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Superfund Sites in Reuse in Oklahoma

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Fourth Street Abandoned Refinery

The 27-acre Fourth Street Abandoned Refinery Superfund site is located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A waste oil reclamation facility operated on site from the 1940s to the early 1960s. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 because of soil and groundwater contamination. Cleanup actions addressed contaminated sludge, soil and sediments. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2008. An industrial facility operates on part of the site known as the Pipe Storage Yard. The site includes several property parcels; some are used by businesses and others are available for commercial and industrial redevelopment. EPA continues to work with interested parties to support the site’s safe and appropriate reuse.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 4 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 78 people and generated an estimated $9,018,610 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.
 

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Mosley Road Sanitary Landfill Alternative Energy Reuse

Gas to energy plantMosley Road Sanitary LandfillThe 72-acre Mosley Road Sanitary Landfill (MRSL) Superfund site is located near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A landfill for municipal, industrial and hazardous waste materials has operated on site since 1971. Over six months, operators put about 1.7 million gallons of hazardous waste materials into unlined pits at the landfill. In 1984, Waste Management of Oklahoma (WMO) purchased the site property. After it reached capacity, WMO closed the landfill in 1987. Landfill operations resulted in groundwater contamination. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. WMO completed cleanup activities, which included repairing the landfill cap, adding a soil cover and installing a landfill gas management system. WMO also monitors groundwater. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the NPL in 2013. Working closely with EPA and Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, WMO implemented the first commercial facility for a renewable biogas and natural gas joint venture project. Working with three other companies, WMO designed and built a demonstration project on site. The technology converts methane gas into clean-burning diesel fuel and wax. In 2014, EPA Region 6 recognized WMO’s efforts with its Greenovations Award. In early 2016, prospective developers signed final contracts for construction of the first full-scale commercial gas-to-liquid facility on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Sand Springs Petrochemical Complex Capped Site Reuse

The Sand Springs Petrochemical Superfund site is located in Sand Springs, Oklahoma. The 235-acre area is part of an industrial complex on the northern bank of the Arkansas River. Beginning in the 1900s, various industries operated on site, including oil refineries. In 1984, EPA ordered the emergency removal of contained drums and tanks from a 5.5-acre portion of the site. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) to address soil and groundwater contamination and related wastes. In 1995, potentially responsible parties dug up, stabilized and disposed of petroleum waste material in an on-site landfill. EPA took the site off the NPL in 2000. Between 2004 and 2006, parties dug up and removed sludge material along the banks of the Arkansas River. Operation and maintenance activities at the site are ongoing. A rail company and the City of Sand Springs plan to reuse about 5 acres of the site as a rail facility. The facility will include an area for shipment transfer, storing and loading. On the northern portion of the site, new owners recently purchased an old lumberyard with plans of redeveloping the property. Several companies continue to operate on site.
Last updated June 2017

As of December 2017, EPA had data on 14 on-site businesses. These businesses employed 324 people and generated an estimated $150,340,030 in annual sales revenue. For additional information click here.

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Tar Creek (Ottawa County) Capped Site Reuse Tribal Lands Use

Tar Creek (Ottawa County)Tar Creek (Ottawa County)The Tar Creek (Ottawa County) Superfund site spans about 12,600 acres in the Tri-State Mining District of northeastern Oklahoma, southeastern Kansas and southwestern Missouri. Mining waste piles are located on more than 1,444 acres of the site. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1983. Initial cleanup actions addressed surface and groundwater contamination. Cleanup workers built structures to keep runoff from entering mine systems, plugged mine wells and monitor groundwater. Workers also cleaned residential yards, drinking water wells and public areas and removed abandoned mining chemicals and source materials. As of April 2015, workers had restored over 2,800 residential properties. The cleanup also addressed residential relocation and sale of chat (a mining waste). EPA does not own any chat and will not purchase any chat. However, it is assisting chat sale participants, including the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma and local chat processors, as part of the site’s remedy. EPA used federal funding awarded in 2009 for buyouts and relocations for the towns of Picher, Cardin and Hockerville, Oklahoma, and Treece, Kansas. The buyout and demolition activities are now complete. In 2012, the Quapaw Tribe became the first tribe to manage the cleanup of a Superfund site when it initiated the cleanup of the Catholic 40 portion of the site. Since then, EPA awarded the Quapaw tribe additional cooperative agreements to perform cleanup for other parts of the site. EPA has also awarded cooperative agreements to the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality for remediation of mining waste in residential and rural areas of the site. EPA is performing a remedial investigation of the contaminated sediments located within impacted watersheds. Residential, commercial, public and agricultural uses are ongoing at many cleaned-up properties.
Last updated September 2018

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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Wilcox Oil Company

The estimated 140-150-acre Wilcox Oil Company Superfund site is located in Bristow, Oklahoma. From 1915 to 1963, a crude oil refinery operated on site. Refinery operations contaminated soil and sediment and left behind waste material. EPA placed the site on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2013. Site investigations and cleanup are ongoing. The site includes a church and properties used for mixed purposes including residential, agricultural, commercial, and recreational use.
Last updated April 2018

As of December 2017, EPA did not have economic data related to on-site businesses, or economic data were not applicable due to site use. For additional information click here.

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