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Superfund Redevelopment Initiative

Superfund Sites in Reuse in New York

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Applied Environmental Services

The 3.2-acre Applied Environmental Services Superfund site is located in Glenwood Landing, New York. A chemical waste material blending facility and a hazardous waste storage facility once operated at the site. Applied Environmental Services also recovered fuels from hazardous wastes. Spills, leaks and other activities contaminated soil and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA removed drums and tanks, installed fencing, and collected liquid waste. The site’s potentially responsible parties began soil and groundwater treatment efforts in June 1995; these systems continue to operate today. The site supports ecological reuse. It provides restored salt marsh, coastal shoreline and habitat that support diverse salt marsh and coastal plant and animal species, including marsh vegetation, invertebrates, fish and birds.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Batavia Landfill

The 35-acre Batavia Landfill Superfund site is located in Genesee County, New York. From the 1960s until 1980, several operations dumped industrial wastes at the landfill. This dumping contaminated soils, sediment, surface water and groundwater with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup included consolidation of contaminated soils and wastes under a multi-layered landfill, collection and off-site disposal of leachate, wetlands restoration, and groundwater monitoring. Long-term operation and maintenance activities for the remedy are ongoing. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2005. The seeded landfill cap and revitalized wetland areas at the site have attracted wildlife, including native and migrating birds.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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BEC Trucking

The 3.5-acre BEC Trucking Superfund site is located in Vestal, New York. Prior to the mid-1960s, the area consisted of unimproved marshland. The company that later became BEC Trucking filled in the marshland. BEC Trucking used the property for truck body fabrication, painting and vehicle maintenance operations. In 1982, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation found about 50 improperly-stored drums and evidence of spills on site. The drums contained waste motor oil, metal cutting oil, paint thinners, solvents, methanol, toluene and petroleum distillates. In 1983, the property owner removed and properly disposed of the drums. The property owner also excavated and properly disposed of stained soils. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. EPA later determined that the 1983 cleanup actions were protective of human health and the environment. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1992. The site is currently in use as a storage area for construction materials.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Bethlehem Steel Corp./Lackawanna Plant Alternative Energy Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

Bethlehem Steel Corp/Lackawanna PlantBethlehem Steel Corp/Lackawanna PlantThe 1,100-acre Bethlehem Steel Corp/Lackawanna Plant site is located in Lackawanna, New York. The Bethlehem Steel production plant operated on site from the early 1900s until the mid-1980s. Contamination from the steel plant’s activities made the facility subject to an EPA investigation in the 1990s. Investigations found soil, groundwater, surface water and sediment contamination. Implementation of four interim remedial measures has taken place. EPA has declared portions of the site cleaned up and safe for reuse. Studies to identify and evaluate cleanup options for the site area are ongoing. BQ Energy and UPC Wind expressed interest in the site as a potential location for a wind farm. The companies worked closely with the Lackawanna City Council to obtain local approvals. They also conducted studies to ensure that the site could support wind facilities. By early 2007, construction began on eight windmills on a 30-acre portion of the site. Known as Steel Winds, the project won the Phoenix Award as the largest urban wind farm in the United States and the first located on a former Superfund and industrial brownfield site. Building on the successful development of Steel Winds, the city of Lackawanna (the City) moved a rail line to the site. The City also extended new roads in the surrounding former industrial area. This encouraged redevelopment of the surrounding 400 acres along Lake Erie. In 2012, Steel Winds expanded the project to include six new turbines. The new turbines produce up to 15 megawatts. The original eight turbines produce 20 megawatts. A large solar farm, known as the Steel Sun solar project, occupies another area of the site. Industrial uses occupy other site areas.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 163 people and generated an estimated $36,588,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Brewster Well Field

The 30-acre Brewster Well Field Superfund site is located near the East Branch Croton River in Putnam County, New York. From 1958 to 1983, Alben Dry Cleaners operated on site and discarded dry-cleaning wastes in a nearby dry well. In 1978, testing found contamination in the village of Brewster well field’s water distribution system resulting from the improper waste disposal. Further testing identified a large plume of groundwater contamination. In 1984, the village and EPA’s Office of Research and Development installed a treatment system to remove the contamination in area drinking water. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In 1991, cleanup crews removed contaminated site sediments, sludge and soil and disposed of them off site. In 1996, EPA put a groundwater management system in place. In 2007, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation assumed responsibility for its operations. After a car dealership began operating on site, sampling showed contaminated vapors could affect indoor air quality. This led to the installation of a subslab mitigation system. Restrictions on site and groundwater use remain in place. The car dealership continues to operate on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 25 people and generated an estimated $11,230,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Buckbee-Mears

The 74-acre Buckbee-Mears site is located in Cortland, New York. From about 1974 to 2004, two companies made electronic components on site. The last company abandoned the site in 2005. Chemicals and hazardous waste left behind from past operations contaminated the soil, groundwater and on-site structures. EPA undertook an extensive removal action at the site. EPA negotiated settlement agreements with one of the site’s potentially responsible parties and the local taxing jurisdictions. In 2012, EPA’s Superfund Redevelopment Initiative (SRI) supported a regional seed project at the site. The regional seed project brought together EPA and local government representatives to discuss reuse goals and redevelopment options for the site. A reuse assessment, developed as part of the project, helped facilitate the sale of the property. In 2014, a developer acquired the site property and invested several hundred thousand dollars to overhaul the usable buildings and create the Cortland Industrial Center. The industrial center is not yet in use.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Computer Circuits

The 1.7-acre Computer Circuits Superfund site is located in an industrial area in Hauppauge, New York. From 1969 to 1977, the Computer Circuits company made circuit boards for commercial and military clients on site. Operators emptied waste liquids into several industrial cesspools outside the facility building. Computer Circuits vacated the building in 1977. Monitoring found elevated levels of heavy metals and volatile organic compounds in groundwater. In 1999, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The current owner, 145 Marcus Blvd, Inc., is performing the cleanup with help from EPA. The company installed a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system on the north side of the building in 2005. EPA installed another SVE system on the south side of the building in 2008. The SVE systems remove site-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from two different source areas. The SVE systems also prevent migration of these compounds to the groundwater and into the building. VOC contaminant concentrations in groundwater are below maximum contaminant levels. The current owner monitors indoor air to ensure air quality inside the building. Multiple commercial businesses operate in the building at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 11 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 44 people and generated an estimated $70,891,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Eighteenmile Creek

The Eighteen Mile Creek Superfund site is located in Niagara County, New York. The site includes 15 miles of creek, including the Eighteen Mile Creek Corridor (from the headwaters at the Barge Canal to Harwood Road in Lockport, New York) and the creek sediment north of Harwood Road to Lake Ontario. Most of the contamination has been found in the Eighteen Mile Creek Corridor and properties along Mill Street, Water Street and Clinton Street in the city of Lockport, New York. Specific sources of contamination have not been identified. Various manufacturing facilities operated within the site. Facility activities contaminated sediments, soil and groundwater in and around the creek. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2012. Cleanup activities include permanent relocation of some residents, fish advisories, demolition of buildings at the former Flintkote Plant, soil removal, sediment removal, and capping. Investigations are continuing at the site. Continued uses of the site during cleanup include residential properties and Upson Park. Upson Park is a public park used for walking, picnicking, and other passive recreational activities.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision Capped Site Reuse

A 40,000 square foot commercial building was constructed over the cap in 2003 and is currently being used as a distribution facilityForest Glen Mobile Home SubdivisionThe 39-acre Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision Superfund site is located in Niagara Falls, New York. During the 1970s, illegal dumping of chemical wastes occurred on site. Developers inadequately covered an 11-acre area of the site formerly used for dumping. From the mid-1970s to 1980s, a mobile home community occupied this area. In 1987, an EPA site assessment found soil and groundwater contamination. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989. Permanent relocation of the 53 families living in the subdivision began in 1990. Cleanup activities included fencing the site to prevent access, removing contaminated soil, and consolidating and capping contaminated soil in the former subdivision area. In 2003, a one-story, 40,000-square-foot warehouse building was built over the capped area of the site. A wholesale supply store operates out of the facility. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed one person and generated an estimated $3,458,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Gowanus Canal Capped Site Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse Green Remediation Reuse

Gowanus CanalGowanus CanalThe Gowanus Canal Superfund site is located in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. The 100-foot-wide, 1.8-mile canal borders several neighborhoods, as well as commercial and industrial uses. The Gowanus Canal has provided industrial boat access into Brooklyn since the 1860s. Industries operating on the canal have included manufactured gas plants, coal yards, cement makers, soap makers, tanneries, paint and ink factories, machine shops, chemical plants and oil refineries. Operators along the shoreline disposed of untreated industrial wastes in the canal. Raw sewage and surface water runoff have deposited additional wastes in the canal for decades. Although much of the industrial activity along the canal has stopped, high contaminant levels remain in canal sediments. The canal is also part of the New York-New Jersey Estuary, which EPA has designated as an Estuary of National Significance. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2010. EPA selected a remedy for the canal in 2013. It includes removing contaminated sediment and capping. The cleanup also includes controls to prevent raw sewage overflows and other land-based sources of contamination from compromising the cleanup. Tours and events have taken place at the canal and in surrounding areas. Since 2011, the Gowanus Canal Conservancy has worked with volunteers to create floating gardens in the waterway. Residents use the canal for recreational purposes. A supermarket featuring a rooftop greenhouse opened in 2013. A developer worked with EPA to clean up sources that could contaminate the canal. Following cleanup of these properties, the developer constructed 700 residential units. The canal provides ecological habitat. As a pilot project, in 2016, a private design firm constructed artificial wetlands to act like pollution-absorbing sponges. A number of commercial and residential redevelopment efforts are underway in the site area.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Hiteman Leather Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The Hiteman Leather Superfund site is located in the village of West Winfield, New York (the Village). The Hiteman Leather Company operated a tannery on site for over a century before abandoning the property in 1968. State and federal investigations between 1988 and 1996 found high levels of metals in site soils and river sediments. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Cleanup activities included removal of the former tannery building’s foundation and excavation and on-site consolidation of contaminated soils and sediments. A soil cap and low-permeability liner now encapsulates and covers the consolidated materials. The Village received a pilot grant from EPA’s Superfund Redevelopment Initiative to develop a reuse assessment and redevelopment plan for the site. EPA took considerations from the plan into account during cleanup. The plan included construction of a community center and recreational facilities, updating an existing public works facility, and additional commercial development. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2012. The Village also uses parts of the site for storage. The site includes a wetlands area. The community also uses recreational biking and walking trails on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Hopewell Precision

The 5.7-acre Hopewell Precision Superfund site is located in East Fishkill, New York. Since the early 1970s, Hopewell Precision has made sheet metal parts and assemblies on site. Operations included painting, degreasing and improperly disposing of wastes directly on the ground. These activities contaminated groundwater with volatile organic compounds. Initial cleanup activities included the installation of in-home water treatment units and ventilation systems for affected residents. The ventilation systems addressed vapor intrusion caused by the contaminated groundwater. In 2005, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup includes monitoring of natural processes to address groundwater contamination. The cleanup plan also calls for an alternate water supply for affected homes. These cleanup activities are underway. EPA’s initial activities have allowed for the continued industrial use of the site property.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 2 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 24 people and generated an estimated $4,651,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Hudson River PCBs

The Hudson River PCBs Superfund site includes about 200 miles of the Hudson River in eastern New York State. The site extends from the village of Hudson Falls to Battery Park in New York City. From 1947 to 1977, General Electric discharged polychlorinated biphenyls into the Hudson River from its capacitor manufacturing plants at Hudson Falls and Fort Edward. The Hudson River includes the Champlain Canal. These discharges contaminated river water, sediments and fish. The contamination has also impacted floodplains outside of the river banks. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1984. Cleanup activities have included floodplain soil and sediment removals, capping, monitoring of natural processes, habitat reconstruction and monitoring, and fish consumption advisories and/or restrictions. The river supports a variety of water-based recreation activities, including sport fishing, waterfowl hunting, swimming and boating. The Champlain Canal includes commercial and recreational uses. Large farms and residential properties in the floodplain are also impacted by contamination.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Kenmark Textile Corp.

The 5-acre Kenmark Textile Corp. Superfund site is located in East Farmingdale, New York. Several textile dying, printing and screening businesses operated at the site beginning in the early 1900s. Site operations have used a wide range of chemicals. Operators disposed of wastewater from the manufacturing process on site in outdoor lagoons. Storage of hazards wastes on site also took place. In 1986, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup included removing more than 50 drums of hazardous waste and other contaminated materials from the site. In 1994, EPA determined that no further cleanup was necessary. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1995. Several light industrial businesses are located at the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 196 people and generated an estimated $16,342,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Li Tungsten Corp. Core Infrastructure Reuse Cultural/Historical Reuse

Glen Cover Ferry TerminalLi Tungsten Corp.The Li Tungsten Corp. Superfund site is located in Glen Cove, New York. From 1942 to 1985, a metal processing facility operated on site. Facility operations contaminated site soils, groundwater, sediments, surface water and Glen Cove Creek with heavy metals, radionuclides, slag and ore residuals. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1992. Short-term cleanup included the removal of chemical storage tanks. Long-term cleanup included excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated ore residuals, soils and sediments, as well as groundwater monitoring. Long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing. In summer 2016, the local government completed construction of a ferry terminal on site. The ferry terminal is next to the Glen Isle Project, a mixed-use development that will feature apartments, a hotel and conference center, office and retail space, and parks. In 2016, EPA amended the cleanup plan for the site to ensure that future site use and redevelopment activities are compatible with the cleanup. The city of Glen Cove plans to redevelop the site for commercial and restricted residential purposes as part of the area’s larger development plan.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Liberty Industrial Finishing

Liberty Industrial FinishingLiberty Industrial FinishingThe 30-acre Liberty Industrial Finishing Superfund site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. Beginning in the early 1930s, an aircraft parts manufacturer and a metal-finishing facility operated on the site. From 1940 to 1944, site facilities made products for World War II. After the war, aircraft parts manufacturing continued through 1957. At that time, an industrial park began operating on site – operators plated and finished metal and made fiberglass products on site. From the 1980s to 2009, the site hosted light manufacturing facilities and warehouses. Industrial activities on site contaminated soil, sediment and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. Cleanup included removal of underground storage tanks, contaminated soil and sediment, as well as groundwater treatment. Parties completed remedy construction in September 2012. Groundwater treatment systems continue to operate. With the town of Oyster Bay (the Town) interested in the western part of the site for a park expansion, EPA entered into an agreement with the Town in 2002. The agreement ensured protectiveness of the site’s remedy and enabled reuse to move forward. In return for EPA waiving potential Superfund liability for the local government and releasing Superfund liens on the site property, the Town made a substantial payment to EPA to help fund cleanup activities and reimburse the Agency for its costs. In September 2003, the Town acquired the site’s western parcel using its eminent domain authority. In July 2010, the Town took ownership of the 7.5-acre central parcel. Following EPA’s cleanup and additional soil cleanup by the Town to meet state standards for residential reuse, the Town held community planning meetings for the Ellsworth Allen Park expansion. Plans for the park include a community center, ballfields, a multi-purpose sports field and green space. Site stakeholders also redeveloped the eastern part of the site in 2010. A supermarket, bank and parking lot are located on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 100 people and generated an estimated $22,222,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Little Valley

The Little Valley Superfund site is a trichloroethylene-contaminated groundwater plume that is about eight miles long. The plume extends from the village of Little Valley to the northern edge of the city of Salamanca in Cattauragus County, New York. Salamanca is part of the Allegheny Indian Reservation. In 1982, county and state officials identified contamination in private wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1996. Two areas were identified as current sources of contamination and three areas were identified as likely past sources. Cleanup activities included treatment of drinking water, soil treatment, soil excavation, and installation of subslab mitigation systems at homes where they are needed. Residential use continues on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Magna Metals

The Magna Metals Superfund site is located in Cortandt Manor, New York. Magna Metals conducted metal plating, polishing and lacquering operations at the site from 1955 to 1979. During operation, Magna Metals discharged wastewater containing metal salts, cyanides, sulfates and trichloroethylene into a series of interconnected settling tanks and leach pits in the ground. Since 1982, state sampling has found hazardous substance contamination in the settling tanks and leach pits. The tanks and pits have released contamination to soil, groundwater, soil gas, indoor air, sediment and surface water. In 2019, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). The former Magna Metals building was demolished in 2013. EPA started the remedial investigation and feasibility study for the site in the summer of 2019. Buildings on the property continue to be used for offices, a laboratory and warehousing.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Marathon Battery Corp. Cultural/Historical Reuse

Marathon Battery Corp.Marathon Battery Corp.The 70-acre Marathon Battery Corp. Superfund site is located in Cold Spring, New York. The Marathon Battery facility produced batteries for military and industrial use on site and released untreated industrial waste into the Hudson River and nearby marshes. The plant’s owners performed a limited cleanup of the contamination in the 1970s. However, studies revealed that high levels of metals remained in river sediments and surrounding wetlands. In 1983, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). The potentially responsible parties (PRPs) demolished the battery plant and removed contaminated soils from the site and surrounding neighborhood yards. PRPs also removed contaminated sediments from the marshes and the Hudson River. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996. The following year, the Scenic Hudson Land Trust purchased an 85-acre parcel of land along the Hudson River that included part of the site. EPA and the Trust entered into a prospective purchaser agreement that enabled the Trust to redevelop the site without liability for any previous site contamination. The Trust added public hiking trails and added educational points of interest highlighting the area’s history and natural beauty. Visitors can walk around the perimeter of the on-site marsh and view it from a platform at its edge. The 12-acre former factory parcel is now privately owned and is awaiting development.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Mercury Refining, Inc.

Mercury Refining, Inc. site and the exterior of the buildingMercury Refining, Inc.The half-acre Mercury Refining, Inc. Superfund site is located in Guilderland and Colonie, New York. From 1956 to 1998, site operations included mercury extraction from batteries and other materials. Until 1980, operators disposed of waste batteries and other materials behind an on-site processing building. This resulted in contamination of soil, sediment and groundwater. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Initial cleanup activities by Mercury Refining included the removal and disposal of contaminated soil. In 2008, EPA selected a final cleanup plan to address remaining contamination. Cleanup included excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated sediment and surface soil and on-site treatment of deep contaminated soils by in situ solidification/stabilization. Cleanup activities were completed in December 2014. EPA worked with the company to allow continued use of the site property during and after cleanup. Today, Mercury Refining uses an on-site building as an office and processes materials containing precious metals.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 6 people and generated an estimated $1,367,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Newtown Creek Cultural/Historical Reuse

The Newtown Creek Superfund site is a 3.8-mile-long tidal water body in New York City. The creek is a tributary of the East River and has five principal tributaries. In the mid-1800s, the area next to the creek was a busy industrial hub. The area included oil refineries, petrochemical plants, fertilizer and glue factories, sawmills, and lumber and coal yards. The transportation, handling and dumping of oils, chemicals and metals contributed to the creek’s contamination. In addition to the industrial pollution, the City began dumping raw sewage into the creek in 1856. Local facilities have also conducted remedial investigations and cleanup at their sites to stop hazardous discharges to the creek. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2010. Remedial investigations and fieldwork are ongoing. Many factories and facilities still operate along the creek. The community occasionally uses the waterway for recreational purposes such as canoeing and kayaking. The Newtown Creek Alliance and a boat club have spaces along Newtown Creek that they use for boat and equipment storage as well as space for public events such as environmental education classes.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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North Sea Municipal Landfill Capped Site Reuse Core Infrastructure Reuse

The 131-acre North Sea Municipal Landfill Superfund site is located in Southampton, New York. The town of Southampton operated a municipal landfill on site. It accepted trash, construction debris and septic system waste from 1963 to 1995. Site monitoring found that disposal activities resulted in the contamination of groundwater, surface water and soil with heavy metals. Monitoring also found evidence of leachate from the landfill. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included landfill capping and venting. EPA determined that groundwater required no action because contaminant levels were within acceptable risk ranges. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation regulates parts of the former landfill under its municipal waste landfill closure program. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2005. Today, land uses on site include a recreation center, recreation-related businesses and a recycling facility.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 53 people and generated an estimated $2,334,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated GW Area

The Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Ground Water Area Superfund site is located in Garden City, New York. Between 1911 and 1951, private and military aviation activities took place on site. It is likely that chlorinated solvents were used at Roosevelt Field during and after World War II. Chlorinated solvents have been widely used for aircraft manufacturing, maintenance, and repair operations since about the 1930s. Site activities resulted in the contamination of public supply wells and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2000. Cleanup included groundwater treatment, which is ongoing. The cleanup made possible the site’s reuse. The former aviation field is now home to Roosevelt Field Shopping Mall and the Garden City Plaza.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 412 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 5,614 people and generated an estimated $1,061,643,721 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Olean Well Field

The Olean Well Field Superfund site is an 800-acre area of groundwater and soil contamination under the towns of Olean and Portville in Cattaraugus County, New York. The Allegheny River and two of its tributaries, Olean Creek and Haskell Creek, flow through the site. The city of Olean (the City) built a municipal water supply well system in the late 1970s. EPA found contamination in the supply well system in 1981. The City stopped using the system. Groundwater contamination was the result of nearby industrial operations. EPA restarted a water treatment facility on Olean Creek to provide the public with water. EPA installed water filters at affected residential wells. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In 1989, potentially responsible parties (PRPs) connected residences with affected private wells to the water line extension. In 1990, EPA reactivated the public wells with two air strippers to treat the groundwater. The municipal wells provide about 2 million gallons of treated water each day to area residences. After PRPs investigated their respective properties for contamination in 1991, they removed contaminated soil and monitored groundwater. Cleanup is ongoing. The site includes industrial businesses at source areas, as well as large portions of Olean and Portville; these areas remain in continued residential, commercial and public service use.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 1,078 people and generated an estimated $175,579,551 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Onondaga Lake Cultural/Historical Reuse Tribal Lands Reuse

The Onondaga Lake Superfund site is located in the towns of Geddes and Salina, the villages of Solvay and Liverpool, and the city of Syracuse, New York. The site includes several lake tributaries and upland areas around the lake that have contributed contamination to the lake, as well as the lake itself. Industrial operators and municipal wastewater treatment plants regularly released wastes into the lake for over a century. The state of New York banned public fishing at the lake due to contamination in 1970. Although the state reopened the lake for recreational fishing in 1986, a fish consumption advisory remains in place. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Cleanup activities have included building demolition and removal, and treatment of contaminated soil and sediment. Cleanup has also included control and treatment of contaminated groundwater, and restoration of vegetation and wetlands. Cleanup of the upland areas of the site has enabled commercial reuse and expansion of municipal wastewater treatment facilities. In 2014, Honeywell completed removal of contaminated sediments in the lake. In 2016, Honeywell completed lake capping activities. More than 60 species of fish now live in the lake; only nine to 12 species were recorded in the 1970s. About 90 acres of wetlands have been restored and about 1.1 million native plants have been planted. The restored habitat helps to provide the resources needed for a sustainable ecosystem. More than 250 wildlife species are now found on site, including more than 120 bird species. An outdoor amphitheater funded by state and local resources was constructed in 2015 as part of a lakefront revitalization effort. Future plans include streetscape improvements, recreational trail connections around the lake and a public boat launch. A biking and walking trail currently is located on part of the site. Other parts of the site are in continued commercial use and are reused as a busy industrial complex.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 14 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 231 people and generated an estimated $81,646,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Peninsula Boulevard Groundwater Plume

The Peninsula Boulevard Groundwater Plume Superfund site includes the area within and around a groundwater plume in Hewlett, New York. Investigations conducted from 1991 to 1999 identified a groundwater plume. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2004. EPA has identified two dry cleaners that are sources of the groundwater contamination. Cleanup activities have not yet begun. Several hundred residences are located throughout the site. Most residences are single-family homes. There are several small apartment buildings at the site, as well as commercial buildings containing medical and professional offices.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Pfohl Brothers Landfill

The 130-acre Pfohl Brothers Landfill Superfund site is located in Cheektowaga, New York. From 1932 to 1971, landfilling operations occurred on site. These operations resulted in the contamination of soil, surface water, sediment and groundwater. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1994. Cleanup activities included removal of on-site drums, construction of a cap and containment system, and a leachate collection and treatment system. Aero Drive and a wetland area divide the 120-acre landfill into three areas. To support future development, cleanup relocated landfilled materials along these roadways to the interior of the landfills, thereby making about 36 acres of land available for light manufacturing or commercial uses. Additional soil and waste removals helped protect the wetlands area. EPA completed cleanup in 2002 and removed the site from the NPL in 2008. EPA continues to monitor the site. The site is located adjacent to the New York State Thruway (I-90) and is less than one mile from the Buffalo Niagara International Airport. A New York State Thruway ramp and toll plaza are located adjacent to the site. A small lake on site is used for fishing. EPA developed a reuse assessment in 2013 for the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Preferred Plating Corp.

An aerial view of the Preferred Plating Corp. sitePreferred Plating Co., Inc.The 0.75-acre Preferred Plating Corporation Superfund site is located in Farmingdale, New York. Metal-plating operations used various chemicals on site from 1951 until 1976, when the business filed for bankruptcy. Site activities resulted in the generation, storage and disposal of hazardous waste and wastewater. The company improperly disposed of untreated wastewater in pits on site. This activity led to contamination of soil and groundwater with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. In 1994, EPA excavated and removed contaminated soil for off-site treatment and disposal. Between 1994 and 1996, groundwater sampling showed a significant decrease in contamination levels after the cleanup. VOCs decreased to levels below maximum contaminant levels. Ongoing groundwater monitoring ensures that the remedy remains protective. Today, several businesses, including a brewery, operate on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 7 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 22 people and generated an estimated $1,332,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard/Dump

Thanks to a unique agreement among EPA, the city of Cortland (the City), the state of New York, and the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railroad, part of the abandoned Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard/Dump Superfund site has been redeveloped, generating jobs and revenue for the community. Previous site owners dumped hazardous wastes on the property, and drums of unknown chemicals littered the 20-acre site. In 1989, EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL). EPA immediately removed the drums, hazardous debris and contaminated soil, and helped secure the site. EPA worked with local parties to recycle abandoned scrap metal from the site. Workers also constructed a cover over the entire site. During the cleanup, the City developed plans to reuse part of the site as an intermodal rail-to-road transport facility. In 2015, the City worked with Western Railroad to build and make and the intermodal transport facility operational. EPA worked closely with the City to negotiate a prospective purchaser agreement to help the City take title to the property. The agreement ensured that the City would not have responsibility for previous contamination at the site and required that redevelopment construction not damage the cover over the site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business.  EPA did not have further economic details related to this business. For additional information click here.

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Rowe Industries Ground Water Contamination

The 8-acre Rowe Industries Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in Sag Harbor, New York. Beginning in the 1950s, several companies made electronic devices and transformers on site. Operators stored solvents behind the facility. Groundwater and soil contamination led EPA to add the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987. Cleanup activities included removal, treatment and off-site disposal of contaminated soil. Treatment of groundwater is ongoing. EPA’s approach enabled the continued use of the site throughout cleanup activities. Businesses active on site include an electronic devices manufacturer, an ice cream company, a landscaping business and an awning manufacturer. The site also includes several acres of oak forest and a small pond, both of which are part of the Long Pond Greenbelt, a protected ecological sanctuary. There are hiking trails located within the Long Pond Greenbelt.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 6 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 80 people and generated an estimated $12,898,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics

The Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics site is located in Hoosick Falls, New York. Since 1999, the facility has made plastic materials, tapes and foams on site. The facility used perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in its manufacturing process until 2003. This PFOA contaminated public and private water supply wells. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2017. Investigations and cleanup planning are ongoing. Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics continues to operate its facility on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on one on-site business. This business employed 177 people and generated an estimated $36,074,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Smithtown Ground Water Contamination

The Smithtown Ground Water Contamination Superfund site is located in eastern New York state. The site is within the villages of Nisserquogue, Head of the Harbor and the hamlet of St. James. The site is an area of contaminated groundwater that has affected local drinking water supplies. Groundwater is contaminated with tetrachloroethylene (PCE), a solvent used in dry cleaning and metal cleaning. The source of the contamination has not been identified. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1999. Cleanup activities included providing alternate water supplies to homes affected by contamination, groundwater and surface water monitoring, and restrictions on using contaminated groundwater. The site is in a residential area. The Nature Conservancy owns a parcel of property in the center of the site. It has self-guided marked trails available for hiking, bird watching, and other outdoor nature-related activities.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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SMS Instruments, Inc.

Building and sign for Datacomm Cables, a commercial retail business that sells cables and electronics accessories, which currently operates on the SMS Industries, Inc. siteSMS Instruments, Inc.The SMS Instruments, Inc. Superfund site is located in a light industrial area in Deer Park, New York. The site consists of a 34,000-square-foot building on a 1.5-acre lot. The building and asphalt cover about 90 percent of the site. From 1971 to 1983, SMS Instruments maintained military aircraft components and dumped wastewater into a leaching pool. The firm also stored jet fuel in an underground tank and stored corroded and leaking drums in an unprotected outdoor area. These improper handling and disposal practices contaminated groundwater and soil. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1986. To clean up the site, EPA removed the jet fuel tank, pumped, filled and sealed the leaching pond, cleaned up contaminated soil, and treated groundwater. After the cleanup finished and groundwater met drinking water standards, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2010. Commercial and industrial businesses currently operate on site.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 18 people and generated an estimated $11,376,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Syosset Landfill Capped Site Reuse

Sanitation truck parking lot on the siteSyosset LandfillThe 38-acre Syosset Landfill Superfund site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. The landfill operated from 1933 to 1975. During this time, it accepted commercial, industrial, residential, demolition, agricultural, sludge wastes and ash wastes. A 1982 site inspection found that former landfill practices had contaminated soil and groundwater. These practices also created the potential for exposure to landfill gas. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included a permanent ventilation trench. The trench prevents potential migration of gas vapor to neighboring homes and an elementary school. The cleanup also capped waste buried at the site. EPA removed the site from the NPL in 2005. The town of Oyster Bay then returned the site to productive use. A salt storage facility and equipment storage facility are now located on site. The site also has a vehicle parking area for municipal sanitation trucks. The Oyster Bay Civil Service Employees Association and the Oyster Bay Animal Shelter also operate on site. In 2009, the town received funding through the U.S. Department of Energy’s Clean Cities Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program. The funds helped the town build a compressed natural gas fueling station at the site. In 2011, the town completed the station, which fuels 44 sanitation trucks. EPA also coordinated with a local development group regarding its multi-use plans for the site. The plans include reuse of the landfill for recreational purposes. EPA will work with the group to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 3 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 453 people and generated an estimated $163,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2

The Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2 Superfund site is located in Vestal, New York. The site consists of a municipal water supply well. A nearby bulk chemical handling facility contaminated the well with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). After contamination was discovered in 1980, the city of Vestal took the well out of service. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Cleanup activities included installation of an air stripping system with carbon filtration and removal of contaminated soils near the chemical handling facility. EPA took the site off the NPL in 1999. In 1988, the city of Vestal returned the municipal well to public service use.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Wide Beach Development

The 55-acre Wide Beach Development Superfund site is located in Brant, New York. The site is a suburban development of about 60 homes in a small community on Lake Erie, north of the Cattaraugus Indian Reservation. Lake Erie is the western boundary of the Wide Beach Development. Between 1968 and 1978, the Wide Beach Development Homeowners Association sprayed thousands of gallons of waste oil onto the community’s dirt roads for dust control. Some of the waste oil contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a suspected carcinogen. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. In 1985, in response to PCB contamination in homes, EPA performed an emergency response action. This included paving of roadways, drainage ditches and driveways, and decontamination of homes. EPA worked closely with the state of New York and the homeowners to excavate, treat and replace the contaminated soil from roads, driveways and yards. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1994. The site remains in residential use.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Wolff-Alport Chemical Company

The 0.75-acre Wolff-Alport Chemical Company Superfund site is located in Ridgewood, Queens, New York. From the early 1920s until 1954, the Wolff-Alport Chemical Company operated on site, extracting rare earth metals from monazite sand. Until 1947, the company disposed of generated wastes in the sewer and through burial on the property. These disposal actions resulted in radiological contamination of on-site structures, soils, sewers, and sewer sediments. EPA added the site to the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2014. To date, cleanup has included installation of concrete, lead and steel shielding inside some site buildings and a portion of the adjacent sidewalk. Cleanup also included installation of a radon mitigation system in one site building. Future remedial actions include relocation of all on-site tenants, demolition of all site buildings, removal of contaminated soils and sewer sediments, jet cleaning or removal of contaminated sewers, and off-site disposal of all contaminated materials. The site is currently in continued commercial and residential uses. On-site buildings contain a delicatessen/grocery, office space, residential apartments, several auto repair shops, and warehousing space.
Last updated September 2019

As of December 2019, EPA had data on 5 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 19 people and generated an estimated $1,405,000 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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