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Superfund Sites in Reuse in New Mexico

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AT & SF (Clovis)

The 140-acre AT&SF (Clovis) Superfund site is located in Clovis, New Mexico. Since the early 1900s, stormwater and wastewater discharge from a nearby railyard contaminated surface water, sediment and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities completed in 2000 included excavation and treatment of sediment, placement of treated sediments in a capped on-site storage facility, bioremediation of soil, fencing, and institutional controls. The site is located over the Ogallala Aquifer, which is a source of drinking water for the city of Clovis. The site includes Santa Fe Lake. The area provides habitat for migratory birds.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Chevron Questa Mine Alternative Energy Reuse

A view of the completed and functioning solar farm at the siteChevron Questa MineThe Chevron Questa Mine Superfund site is located in Taos County, New Mexico. The site includes a former molybdenum mine, milling facility and tailing impoundments. The tailing impoundments are located in the village of Questa; the former mine is located four miles east of the village on State Highway 38; and the former milling facility is located nine miles east of the village on State Highway 38. Mining operations began in 1920. Chevron Mining (CMI), formerly Molycorp, ceased mining operations in June 2014. Open-pit mining on site resulted in the excavation of over 328 million tons of waste rock, which was placed on rock piles around the open pit. Stormwater runoff also carried mining waste over land, contaminating sediments in local surface water bodies, including Eagle Rock Lake. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2011. Cleanup activities include excavating and disposing of contaminated soil, regrading, covering, and revegetating the waste rock piles, covering and revegetating the tailing impoundments, installing groundwater recovery systems, treating groundwater, installing stormwater controls, dredging, providing a temporary alternate water supply, placing drilling restrictions, and dewatering the underground mine. Current site uses include a solar facility built by Chevron Technology Ventures on a 20-acre area in 2010. The facility produces about 1 megawatt of energy annually, enough to power about 150 homes. The facility has been operational since April 2011. Kit Carson Electric Cooperative is purchasing the electricity under a 20-year agreement. CMI and other stakeholders also partnered to restore Eagle Rock Lake, a valued community resource. The cleaned-up lake is once again a functioning fishery and its surroundings offer trails, picnic areas, boardwalks and restroom facilities. The Red River hatchery routinely stocks the lake with trout. In September 2017, EPA Region 6 presented its Greenovations Award to Chevron Environmental Management Company, the U.S. Forest Service, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, the village of Questa, and Chevron project contractors Arcadis and ENTACT for their efforts at Eagle Rock Lake.
Last updated October 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Cimarron Mining Corp.

Cimarron Mining Corp.Cimarron Mining Corp.The 18-acre Cimarron Mining Corporation Superfund site is located in Carrizozo, New Mexico. The site includes two areas – the 10.6-acre Cimarron Mill site and the 7.5-acre Sierra Blanca Mill site. From 1960 to 1982, milling operations at the sites contaminated soil, sediment and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. EPA dug up and stabilized contaminated soil with cement and placed it in two on-site disposal areas at the Sierra Blanca Mill site. EPA then capped and revegetated the disposal areas. EPA removed and disposed of drums, tanks and associated piping off-site. At the Cimarron Mill site, EPA extracted and discharged contaminated groundwater to the publicly-owned treatment works. An auto repair shop and salvage yard are located at the Cimarron Mill site, which is fenced to restrict access. The Sierra Blanca Mill site is fenced and available for reuse, except for the two capped disposal cells. The town of Carrizozo owns the Sierra Blanca Mill site and has placed some construction debris adjacent to one of the capped disposal cells on-site.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Fruit Avenue Plume Alternative Energy Reuse

The Downtown @ 700-2nd project is the first Green Workforce Housing Demonstration project to provide affordable rental housing in the Albuquerque’s Downtown coreFruit Avenue PlumeThe Fruit Avenue Plume Superfund site consists of contaminated groundwater under part of downtown Albuquerque, New Mexico. Between 1924 and 1958, Sunshine Laundry operated on site. In 1940, the owner expanded laundry services to include dry cleaning. In April 1989, routine sampling by the City of Albuquerque found contamination in the groundwater. Site investigators determined that past dry-cleaning processes were the cause of the contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in October 1999. Cleanup activities included pumping and treatment of contaminated groundwater and monitored natural attenuation. Collaboration by the New Mexico Environment Department, EPA and a local developer helped support the site property’s return to use as a green housing development. These affordable housing units exceed baseline Green Communities Criteria. Enterprise Community Partners, a national nonprofit, set the criteria. Green features include a water recycling system and rooftop rainwater collection systems. The building has an outdoor courtyard with a community garden. A hospitality center operates a coffee shop on site and provides job training for formerly homeless community members. EPA continues to work with the State and community members supporting reuse opportunities in the area.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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McGaffey and Main Groundwater Plume

The 550-acre McGaffey and Main Groundwater Plume Superfund site is located in Roswell, New Mexico. From 1956 to 1976, several dry-cleaning businesses operated on South Main Street. These former businesses used perchloroethene (PCE) in their daily operations. In 1994, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) discovered contaminants in groundwater samples. Further studies linked the contaminated groundwater to the former dry-cleaning operations. NMED led immediate cleanup actions and connected affected residents to the public water supply. NMED also installed groundwater monitoring wells. In September 2002, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA selected a cleanup plan in 2008 to address risks from chemical vapors entering buildings through the soil. The cleanup plan also aims to restore groundwater quality to drinking water standards. EPA built a vapor intrusion mitigation system to reduce chemical vapors in buildings. EPA also built an enhanced soil vapor extraction system to remove vapors from soil and a central treatment facility. The cleanup approach successfully controls human exposure to remaining contamination. Land uses at the site include commercial businesses, public services, residential areas and agricultural uses. Commercial and municipal uses at the former dry-cleaning properties are ongoing.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 12 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 98 people and generated an estimated $4,244,641 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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South Valley Core Infrastructure Reuse

Potential area for road extension across siteSouth ValleyThe South Valley Superfund site is located in an industrial area of Albuquerque, New Mexico. The site includes two main areas – the former Air Force Plant 83 Site and the Univar Site. Beginning in the 1950s, various companies operated two facilities on the Air Force Plant 83 Site. General Electric Aviation took over in 1984. Parties demolished the facilities in 1997 and 2011. Companies have used the Univar Site for commercial and industrial purposes since the 1960s. Since 1985, Univar USA, a chemicals distribution company, has been active at the Univar Site. Studies found contamination resulting from manufacturing practices in soil and groundwater. EPA placed the South Valley site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup actions at the former Air Force Plant 83 Site included soil and groundwater treatment. Off-site groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. Cleanup actions at the Univar Site include ongoing groundwater treatment. Bernalillo County has developed plans for a connector road between Interstate 25 and the Albuquerque airport. This road will cross the site. The County anticipates that the road will ease traffic and attract new businesses to the area. In 2011, after General Electric Aviation closed its jet engine component plant on site, the company committed to recycling or reusing all usable building materials. This effort kept over 14,000 tons of building materials out of local landfills. It also significantly reduced demolition costs. Univar USA continues to operate on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 8 people and generated an estimated $11,655,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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