Resources Clean Energy Venture unveiled a 40,000-panel solar array on the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Spence Farm

The Spence Farm Superfund site occupies 83 acres in Plumstead Township, New Jersey. From the 1950s to the 1970s, hazardous wastes were dumped across 20 acres of the site. This waste was dumped in drums and in bulk and free-flowing liquid form. Improper waste disposal practices resulted in contamination of groundwater, soil and sediment. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup required the removal of all drums, wastes and contaminated soil, as well as groundwater monitoring. Contaminated soil was disposed of off site. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1997. Today, the site remains in continued agricultural use.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Standard Chlorine

The 42-acre Standard Chlorine Chemical Company, Inc. Superfund site is located in Kearny, New Jersey. From 1916 to 1993, manufacturing activities on site included the production, storage and packaging of moth balls and flakes; manufacturing of lead-acid batteries; formulation of drain cleaners; production of dye carriers; and distillation and purification of chlorinated benzenes. Site operations resulted in the contamination of soil, surface water and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2007. Cleanup activities included containing and treating contaminated groundwater, consolidation and capping of contaminated materials, demolishing buildings and land use controls. The Belleville Turnpike, Newark Turnpike and associated rights-of-way and steep embankments cross part of the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Universal Oil Products (Chemical Division) Core Infrastructure Reuse

Store fronts at the Retail Plaza onsiteUniversal Oil Products (Chemical Division)The 75-acre Universal Oil Products (Chemical Division) Superfund site is located in East Rutherford, New Jersey. Beginning in 1932, a chemical laboratory manufactured chemicals on site. In 1960, business operations expanded to include chemical waste handling. Operators created two unlined wastewater lagoons. Universal Oil Products bought the site property in 1960, and operations ended in 1979. General operations and waste handling practices resulted in contamination of soils and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. EPA conducted early response actions to address contamination in the lagoons. Cleanup efforts in the 1990s focused on the upland portions of the site. In 2005, this area was redeveloped with a home improvement center, a restaurant and a retail shopping center. Cleanup actions in the 2000s focused on site lagoons, wetlands and waterways. In 2008, the New Jersey Pascack Valley Transit Line was extended across part of the site. This rail line connects public transit users with the nearby Meadowlands Sports Complex. Part of the site is used for equipment storage related to adjacent public services uses. EPA continues to work with site stakeholders to complete the site’s cleanup and support reuse.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 16 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 346 people and generated an estimated $113,147,606 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Ventron/Velsicol

The 38.3-acre Ventron/Velsicol Superfund site is located in the boroughs of Wood-Ridge and Carlstadt, New Jersey. From 1927 to 1974, a mercury processing plant operated on site. During operations, plant operators disposed of process waste on site soils and into Berry’s Creek. These actions contaminated soils, groundwater, surface water and sediments with mercury and other contaminants. In the 1970s, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) began investigating the site and discovered site contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Immediate cleanup actions included removing contaminated soils at residential properties and a publicly-owned property. To date, long-term cleanup actions have included excavation and off-site disposal of highly-contaminated soils, capping of lesser-contaminated soils and implementation of institutional controls. EPA selected an interim remedy for the Berry’s Creek Study Area in 2018, which addresses contaminated sediment that is a potential source to other portions of the creek and downstream. EPA has begun designing the remedy. Two industrial warehouses continue to operate on part of the site, and a third warehouse has just been completed in the previously undeveloped portion of the site. Ecological use of Berry’s Creek and the surrounding marshes continue on the site, and the waterways are also used recreationally.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 134 people and generated an estimated $108,978,947 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Vineland Chemical Co., Inc. Capped Site Reuse

The 54-acre Vineland Chemical Co., Inc. Superfund site is located in Vineland, New Jersey. The Vineland Chemical Company produced herbicides and fungicides on site from 1949 to 1994. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater. Nearby water bodies, including Blackwater Branch, Maurice River and Union Lake, also contained contaminants from the facility. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. The site’s remedy includes soil and sediment cleanup, groundwater treatment, and channel and wetlands restoration. Today, the site is in ecological reuse. Restoration of the Atlantic White Cedar wetlands around the Blackwater Branch floodplain area is complete.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Welsbach & General Gas Mantle (Camden Radiation) Athletic Fields Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Welsbach & General Gas Mantle (Camden Radiation) Superfund site is located in Camden and Gloucester City, New Jersey. The site includes two former manufacturing facilities, as well as about 1,000 residential, commercial, industrial and recreational properties. The Welsbach Company and the General Gas Mantle Company produced gas mantles at the site from the late 1890s to 1941. The companies used radioactive elements during production to help the mantles glow more brightly when heated. In the early 1990s, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection found elevated levels of radiation at the site and in many residential areas. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. Cleanup included demolition and off-site disposal of the former General Gas Mantle facility. Cleanup also involved digging up and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and waste materials from residential and industrial properties. Cleanup of several site areas is ongoing, including an active port facility. Today, the site provides space for a variety of uses. In 2008, local groups began working with EPA to construct the Waterfront South Theatre. The theatre opened in 2010. The 4,000-square-foot facility provides space for theatre, music and art in downtown Camden. Site cleanup also included the restoration of local recreation facilities. Restoration of the William Flynn Veterans Complex included rebuilding three baseball fields, a football practice field and parking area. Restoration of the Nicholson Road Sports Complex included restoring three softball fields, a little league baseball field, bathroom facilities and a concession stand. The community celebrated the reopening of the William Flynn Veterans Complex and the Nicholson Road Sports Complex in 2011 and 2014, respectively. Cleanup of the Gloucester City Swim Club property at the site was completed in 2006. EPA provided the funding for the Swim Club to rebuild its clubhouse, concession stand, dive pool and tennis courts. Club members and a swim team use the facilities. In addition, the former Welsbach property is home to the Gloucester Marine Terminal, an active port on the Delaware River. Construction of a solar array on the roof of the terminal took place in 2011. More than 27,000 panels comprise the solar array. The array generates 11 million kilowatt hours of renewable energy each year. EPA worked to expedite cleanup of part of the site when Gloucester City’s Board of Education expressed interest in the area. In 2017, the 122,000-square-foot Gloucester City Middle School opened on the property.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 8 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 138 people and generated an estimated $72,386,033 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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White Chemical Corp.

The White Chemical Corporation (WCC) Superfund site is a 4.4-acre property. The site is located in a heavily populated and industrialized part of Newark, New Jersey. The site formerly operated as an acid chloride and flame-retardant compound manufacturing facility. WCC leased the property from 1983 until October 1990. At that time, EPA issued a Unilateral Administrative Order (UAO) requiring WCC to cease operations. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and EPA found thousands of containers of hazardous substances improperly stored at the site. In 1991, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). NJDEP, and later EPA, removed drums, containers and tanks from the site by 1993. In 2007, EPA demolished site buildings and disposed of contaminated materials off site. From 2008 to 2009, EPA excavated and disposed of contaminated soils at the site. EPA selected the city of Newark (the City) for a Superfund Redevelopment Pilot grant in 2000. The City used the grant funds to determine the best reuse of the site. The site lies within the Airport Support Zone, a 75-acre area next to Newark International Airport. This makes the site prime real estate for redevelopment. The Newark Economic Development Corporation and local community collaborated on a draft reuse plan in 2003. The plan was modified to include the larger Newark Airport Support Zone. The City continues redevelopment discussions as EPA awaits funding for the cleanup of contaminated groundwater beneath the site.

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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